Tag Archives: C.difficile infection study

Researchers Find Inpatients Were Most Likely to Acquire a C.diff. Infection When Census Was Between 25-75% Capacity

In a study of more than 550,000 patient discharges from 327 California hospitals, researchers found that patients were most likely to contract Clostridium difficile (C.diff., CDI, C.difficile) —a stubborn and potentially deadly hospital-associated infection (HAI) —when inpatient wards were in the “middle range” of capacity, or between 25% and 75% full.

“Our hypothesis going in was essentially that when hospitals are busier, perhaps care quality is compromised,” Mahshid Abir, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at UM Medical School and the study’s lead author, told FierceHealthcare. “Certainly when we saw these findings, we were surprised.”

Overall, more than 2,000 patients included in the study, which looked at discharges between 2008 and 2012, contracted C. diff during their hospital stay. Hospitals often struggle to control C. diff infections, and a significant number of readmissions can be linked to such infections.

By basing the study around a model that accounts for seasonal staffing changes or unit closure, for example, researchers were better able to filter out infections that a patient had before arriving at the hospital, she said. Calculating occupancy in this way could also help providers identify potential risk factor for infection, according to the study.

Patients admitted to a unit that was at between 25% and 75% capacity were three times more likely to contract C. diff compared to those in units at below 25% or above 75% capacity, according to the study.

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https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/study-explores-link-between-hospital-occupancy-infection-rates

Recent Emergence of C.difficile Infection in Romanian Hospitals – Abstract

Recent Emergence of Clostridium Difficile Infection in Romanian Hospitals is Associated With a High Prevalence of Polymerase Chain Reaction Ribotype 027.

Abstract

AIMS:

To evaluate the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in several Romanian hospitals.

METHODS:

A survey was conducted from November 2013 to February 2014 in 9 hospitals selected from different Romanian regions.

RESULT:

The survey identified 393 patients with C. difficile infection. The median age was 67 years (range: 2-94 years) with 56% of patients older than 65 years. The mean C. difficile infection prevalence was 5.2 per 10.000 patient-days, with the highest prevalence, 24.9 and 20 per 10.000 patients-days, reported in a gastroenterology and an infectious diseases hospital, respectively. The origin of C. difficile infection was health care-associated for 70.5% of the patients, community-acquired for 10.2% of patients and indeterminate for other 19.3%. Severe C. difficile infection was registred in 12.3% cases and in hospital all-cause mortality was 8.8%. Polymerase chain reaction-ribotype 027 was the most prevalent in all participating hospitals, and represented 82.6% of the total ribotyped isolates. Moxifloxacin minimal inhibitory concentrations were higher than 4 μg/mL for 59 of 80 tested isolates (73.8%). Fifty-four of these 59 isolates were highly resistant to moxifloxacin, (minimal inhibitory concentration ≥32 μg/mL) and belonged more frequently to polymerase chain reaction-ribotype 027 (p<0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

The present study is the first multicentre study performed in Romania and shows that the ribotype 027 is largely predominant in C. difficile infection cases in Romania. The prevalence of C. difficile infection in some specialized hospitals is higher than the European mean prevalence and demonstrates the need of strict adherence to infection control programmes.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29188783?dopt=Abstract&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter