Tag Archives: Hospital Infection Control

Researchers Find Inpatients Were Most Likely to Acquire a C.diff. Infection When Census Was Between 25-75% Capacity

In a study of more than 550,000 patient discharges from 327 California hospitals, researchers found that patients were most likely to contract Clostridium difficile (C.diff., CDI, C.difficile) —a stubborn and potentially deadly hospital-associated infection (HAI) —when inpatient wards were in the “middle range” of capacity, or between 25% and 75% full.

“Our hypothesis going in was essentially that when hospitals are busier, perhaps care quality is compromised,” Mahshid Abir, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at UM Medical School and the study’s lead author, told FierceHealthcare. “Certainly when we saw these findings, we were surprised.”

Overall, more than 2,000 patients included in the study, which looked at discharges between 2008 and 2012, contracted C. diff during their hospital stay. Hospitals often struggle to control C. diff infections, and a significant number of readmissions can be linked to such infections.

By basing the study around a model that accounts for seasonal staffing changes or unit closure, for example, researchers were better able to filter out infections that a patient had before arriving at the hospital, she said. Calculating occupancy in this way could also help providers identify potential risk factor for infection, according to the study.

Patients admitted to a unit that was at between 25% and 75% capacity were three times more likely to contract C. diff compared to those in units at below 25% or above 75% capacity, according to the study.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/study-explores-link-between-hospital-occupancy-infection-rates

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Issued Contact Precautions Guidelines On Multidrug-resistant Infections and C. difficile Infections

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) January 2018 issued guidelines on how long hospitals should continue contact precautions for multidrug-resistant infections and Clostridium difficile infections to avoid the spread of potentially deadly organisms through hospitals.

“Because of the virulent nature of multi-drug resistant infections and C. difficile infections, hospitals should consider establishing policies on the duration of contact precautions to safely care for patients and prevent spread of these bacteria,” said David Banach, MD, MPH, an author of the study and hospital epidemiologist at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, in a society news release. “Unfortunately, current guidelines on contact precautions are incomplete in describing how long these protocols should be maintained. We outlined expert advice for hospitals to consider in developing institutional policies to more effectively use contact precautions to safely care for patients.”

Dr Banach and members of the SHEA Guidelines Committee, which includes experts in infection control and prevention, studied available evidence and practical considerations and surveyed SHEA members to develop the updated guidance document. The available evidence, however, is insufficient to issue a formal guideline.

The recommendations were published online January 11 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

The guidance, which covers methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, as well as C difficile, emphasizes the need for clinicians to consider the amount of time since the last positive sample. Specific recommendations include:

  • For patients not receiving antibiotics with activity against methicillin-resistant S aureus ((MRSA), the committee recommends using negative screening cultures to decide when to stop contact protocols. The optimal number of negative cultures is unclear, but 1 to 3 are often used. Hospitals may want to extend contact precautions for high-risk patients with chronic wounds and those from long-term care facilities. The ideal length of extension is unknown, but 6 months is common.
  • For highly resistant Enterobacteriaceae, such as carbapenemase-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or Enterobacteriaceae with few treatment options, hospitals should maintain contact precautions indefinitely.
  • For C difficile infections, contact precautions should be continued for at least 48 hours after the resolution of diarrhea, and clinicians should consider extending precautions if C difficile infection rates remain high despite appropriate prevention and control measures.
  • With cases of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE)  infection, negative stool or rectal swab cultures should be used to determine when to discontinue precautions. One to three negative cultures at least 1 week apart are commonly used.

The authors note that there was insufficient evidence to formally recommend use of molecular testing to help guide decisions on length of contact precautions. However, they said they assume that polymerase chain reaction tests have better sensitivity compared with culture.

Hospitals should carefully gauge their own risks, priorities, and resources when adopting policy on duration of precautions, as costs and practicality of implementation differ, the authors note. In addition, guidance should be reevaluated by infection control leadership, especially when there are outbreaks.

“The duration of contact precautions can have a significant impact on the health of the patient, the hospital, and the community,” coauthor Gonzolo Bearman, MD, MPH, from the Division of Infectious Diseases at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, said in the news release. “This guidance is a starting point, however stronger research is needed to evaluate and optimize the use.”

The guidance was endorsed by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, the Society of Hospital Medicine, and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada.

This study was supported in part by the SHEA Research Network. Various coauthors report ties to Springer Nature for book and journal editing and grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Veterans Affairs’ Health Services Research and Development, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Medimmune, Nanosphere Inc, Techlab, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Premier EHEC and CHRO-Magar 0157, Pfizer, and the University of Louisville. Coauthors also report consultant roles or fees with Xenex/Clorox, Ecolab and Gilead.

 

To review this article in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/891242

Xavier University Researchers 2015 Study Demonstrated That By Using Launderable Mattress Barrier Cover Could Decrease the Number Of Patients Who Became Infected With C. difficile by 50%

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In 2010 Xavier University researcher
Dr. Edmond Hooker began research delving into a possible link between hospital beds and healthcare acquired infections (HAIs).

It immediately became apparent that hospital mattresses have been frequently linked to outbreaks of HAI;s. Hospital mattresses are soft porous surfaces.

They are designed to allow moisture to move away from the patient to prevent skin breakdown and bedsores. However, this design makes it impossible for the mattress surface to be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected using currently available cleaning products.

Dr. Hooker’s first line of scientific inquiry was to culture the surfaces of mattresses that had been “terminally” cleaned and were ready for the next patient. In 2011, the Xavier team showed that these mattresses were still contaminated with pathogenic bacteria despite having been cleaned.

Again in 2012, while investigating the use of a launderable mattress barrier cover,

Dr. Hooker showed that mattresses cleaned using traditional hospital methods were still contaminated with pathogenic bacteria.

Prior research demonstrated that patients who are placed in a bed where the previous patient had Clostridium difficile (C. diff) and/or other bacterial infections are at an increased risk of acquiring those infections.

In 2015, researchers from Xavier University published the results of a landmark study. It demonstrated that, by using the launderable mattress barrier cover in two long-term acute care hospitals (treating extremely ill patients), they could decrease the number of patients who became infected with C. diff by 50%, even when the beds of C. diff patients had been cleaned using bleach.

Another recent study, just published in JAMA, demonstrated that hospital beds are the vector for transmission of C. diff even from asymptomatic patients who had occupied the same bed and received antibiotics during their hospital stay.

It is clear that the hospital environment, especially the hospital bed, is a major vector in the transmission of C. diff and many other bacteria that cause HAIs.

Healthcare providers must find ways to ensure that hospital mattresses are cleaned and disinfected properly between patients, and that additional non-chemical measures are taken, if available, to protect patients.

Enjoy the following Video Clips For Additional Trinity Guardion News

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. Thank You.

Seal Shield LLC, A Healthcare Technology Company, Introduces SKY™ To Their Family Of UVC Sanitizers, Designed To Kill Bacteria and Viruses On Hard To Clean Consumer Electronics

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Seal Shield LLC (Jacksonville, FL), today will demonstrate the SKY™ family of UV Sanitizers at the CES- Consumer Electronics Show, Sands Booth #73213. 

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The SKY™ is the world’s first UV Sanitizer to kill more than 99.95% of pathogens in less than 30 seconds. Designed for use in hospitals to protect patients and practitioners from dangerous cross contamination infections, the Sky is also the perfect solution for mobile retailers and IT / MIS professionals who service and support mobile devices of unknown or dubious origins.

Tablet computers and smart phones have been proven to harbor harmful bacteria and viruses. A study published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology warns that “twenty to thirty percent of viruses can be readily transferred from a fingertip to a glass surface, like that on a touch screen.”

“Mobile device hygiene is imperative in today’s pathogen rich environments. SKY™ was designed to be easy to use, and it can safely disinfect virtually any mobile device in under 30 seconds,” states Seal Shield CEO, Brad Whitchurch.

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The Seal Shield SKY™ is currently available in 2 models.

The SKY™ 6Xi features a horizontal orientation, ideal for desktop applications.

The SKY™ 7Xi features vertical orientation and can be wall mounted or placed on a mobile cart.

The SKY™ sanitizers are the latest additions to Seal Shield’s family of UV infection prevention devices which include the ElectroClave™ and MoonBean™ UV sanitizers.

Seal Shield is a world leader in infection control technology. Seal Shield designs, develops and manufactures medical grade, infection prevention technology for hospitals and the home including UV sanitizers, air purification systems, antimicrobial products, waterproof keyboards, mice and TV remote controls.

 

For more information please visit http://www.SealShield.com/

 

To read article in its entirety:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-sanitizers-for-smart-phones-and-tablets-can-reduce-the-spread-of-super-bugs-in-under-30-seconds-300199923.html?tc=eml_cleartime&utm_source=NetSuite+Contacts&utm_campaign=f41fd750a2-SKY%2FCES16&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e25719ba34-f41fd750a2-102891281