Tag Archives: C. diff. Infection Control

Researchers Find Inpatients Were Most Likely to Acquire a C.diff. Infection When Census Was Between 25-75% Capacity

In a study of more than 550,000 patient discharges from 327 California hospitals, researchers found that patients were most likely to contract Clostridium difficile (C.diff., CDI, C.difficile) —a stubborn and potentially deadly hospital-associated infection (HAI) —when inpatient wards were in the “middle range” of capacity, or between 25% and 75% full.

“Our hypothesis going in was essentially that when hospitals are busier, perhaps care quality is compromised,” Mahshid Abir, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at UM Medical School and the study’s lead author, told FierceHealthcare. “Certainly when we saw these findings, we were surprised.”

Overall, more than 2,000 patients included in the study, which looked at discharges between 2008 and 2012, contracted C. diff during their hospital stay. Hospitals often struggle to control C. diff infections, and a significant number of readmissions can be linked to such infections.

By basing the study around a model that accounts for seasonal staffing changes or unit closure, for example, researchers were better able to filter out infections that a patient had before arriving at the hospital, she said. Calculating occupancy in this way could also help providers identify potential risk factor for infection, according to the study.

Patients admitted to a unit that was at between 25% and 75% capacity were three times more likely to contract C. diff compared to those in units at below 25% or above 75% capacity, according to the study.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/study-explores-link-between-hospital-occupancy-infection-rates

C. diff. Awareness Across the Globe

cdiffawarenessribbon

Beginning November 1st,

join the C Diff Foundation in

“Raising C. diff.  Awareness.”

Let’s begin with promoting C. difficile prevention to share in witnessing a decrease in C. difficile infections worldwide.

Ways to PREVENT acquiring a C. diff. infection:

HAND-WASHING remains the #1 course of action in infection prevention.

Knowing how and when to wash hands is also important.

Correct Hand-washing steps to follow:

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 30 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well with water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel.
  • Turn off faucets with a clean dry towel, and wipe hands with a clean dry towel.

WHEN is it a good time to wash hands?

  • Before, during, and after handling and preparing food.
  • Upon Entering a Patient’s room and Before Existing a Patient’s room.
  • Before and after eating.
  • Before and after patient care.
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound.
  • Before  exiting a restroom.
  • After changing diapers.
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • After petting a pet or any livestock animals.
  • After touching garbage.
  • AND OFTEN.

Limit Antibiotic Use — Discuss Symptoms With Healthcare Providers.

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommends infection control protocols be shared between healthcare professionals and long-term facility administrators for the safety of the patient, visitors, and other patient’s safety.

Question the necessity of antibiotics to treat symptoms.  Unnecessary use of antibiotics raises the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Remember antibiotics do not effect viruses.  Healthcare professionals; confirming a bacterial infection before prescribing antibiotic course of treatment is advised.

Take the Antibiotic “Resistance Fighter” Pledge

How to be a resistance fighter:  Limit the use of Antibiotics! Understand that antibiotics are only effective against bacteria and not viruses: colds, flu and most coughs are caused by viruses and will get better on their own.  Treat your flu and cold symptoms and let your immune system fight the virus.  Antibiotics will not help you get better quickly, and may give you side effects such as diarrhea and thrush. They can also lead to acquired C. diff. infections. They won’t stop your virus spreading to other people only YOU can do that with good hand hygiene.  Don’t ask for antibiotics , instead ask your doctor about the best way to treat your symptoms.   If you are prescribed antibiotics ask your doctor about the risks and benefits and always take them exactly as prescribed. Never take someone else’s antibiotics, always speak with your Primary Care Physician (PCP) or healthcare professional when symptoms linger or worsen.

Let us all take the “Resistance Fighter” Pledge and feel free to share the pledge with            everyone you know

I will not expect antibiotics for colds and flu as they have no effect on viruses.
I will take antibiotics as directed IF I am prescribed them, and not ask for them.
I will practice good hygiene, making hand washing #1, and help stop giving germs a free ride.

Now we can ALL spread knowledge, not infections and encourage others to join the fight against antibiotic resistance.

“Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work” CDC Campaign :

Get Smart About Antibiotics Week has been an annual effort to coordinate the work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. The campaign organized its first annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week in 2008. CDC’s Get Smart campaign, housed in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, collaborated with state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns and non-profit and for-profit partners. The success of the pilot year was measured by 1) dissemination of educational materials and messages, 2) partner satisfaction, and 3) media interest. A robust evaluation of the pilot week determined that each of these goals was met and exceeded. This was followed by other successful Get Smart About Antibiotics Week observances.

During November 14-20th, 2016 —  the Annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week will be observed. As in past years, the effort will coordinate work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. As with the past observances, messages and resources for improving antibiotic use in  healthcare settings from CDC’s Get Smart for Healthcare campaign will be included. Get Smart for Healthcare is a program housed in CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.

  • Ask your physician questions such as, “Do I really need an antibiotic?”
  • Bacteria only, not viruses (common cold, flu), can be killed by antibiotics.
  • Complete the entire course of prescribed antibiotics, even if you feel better midway through.

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacterial changes reduce or eliminate an antibiotic’s ability to kill the bacteria.

The Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC)  recommends the following:

  • Take antibiotics only and exactly as instructed by your healthcare provider.
  • Only take antibiotics prescribed for you.
  • Do not save or share antibiotics prescribed to you.
  • Do not pressure your healthcare provider to prescribe you antibiotics.

C. diff. Testing:  When a patient presents symptoms (diarrhea with abdominal cramping/pain, fatigue, fever) ordering a C. difficile stool test to rule out a C. diff. infection is beneficial, especially if the patient has been treated with antibiotics within ninety-days.

Environmental Safety:  Disinfecting a patient’s room, treated for a positive C. difficile infection, with a bleach or Federal EPA registered spore-killing product will help eliminate      C. difficile spores from being spread to another patient’s room.  Environmental safety is also an important matter in home-care.  Cleaning all high-touch areas in both long-term and acute care facilities, and home environments will help decrease the spread of this infection.  (High-touch surfaces: light switches, door knobs/handles, bed-side commodes, bathroom hand rails, commode, sink and sink handles, counter-tops, floors, bath-tubs, showers, canes, wheel-chairs, and all medical equipment in a patient’s room).

Personal Protection: ISOLATION: Visitors and Environmental professionals, wear proper personal protection equipment when treating and cleaning areas/rooms of a     C. difficile patient.  (gloves, gowns, shoe coverings, protective eye wear if using using spray solutions).

Patient Isolation:  Contact Precautions: Protect the patient and others by keeping a C. difficile patient in isolation in long-term and acute care facilities.  This will prevent the spread of infection to others and other areas within the facilities.

Communication:  If a patient is being transferred from either a long-term or acute care facility, communicate to the facility intake personnel the patient’s C. diff. infection and necessary infection control protocols to be implemented for the patient and other patient’s safety.

The CDC has been sharing public announcements regarding the use of Antibiotics for both healthcare professionals and patients alike.  Colds, Ear and Sinus symptoms may be caused by a virus, not bacteria.  Taking antibiotics to treat a virus makes antibiotic medications less effective when they are needed while raising the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Limit the use of Antibiotics to reduce the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection  (Bacterial infections and the treatment of symptoms will be determined and should be followed by the treating healthcare professionals). * November 17-23rd, 2014 join the CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign.

“None of us can do this alone…..all of us can do this together”

For additional C. difficile information, review the Infection Prevention categories available on the website :   http://www.cdifffoundation.org

 

 

 

Sources: CDC

Perspective and Key Issues Regarding Healthcare Textiles and Infection Prevention Q&A With Infection Control Today + Healthcare Laundry Accreditation Council

SAFETY

Infection Control Today (ICT) asked board members of the Healthcare Laundry Accreditation Council (HLAC) for their perspectives on key issues relating to infection prevention and healthcare textiles management.

 

 

Q: What are the gaps in research that are needed to advance healthcare textile science?
A: We view gaps as opportunities for advancements in healthcare textile science, and these opportunities are in large part being driven by infection prevention’s changing landscape. Growing drug resistance, the threat of pandemics and the cost of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) require that we gain a much better understanding of the morphology of organisms as it relates to their resistance and the chain of transmission. The list of infectious agents continues to grow and include prions, Clostridium difficile (C. diff.), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Ebola, etc. Each is unique and presents its own challenges for healthcare textiles, including the need to protect patient and staff from exposure situations (e.g., via personal protective equipment), assisting in patient-care activities (from exam gowns to incontinence products), and ultimately the need for them to be effectively cleaned/sanitized for reuse. The emergency guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for Ebola highlight the point: all items including textiles exposed to an Ebola patient must be incinerated. Though it is a very pragmatic and understandable decision, it is not an effective or sustainable one.
A better understanding of these infectious agents will allow for:
– The development of barrier fabrics that include chemical finishes that offer better and more specialized protection for the wearer
– Optimized cleaning and sanitizing conditions in the reprocessing of reusable products
– The use of scientifically based guidelines (not emotional ones) that effectively mitigate (not displace) infection risk in the handling contaminated textiles – (i.e., exposure of waste handlers vs. handling by trained reprocessing professionals).
— Bradley J. Bushman, vice president of technical affairs, Standard Textile Co. Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio

Q: What are the imperatives about proper healthcare laundry processes that infection preventionists (IPs) must know?
A: IPs must be well-versed in the end-to-end healthcare laundry process, especially in the context of potential infection risks from contaminated healthcare textiles (HCTs). Contamination risks extend well beyond the actual wash process. While it is imperative to have a validated wash process that consistently produces hygienically safe and clean textiles, close attention must be paid to the many contamination risks after the wash process. HCT contamination after the wash process is just as dangerous as contamination from improperly washed HCTs.
Key areas to look for potential HCT contamination include:
– Dirty finish surfaces that may touch clean HCTs
– Carts, after being loaded, that are improperly stored outside on a loading dock
– HCT transfer carts that are not protected from the environment via fluid-proof covers or doors
– Dirty hands of laundry workers handling clean HCTs
– Dirty/linty equipment used to process HCTs
– The presence of dirty/soiled HCTs in an area with clean HCT
– Contaminated air flowing into a clean HCT area.
Also, it’s imperative to ensure that laundry workers are well-trained in hygiene concepts such as proper hand hygiene; proper environmental cleaning; the importance of functional separation of soiled and clean; and proper HCT sorting, washing, drying, and finishing.
— Gregory Gicewicz, HLAC immediate past president; president, Sterile Surgical Systems, Tumwater, Wash.

Q: How important is it for healthcare laundry personnel to work with IPs and other stakeholders to achieve good outcomes?
A: It is very important. It’s essential to have open communication and collaboration between the healthcare IP and the laundry profession. There must be a sharing of knowledge and operational details, both the laundry operations and the healthcare facility operation, for each professional to be able to positively interact with each other.
The IP is involved in and responsible for observation, or surveillance, of aspects relating to both patient safety and infection prevention. This includes the collection and analysis of infection prevention and control data; review of products and procedures; follow-up on infection risk; prevention and control approaches; educational interventions to avoid or mitigate infection; and the application of changes mandated by regulatory and licensing agencies such as the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA). The more knowledge the IP has concerning the operations of a laundry, the more epidemiological principles can be applied to improve patient care outcomes.
In welcoming the IP, a bond can be established that allows both entities to address ongoing issues with desired outcomes. Utilizing observation to follow the laundry progression of textiles in a step-by-step process will enable the IP to determine if there are perceived breaches in the process and can share these concerns with the laundry operator and personnel. In turn, the healthcare laundry operator may notify the healthcare facility administration and IP of concerns they may encounter in the healthcare laundry.
— Joan Blanchard, RN, MSS, CNOR, CIC, infection prevention assistant, Littleton Adventist Hospital, Littleton, Colo.

Q: What are some ways that IPs can help facilitate dialogue and collaboration with healthcare laundry professionals?
A: We encourage IPs to have a strong, trusted partnership with their healthcare laundry vendor. A good practice is for the hospital IP team members to treat their healthcare laundry professionals as part of their extended team, where there’s an ongoing sharing of updates in infection control and prevention efforts and in the regulatory and licensing arenas. By establishing a working relationship with healthcare laundry personnel, problems that arise with the laundry process or the healthcare facility process can be more readily corrected and unresolved issues can be more directly addressed.
Important to this team-style relationship is for the IP to visit the healthcare laundry to become acquainted with the personnel responsible for administering the laundry. In fact, the laundry should be open to at least yearly visits from their IPs. These visits are more productive when they’re treated collaboratively. The purpose of visits is to ensure that the processes used by the healthcare laundry is safe and supported by research*. Utilizing HLAC’s Standards Checklist (available at www.hlacnet.org) as a guideline during these visits ensures that a thorough over-view of the laundry process is accomplished.
— Gregory Gicewicz, HLAC immediate past president; president, Sterile Surgical Systems, Tumwater, Wash.; and Joan Blanchard, RN, MSS, CNOR, CIC, infection prevention assistant, Littleton Adventist Hospital, Littleton, Colo.

Q: What are the unresolved key issues related to infection prevention and healthcare textiles that remain for the future?
A: Without education and awareness, the same myths about healthcare laundry that have persisted for a long time will continue. For example:
– Myth: The laundry industry is regulated – by someone.
– Myth: The laundry industry is regulated by the government.
– Myth: If the hospital is accredited then so is the laundry.
– Myth: All textiles are washed the same.
– Myth: When it comes to knowing all about laundry matters, the hospital IP is on top of it.
– Myth: Every healthcare laundry is accredited.
Only the education of healthcare professionals, including IPs, can overcome these myths.
Furthermore, in the expanding world of pathogens, we will continue to see more bacteria and viruses developing more lethal strains and antibiotics becoming less and less effective. HLAC believes that going forward we should be striving for a more robust, collaborative effort among healthcare laundries, IPs, environmental services, laundry departments, quality management, and healthcare resource and materials management professionals.
Another point: It’s not unrealistic for hospitals to begin to look at healthcare textiles as an investment in quality patient outcomes and not just an expense. Bear in mind that the processing of healthcare textiles is a reimbursable expense by CMS because healthcare textiles have a direct impact on patient outcomes.
Because of these issues, we believe that every laundry that is providing healthcare textile processing services should be HLAC-accredited. Doing so would ensure that all patients receive textiles that are processed to the highest level, thus safeguarding that three of the four major principles of medical ethics are afforded of all patients: Justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. We believe that there is a moral and ethical obligation to do the right thing for patients and processing healthcare textiles to the highest level possible helps to fulfill those obligations. We believe that working collaboratively, IPs and laundry operators will be key players in this process.
— Joan Blanchard, RN, MSS, CNOR, CIC, infection prevention assistant, Littleton Adventist Hospital, Littleton, Colo.; and John Scherberger, HLAC board president; president, Healthcare Risk Mitigation, Spartanburg, S.C.

References:
1. Centers for Medicare/Medicaid Services. CMS Hospital Infection Control Worksheet. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/GenInfo/Downloads/Survey-and-Cert-Letter-15-12-Attachment-1.pdf Accessed July 14, 2016.
2. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Toxic and Hazardous Substances: Bloodborne Pathogens, 29 CFR § 1030 (2012). Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
3. Siegel JD, Rhinehart E, Jackson M, Chierello L. the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Committee. 2007 Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing Transmission of Infectious Agents in Healthcare Settings. 2007.
4. Accreditation Standards for Processing Reusable Textiles for use in Healthcare Facilities. 2016 ed Frankfort, IL. Health care Laundry Accreditation Council. 2016.
5. Protecting Workers Families—DHHS(NIOSH) Pub No. 1002-113. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.
6. AINSI/AAMI ST65 2008/R 2013 Processing of Reusable Surgical Textiles for Use in Healthcare Facilities. 2013. Arlington, VA.: Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation: 2013.
7. Guideline for Surgical Attire. In: Guidelines for Perioperative. Denver, CO: AORN, Inc.: 2016.

RESOURCE:

http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/articles/2016/09/hlac-board-members-address-imperatives-related-to-healthcare-textiles.aspx

World Health Organization (WHO) Recommends Six-Step Hand-Hygiene Technique

Scientists reveal how to wash your hands: Research shows six step process is most efficient at killing bacteria.,  It turns out that just lathering your hands with soap, rubbing them vigorously for 20 seconds and rinsing is not the most effective way to clean them.
Experts now say the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is far more superior than a rival three step process.

https://youtu.be/XedODzGrmic

During the randomized controlled trial in an urban, acute-care teaching hospital, researchers observed 42 physicians and 78 nurses completing hand-washing using an alcohol-based hand rub after delivering patient care. The six-step technique was determined to be microbiologically more effective for reducing the median bacterial count (3.28 to 2.58) compared to the three-step method (3.08 to 2.88). However, using the six-step method required 25 percent more time to complete (42.50 seconds vs. 35 seconds).

 

HOW TO PROPERLY WASH YOUR HANDS WITH THE SIX-STEP TECHNIQUE  

1. To properly wash your hands using the superior six-step method begin by wetting hands with water and grab either a dollop of soap or hand rub.

2. Begin rubbing your palms together with your fingers closed, then together with fingers interlaced.

3. Move your right palm over left dorsum with interlaced fingers and vice versa – make sure to really rub in between your fingers.

4. Then interlock your fingers and rub the back of them by turning your wrist in a half circle motion.

5. Clasp your left thumb in your right palm and rub in in a rotational motion from the tip of your fingers to the end of the thumb, then switch hands.

6. And finally scrub the inside of your right hand with your left fingers closed and the other hand.

 

‘Only 65 percent of providers completed the entire hand hygiene process despite participants having instructions on the technique in front of them and having their technique observed.’

 

SixStepHands

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resourece:

(1)  http://www.shea-online.org/View/ArticleId/409/Six-Step-Hand-Washing-Technique-Found-Most-Effective-for-Reducing-Bacteria.aspx

 

Seal Shield LLC, A Healthcare Technology Company, Introduces SKY™ To Their Family Of UVC Sanitizers, Designed To Kill Bacteria and Viruses On Hard To Clean Consumer Electronics

sealshieldlogo

 

 

Seal Shield LLC (Jacksonville, FL), today will demonstrate the SKY™ family of UV Sanitizers at the CES- Consumer Electronics Show, Sands Booth #73213. 

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The SKY™ is the world’s first UV Sanitizer to kill more than 99.95% of pathogens in less than 30 seconds. Designed for use in hospitals to protect patients and practitioners from dangerous cross contamination infections, the Sky is also the perfect solution for mobile retailers and IT / MIS professionals who service and support mobile devices of unknown or dubious origins.

Tablet computers and smart phones have been proven to harbor harmful bacteria and viruses. A study published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology warns that “twenty to thirty percent of viruses can be readily transferred from a fingertip to a glass surface, like that on a touch screen.”

“Mobile device hygiene is imperative in today’s pathogen rich environments. SKY™ was designed to be easy to use, and it can safely disinfect virtually any mobile device in under 30 seconds,” states Seal Shield CEO, Brad Whitchurch.

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The Seal Shield SKY™ is currently available in 2 models.

The SKY™ 6Xi features a horizontal orientation, ideal for desktop applications.

The SKY™ 7Xi features vertical orientation and can be wall mounted or placed on a mobile cart.

The SKY™ sanitizers are the latest additions to Seal Shield’s family of UV infection prevention devices which include the ElectroClave™ and MoonBean™ UV sanitizers.

Seal Shield is a world leader in infection control technology. Seal Shield designs, develops and manufactures medical grade, infection prevention technology for hospitals and the home including UV sanitizers, air purification systems, antimicrobial products, waterproof keyboards, mice and TV remote controls.

 

For more information please visit http://www.SealShield.com/

 

To read article in its entirety:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-sanitizers-for-smart-phones-and-tablets-can-reduce-the-spread-of-super-bugs-in-under-30-seconds-300199923.html?tc=eml_cleartime&utm_source=NetSuite+Contacts&utm_campaign=f41fd750a2-SKY%2FCES16&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e25719ba34-f41fd750a2-102891281

C. difficile, a leading Healthcare-Associated Infection, Brings Together World Topic Experts At the International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO in Boston, MA on November 9th

 2015 International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference & Health EXPO

Boston, MA, USA   ~    November 9th

7:30 a.m – 5:00 p.m

conferencesanjuanprJoin us at our 3rd annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO on November 9th.  Not just another educational conference but one that pairs
world-renowned topic experts with presentations on state-of-the-art health care topics pertaining to a leading Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI); C. difficile

*Prevention
*Treatments
*Research
*Prevention and Treatment Clinical trials and studies
*Microbiome research
*Infection Prevention
*Environmental Safety
*Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
……………………..and much more.

The panel of world-renowned topic experts will also discuss the burden of C. diff. the risk factors pertaining to current and emerging treatment options along with the importance of applying evidence-based clinical approaches to the prevention of  a C. diff. infection (CDI), one of the leading Hospital-Acquired Infections.

Clostridium difficile (also known as C. diff.) is an important cause of infectious disease death in the United States.  Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). • More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes alone.*  Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection.   Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a  C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.  (Source: CDC)

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Conference Venue:

Double Tree Suites Hotel – Boston – Cambridge
400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston, MA  02134  USA
1-617-783-0090 For Hotel Accommodations *   * There are hotel accommodations available for Sunday evening offered at a special event rate for guests of the C Diff Foundation.  Please inform the DoubleTree representative at the time of creating a reservation to receive the special event room rate.

Exclusive Admission:   $75.00

Student Admission:     $50.00

Each exclusive and student ticket includes admission to all presentations, formal and informal Q&A sessions, introductions to fellow healthcare professionals, continental breakfast  (7:30 a.m.) , a plated four course luncheon with the choice of Chicken Florentine or Petite Filet Mignon main entree, Access to the Health EXPO, a conference book, a educational DVD, and formal conference program.  

To Register and obtain tickets, please click on the following link

NOTE:  *Presentations should not be recorded audio or video or published without prior written and signed permission from the guest speaker and addressed by each attendee seeking publication of said presentations.

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Guest Speakers

Key Speaker and Conference Chair:  Professor Mark Wilcox;  Professor of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, UK. Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile for the Public Health England. He has formerly been the Director of Infection Prevention, Infection Control Doctor and Clinical Director of Pathology at Leeds Teaching Hospitals.

Dr. John Bartlett, MD; Assistant Professor Medicine, UCLA/Sepulveda Veterans Admin Hospital 1972-5, Associate Professor and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, 1975-80, Professor of Medicine and Chair Division of Infectious Diseases Division, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 1980 – 2006; Professor of Medicine, 2006 – 13; Professor of Medicine emeritus, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2013.Dominant research interests: anaerobic infections and pulmonary infections 1968 – 74; community acquired pneumonia and diagnostic methods, 1974-1980; Bowel prep for elective colon surgery; Protected bronchoscopy brush catheter-1977; Clostridium difficile 1977 – 84, HIV 1983 – 2014; bioterrorism 1999 –2004; Clostridium difficile infection, HIV/AIDS and antibiotic resistance 2006-2013 with  Major current interests: Clostridium difficile infection, HIV infection, antibiotic resistance, careers in infectious diseases.
Presentation Topic: “The discovery of Clostridium difficile as the cause of antibiotic-associated colitis.”

Professor Simon M. Cutting, Professor of Molecular Microbiology at Royal Holloway, University of London is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His D.Phil was on understanding the genetic control of spore formation in Bacillus. After spending 7 years in the renowned laboratory of Professor Richard Losick at Harvard University Biological Laboratories (USA) he spent 3 years as an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in Philadelphia. He returned to the UK in 1996 and since then has worked on developing bacterial spores as novel oral vaccines at
Royal Holloway, University of London. The Cutting lab has developed a number of prototype oral vaccines and is now entering a ‘first in man’ phase 1/IIa clinical trial of a prototype oral vaccine to 
Clostridium difficile (see www.cdvax.org). His other expertise is in the use of Bacillus spores as probiotics and has a number of contracts and consultancies with European and US companies in the food and feed sectors 
(see SporeGen.com).
Presentation Topic: “Mucosal Vaccination: Decolonisation is Essential to Full Protection Against C. difficile

Dr. Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc   Anesthesiologist/Intensive Care physician in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. He is also Assistant Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. Dr. Quraishi’s overall research goal is to better define how macro- and micro-nutrient status influence outcomes during acute stress and critical illness. In particular, his research group has focused on the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D in the perioperative setting, during acute care hospitalization, and for patients in the intensive care unit. Recently, Dr. Quraishi’s group has identified vitamin D status as a potentially modifiable risk factor for hospital acquired C. diff infections and that the severity of C. Diff infections may also be related to vitamin D status .
Presentation Topic:  “Vitamin D as nutritional immunomodulation
for Clostridium difficile infections.”

Dr. Mary Beth Dorr , Phd, studied Pharmacy at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and received a PhD in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism from the University of North Carolina. For the last 28 years Dr. Dorr has worked in the pharmaceutical industry in various capacities, with the majority of the time devoted to the design and implementation of Phase 1 to 4 clinical trials, primarily for anti-infective products.  Prior to joining Merck, Dr. Dorr directed several large, international clinical studies of the efficacy and safety of two IV antibiotics, Synercid and dalbavancin.  She also directed clinical research programs for gastrointestinal and women’s health products.  Mary Beth joined Merck in February 2011 and is currently a Clinical Director in the Late Stage Clinical Development Department as the Clinical Monitor directing 2 large pivotal Phase 3 trials investigating the safety and efficacy of the monoclonal antibodies actoxumab and bezlotoxumab as adjunctive therapy for the prevention of C. difficile recurrence.
Presentation Topic: Bezlotoxumab for Prevention of Recurrent C. difficile Infection in Patients on Standard of Care Antibiotics:  Results of Phase 3 Trials (MODIFY I and MODIFY II)

Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC
Dr. Hudson Garrett is currently employed as the VP, Clinical Affairs for PDI and NIce-Pak, and is responsible for the global Clinical Affairs program and also the Medical Science Liaison program for all divisions within the company. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology/Chemistry and Nursing, a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular assess, moderate sedation, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.
Presentation Topic:  Preventing Clostridium difficile thru Antibiotic Stewardship

Dr. David Cook, PhD;  A scientist and entrepreneur who has held senior operating and management positions in the biotechnology industry over his 20-year career. Before joining Seres Therapeutics, he was the chief operating officer for the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, a global R&D organization whose mission is to develop a safe, globally accessible vaccine for HIV. Prior to IAVI, David was the founding CEO at Anza Therapeutics, a biotechnology start-up developing a novel microbial vaccine platform to induce cellular immune responses to fight or prevent diseases such as cancer, hepatitis C, malaria and tuberculosis. He is also a co-inventor on over twenty-five patents. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and his PhD in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr Cook is presently Executive Vice President of R&D, Chief Scientific Officer with Seres Therapeutics, Inc.. Presentation Topic: “The role of the microbiome in resisting
C. difficile infection and the mechanism of Ecobiotic drugs.”

Julie Gubb, PhD, CIC,   has worked in the field of Infection Prevention in varying roles at healthcare facilities in multiple states for more than two decades. After graduating from the University of Detroit Mercy with a degree in Medical Technology, she began her career as Senior Clinical Microbiologist at an acute care hospital in Detroit, Michigan, where she developed an interest in Infection Control while managing the activities of a full-service microbiology laboratory. She was the Director of Infection Control at Mount Clemens Regional Medical Center in Michigan, and has also held positions in Infection Prevention at healthcare facilities in California and Nevada. As a Senior Infection Preventionist for Xenex, Julie works closely with hospitals throughout the United States to understand their infection prevention goals and develop strategies for attaining those goals. As an active member of the national organization Association for Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology (APIC), she has maintained Board Certification in Infection Control and Epidemiology since 1993 and speaks frequently at APIC chapter meetings.
Presentation Topic: Stand Up for Cleanliness / Enhanced Room Disinfection

Dr. Patricia J. Freda Pietrobon, PhD: Associate Vice President, R&D,
Sanofi Pasteur, has over 25 years of experience in the Vaccine & Diagnostic industries and more then 20 years in leadership roles focusing on research & development of new vaccines. Patricia began her career in diagnostic assay development with a focus on validation and quality alignment to regulatory requirements and GXPs. Patricia has been with Sanofi Pasteur for over 25 years and has contributed to the development and licensure of new bacterial & viral vaccines for pediatric & adult populations worldwide.

Barley Chironda, Manager of Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) and Medical Device Reprocessing Device at St. Joseph Health Centre in Toronto, Canada. He is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC TM) and has worked extensively as an Infection Preventionist. Barely has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral changes.   Barley’s presentation will show a behind the scenes account of the C. diff. management from the healthcare facilities perspective while providing a call to action.

Dr. Martha Clokie, PhD, Leicester UK, Professor in Microbiology.  Dr. Cloakie’s research focuses on phages that infect bacterial pathogens of medical relevance and  has published 41 papers in this area. Her major focus has been on Clostridium difficile where she has  isolated a large phage collection. In vitro and in vivo data has shown that the viruses have therapeutic potential. A patent has been filed  on these phages and  working with AmpliPhi to develop a product. Dr. Cloakie  has regular contact with the BBC and other media to talk about her work, and other phage projects, and has consulted with Science museum, London and Eden Project, UK to advise on bacteriophage displays.

Lee Jones, Founder, President and CEO of Rebiotix Inc, has over thirty years of experience in the medical technology industry in large and small companies and academia. Most recently Lee was Chief Administrative Officer of the Schulze Diabetes Institute at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN and is the former president and chief executive officer of Inlet Medical. Inlet Medical was sold to Cooper Surgical in 2006. Lee will introduce Rebiotix Inc.,  a biotechnology company founded in 2011 in Roseville, MN to revolutionize the treatment of challenging gastrointestinal diseases by harnessing the power of the human microbiome The company is developing an entirely new kind of biological drug designed to reverse pathogenic processes responsible for disease through the transplantation of live human-derived microbes into a sick person’s intestinal tract.
Presentation Topic:  Blazing a Trail with the Gut Microbiome

Professor Nancy Sheridan,   a C. diff. Survivor and  Associate Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology and a winner of the prestigious SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Professor Sheridan will share her personal experience being treated for a painful and extended journey with a C. diff. infection (CDI).  Professor Sheridan has been teaching since fall 2000 in the Fashion Merchandising Management Department within the School of Business and Technology. For the past seven years, she has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton Business School to undergraduate and MBA students.

Dr Mel Thomson, PhD,  completed her Honors degree in microbiology and immunology at the University of Melbourne . She then immigrated to the UK where she worked on various projects as diverse as allergy and cancer before undertaking further studies. She completed a Masters of Research in functional genomics before reading for a PhD in microbial genetic regulation in Neisseria species, both at University of York, UK. After the award of her PhD, Dr Thomson became interested the host-pathogen interactions at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK.  Dr Thomson returned to Australia in 2011 to start her own research group studying host-pathogen interactions in the GI tract, at Deakin Medical School. A passionate science communicator, and has recently become a national ‘torch bearer’ for the concept of crowd funding academic research, which a track record of three successful ‘Pozible’ crowd funding campaigns, ‘Mighty Maggots’, ‘Hips 4 Hipsters’ and ‘No more Poo Taboo’
Presentation Topic: All that glitters is C.diff awareness gold and Crowdfunding: The ‘No more poo taboo’ animation”

Dr Rahma Wehelie – LifeClean International AB – Sweden; LifeClean International AB is a Swedish company with an international orientation that conducts research, development, and production in the spore, bacteria, and virus eliminating industry. LifeClean was established in 2013 after many years of research and the headquarter lies in Uddevalla, Sweden.
Presentation Topic: Dr Wehelie will be discussing LifeClean’s research, development and production eliminating Clostridium difficile, Norovirus, and other multidrug-resistant bacteria

Dr. Klaus Gottlieb, MD, FACG,Synthetic Biologics, Inc.,Vice President, Clinical;Regulatory Affairs   Dr. Gottlieb is an experienced board-certified internist and gastroenterologist with a strong clinical science, business and drug development background. He joined Synthetic Biologics after serving as Senior Medical Director-Therapeutic Strategy Lead Gastroenterology of Quintiles, a Fortune 500 company and the world’s largest provider of biopharmaceutical development and commercial outsourcing services. At Quintiles, Dr. Gottlieb served as Global Medical Advisor for three separate large Phase 3 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) trials and provided significant input on the shaping, design and evaluation of numerous IBD and other gastrointestinal (GI) clinical trials throughout all stages of development programs. Prior to joining Quintiles in 2013, he was with the FDA in Silver Spring, MD as a Senior Clinical Reviewer for the Division of Gastroenterology and Inborn Errors Products. Widely published, his academic contributions have been recognized by an appointment as Professor of Medicine (Clinical) at George Washington University and the following elected fellowships: Fellow American College of Physicians, Fellow American College of Gastroenterology, Fellow American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.  Presentation Topic: Protecting the Gut Microbiome

For additional information contact the C Diff Foundation: (919) 201-1512 or
info@cdifffoundation.org

To Register and obtain tickets, please click on the following link

We would like to sincerely thank the following Exclusive and Supporting Corporate Sponsors for their continued support  and joining the Foundation in
Raising C. diff. Awareness worldwide.

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Trinity Guardion Bed Protection System Proven To Reduce C. diff., A Healthcare-Associated Infection, By 50%

NewspaperII IN THE NEWS………….

Trinity Guardion was selected by Xavier University’s Center for Innovation to present their Bed Protection System, which is proven to reduce a Hospital Acquired C.diff infection by 50%, at Healthovate! Summit on Thursday, June 11. The 2015

Xavier Center for Innovation (CFI) Healthovate! Summit is co-sponsored by Intel-GE Care Innovations™. “Trinity Guardion is the world’s only manufacturer of launderable bed covers specifically engineered to eliminate bacteria, spores and viruses from a hospital bed mattress. I’m excited to present this patented technology with over 6 years of research behind it to this esteemed group of innovators,” states Bruce Rippe, Trinity Guardion’s Chief Operating Officer.

Healthovate! Summits give healthcare leaders an opportunity to share their expertise and engage in conversations with other leaders from other industries. Trinity Guardion will also be presenting at similar events in Boston (July 31), Chicago (Oct 5), and Nashville (Oct 28). “Our mission at the CFI is to use innovation to solve complex problems. I can’t think of a more important challenge facing our society than how we keep people healthy, while reducing costs and improving overall well-being,” said Shawn Nason, Chief Innovation Officer at Xavier University. “By bringing together a diverse community of people, all committed to health, I am confident we can find meaningful solutions and innovative technologies and systems that will transform the healthcare industry—not to mention better ways to educate and prepare students to work in and lead healthcare in the future.”

Over 40 area start-up hospitals, universities, national organizations, healthcare professionals, and Xavier alumni will learn how this innovative mattress cover acts as a barrier to prevent bacteria and fluids, which can be harbored in a hospital mattress as a result of ineffective cleaning, from coming in contact with a patient. Due to its abilities in preventing viruses such as Ebola and other bacteria from penetrating through the cover, hospitals have begun to implement the covers in their infection control wards. Last year, the innovative technology of the Trinity Bed Protection System was recognized when the honorable mention for the 2014 NALTH Goldberg Innovation Award was awarded to St. Vincent Seton Specialty Hospital, Indianapolis for their use of the mattress cover in their facility.

Tested in two Midwestern hospitals, the Trinity Bed Protection System does not impede bed operation or any clinical aspects of the underlying mattress. In fact, it helps reduce terminal clean time, while improving asset life of the bed.

The Trinity Bed Protection System from Trinity Guardion makes bed surfaces cleaner for every person every time.

About Trinity Guardion: Trinity Guardion is the result of an international collaboration of scientists, doctors and academic professionals in the healthcare industry, united in the concern that hospital beds are not clean. This concern was corroborated by peer reviewed research that is available upon request. The product line includes mattress covers for most brands of hospital beds, therapy tables and pillow cases.