Tag Archives: Antibiotic news

A Study Provides Data That Between 2010 and 2011 Throughout U.S. At Least 30 Percent of Antibiotics Unnecessarily Prescribed

Antibiotics Unnecessarily Prescribed!

At least 30 percent of antibiotics are unnecessarily prescribed, contributing to the rise of debilitating and sometimes deadly bacteria-resistant superbugs, according to a study released Tuesday – May 3, 2016.

To reach this conclusion, researchers tracked antibiotic use in doctors’ offices and emergency departments between 2010 and 2011 throughout the United States. The study results were published in Journal of the American Medical Association by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention along with Pew Charitable Trusts.

The findings showed that doctors needlessly wrote prescriptions for viruses, such as the common cold, viral sore throats and other ailments that can’t be cured with antibiotics. More than 47 million excess prescriptions put patients in harm’s way for allergic reactions and superbugs, such as Clostridium difficile, or C. diff.

“The rampant misuse of antibiotics is probably the leading infectious disease public health threat the world faces,” Dr. Amesh Adalja, a UPMC infectious disease specialist, said after learning of the study results. “The spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the infections they cause are a crisis and, if allowed to continue, will drag civilization back decades.”

Superbugs kill 23,000 Americans a year and sicken 2 million, according to the CDC.

Last year, the White House set its sights on superbugs, releasing a plan to combat the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The plan’s goal is to reduce outpatient antibiotic use by 50 percent and inpatient use by 20 percent by 2020.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://triblive.com/news/adminpage/10409989-74/antibiotics-antibiotic-doctors

Two leading CDC Physicians discuss current issues focused on C. difficile infections (CDI) and Antibiotic usage, Tuesday, May 5th on C. diff. Spores and More, C diff Radio

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C. diff. Spores and More”

UPCOMING SHOW:  Tuesday, May 5th: 

Two leading CDC Physicians discuss current issues focused on C. diff.Infections and Antibiotic usage.

 

Join us as we learn from our guests;

Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC with main interests in epidemiology and prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and the prevention of antimicrobial resistance,

AND
Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD, Associate Director for Healthcare-Associated Infection prevention programs in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease. Listen in as these two stellar Physicians discuss the topics of Clostridium difficile infections and Antibiotic usage, two important issues with potential solutions facing the citizens on a global level.

Guest Bio’s:

Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University.  Past positions have included Associate Investigator at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan and Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville. Dr. McDonald is a former Epidemic Intelligence Service officer and former Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he currently serves as the Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity.  He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology and prevention of healthcare-associated infections, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and the prevention of antimicrobial resistance.

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD, is Associate Director for healthcare-associated infection prevention programs in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Dr. Srinivasan is also a captain in the US Public Health Service. An infectious disease doctor, Dr. Srinivasan oversees several CDC programs aimed at eliminating healthcare-associated infections and improving antibiotic use. For much of his CDC career, Dr. Srinivasan ran the healthcare outbreak investigation unit, helping hospitals and other healthcare facilities track down bacteria and stop them from infecting other patients. Today, Dr. Srinivasan leads CDC’s work to improve antibiotic prescribing and works with a team of CDC experts researching new strategies to eliminate healthcare-associated infections.

 

http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Obama Administration Issues Detailed Plan National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

The Obama administration has issued a detailed plan to address the problem of antibiotic resistance, complete with milestones to help ensure the goals are actively addressed.

Drug-resistant bacteria cause 23,000 deaths and two million illnesses a year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Resistance also threatens animal health and agriculture, said the White House.

The 63-page National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, released                     March 27, 2015 was developed by a task force made up of representatives from at least a dozen federal agencies. The task force began meeting in September 2014, taking its cues from an executive order issued by President Obama on September 18, 2014, and from recommendations in a report on antibiotic resistance that was issued by the President’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology around the same time.

The action plan aims “to enhance domestic and international capacity to prevent and contain outbreaks of antibiotic-resistant infections; maintain the efficacy of current and new antibiotics; and develop and deploy next-generation, diagnostics, antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutics,” according to the White House.

Five Goals

The plan sets 1-, 3-, and 5-year targets in each of the five overarching goals, which are to:

  • slow the emergence of resistant bacteria and prevent the spread of resistant infections;
  • strengthen national one-health surveillance efforts to combat resistance (the “one-health” approach to disease surveillance integrates data from multiple monitoring networks, according to the White House);
  • advance development and use of rapid and innovative diagnostic tests for the identification and characterization of resistant bacteria;
  • accelerate basic and applied research and development for new antibiotics, other therapeutics, and vaccines; and
  • improve international collaboration and capacities for antibiotic resistance prevention, surveillance, control, and antibiotic research and development.

Having specific benchmarks is something that the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has advocated, said Amanda Jezek, vice president of public policy and government relations at IDSA. “That helps ensure that this isn’t just an action plan that will sit on the shelf and collect dust,” Jezek told Medscape Medical News.

Hospitals will be required to implement programs to increase infection controls, such as judiciously washing hands, hospital surfaces and equipment, and reducing the use of antibiotics in patients.

Doctors working with the government’s Medicare and Medicaid health plans will be required to report their prescribing patterns for antibiotics, particularly when used to treat non-bacterial infections, such as common colds.

The plan calls for CDC to increase its screening of people arriving from countries with high rates of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. The CDC currently screens 500,000 such arrivals per year, and the plan calls for doubling that within five years.

 

Urgent and Serious

Among other targets, the plan sets goals for eradicating pathogens that have been labeled urgent or serious threats by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The 2020 targets include:

  • a 50% reduction from 2011 estimates in the incidence of Clostridium difficile,
  • a 60% reduction in hospital-acquired Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections,
  • a 35% reduction in hospital-acquired multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas species infections, and
  • a 50% reduction from 2011 estimates in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

Also by 2020, the action plan seeks a 50% reduction in inappropriate antibiotic use in outpatient settings and a 20% reduction in inpatient settings, as well as routine reporting of antibiotic use and resistance data to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Healthcare Safety Network by 95% of Medicare-eligible hospitals.

The plan also envisions by 2020 the development and wide dissemination of rapid diagnostic tests that can be used in a physician’s office or at the hospital bedside to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections, and thus help ensure more appropriate use of therapeutics.

Under research and development, the plan calls for the characterization of the gut microbiome of at least one animal species raised for food to potentially treat bacterial diseases without antibiotics, and at least three new probiotic therapies for animals by 2020.

In the same time frame, the plan dictates the development of at least two new drug candidates or nontraditional therapeutics and/or vaccines for the prevention of human disease.

The action plan also outlines proposals to work with other governments around the world to enhance the capacity to identify resistant pathogens and to help low- and middle-income countries develop stewardship plans.

$1 Billion to Start?

The White House said the plan’s aspirations are “consistent” with the president’s fiscal 2016 budget proposal, which seeks more than $1 billion to combat antibiotic resistance.

Jezek, from the IDSA, said the $1 billion is a good start and notes that there is bipartisan support for battling antibiotic resistance. “To me, the big question is, Can we get Congress to actually allocate all of that money?” she said.

The automatic budget cuts known as sequestration loom large over any request for funds that are not for mandatory programs, which could make it hard to get the full 2016 request from lawmakers, said Jezek.

The IDSA is also calling on the federal government to ensure the establishment of antibiotic stewardship programs in all healthcare facilities and to pass incentives to encourage drug, diagnostic, and vaccine development.

The federal interagency task force is scheduled to provide a progress report on the action plan within 6 months of its release — by September. It will then make annual progress reports and make recommendations to modify goals if necessary.

The task force is also supposed to work in conjunction with the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic Resistance, a 30-member board that has yet to be constituted.

To read article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://news.yahoo.com/white-house-crafts-first-ever-plan-fight-superbugs-215855870–finance.html;_ylt=AwrBT9znhBVVhrYAkr1XNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEza2JuOW9lBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDVklQNTk2XzEEc2VjA3Nj

New Antibiotic may treat “superbugs”

Microscope - 5Bacterial infections are hard to fight. It’s not just that there are superbugs which resist antibiotics, like MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus)  – it is that the methods for finding effective antibiotics aren’t very efficient.

“The compound is highly potent against a broad range of Gram-positive microbes, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE),” the company said in a statement.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than two million people are infected by drug-resistant germs each year, and 23,000 die of their infections. The biggest killer by far in the U.S. is diarrhea-causing C. difficile.

However, scientists have developed a technique that harnesses environmental bacteria to find antimicrobial weapons much more quickly. Their approach uses a mix of moistened soil, liquid agar (bacterial culture) and diluted bacterial samples to isolate microbes for study while giving them the natural conditions they need to grow. At least in theory, medical researchers no longer have to limit their antibiotic development to bacteria that survive in lab conditions. If it grows in dirt, it’s a candidate.

The team behind the new method has already produced a very promising antibiotic, teixobactin.

It not only kills certain kinds of harmful bacteria (namely those with cellular walls, like anthrax and tuberculosis), but makes it difficult for those bugs to evolve resistance. It’ll be a while before teixobactin is a practical treatment, and it won’t be useful in many other circumstances. But that’s almost beside the point — thanks to the new research technique, it’s no longer far fetched to think that humans can stay one step ahead of sickness-inducing organisms.

For additional information; click on the link below:

www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/common-dirt-new-antibiotic-may-conquer-superbugs-n281011