Tag Archives: C. difficile prevention

Community-acquired C. diff. Infection (CA-CDI)

How is Clostridioides difficile epidemiology changing?

 

What risk factors are associated with community-acquired C. diff (CA-CDI)?

How has molecular epidemiology improved our understanding of Cdiff transmission?

What are the potential novel sources of Cdiff?

Investigators with Duke University Medical Center certainly asked the right questions in “Novel and Emerging Sources of Clostridioides difficile Infection,” a new study published December 19 in PLOS Pathogens.

The global answer is that infection preventionists and other infection control professionals will have their work cut out for them in the coming year. They’ll have to contend with diversity among C. diff isolates, mounting evidence that it’s often transmitted outside the hospital, and that those multiple sources of infection will put current infection control processes to the test. Coming up with the best approach will take lots of exposure-related data, coupled with whole-genome sequencing.

“With the additional issues of widespread outpatient healthcare contact, asymptomatic carriage, and long-term environmental persistence of spores, even the basic distinction between community- versus healthcare-associated CDI may become less relevant with time,” the study states.

Mathematical modeling studies suggest reducing transmission would require that patients with C. diff be placed in single rooms and the healthcare workers who care for them wear gowns and gloves. Clinical data supporting this method are missing, however. “Molecular epidemiologic studies attribute a relatively small minority of transmission events to carriers,” the study states.

It’s more of a challenge to investigate CA-CDI than healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). There aren’t even that many population-based studies on CDI incidence, say, investigators.

Which population is most at risk?

And how does the healthcare system go about tracking it?

These questions have not been answered and don’t look to be answered anytime soon.

“One of the major issues with defining populations at risk for CA-CDI is a lack of centralized testing or surveillance,” the study states. “Because patients are able to present to urgent care, primary care offices, emergency rooms, and hospitals, often all belonging to different healthcare networks, it is extremely difficult to determine how many cases are occurring within a particular community.”

The fact that most C. diff interventions occur within the hospital also limits what can be done about CA-CDI. It’s also unclear just how the infection travels: from the community into the hospital, the other way around, or some combination of both?

Also, “even though healthcare contact is frequently associated with CA-CDI, it remains unclear if this reflects patients who are actually at elevated risk because of multiple chronic health problems or if contact with healthcare is truly what is driving the risk.”

Nursing homes and long-term care facilities seem to be breeding grounds for C. diff and may be a major source of C. diff infection in hospitals because many of the residents in those latter facilities often wind up in the hospital.

“With the additional issues of widespread outpatient healthcare contact, asymptomatic carriage, and long-term environmental persistence of spores, even the basic distinction between community- versus healthcare-associated CDI may become less relevant with time.

Given the challenges posed by current evidence of interspecies transmission and environmental reservoirs of Cdifficile, future research in C. difficile prevention will require an integrative multidisciplinary approach, as exemplified by the OneHealth concept.”

To view this article in its entirety, please click on the following link to be redirected.  Thank You.

https://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/hai-types/c-diff-conundrum-sources-harder-pin-down-making-control-difficult

Infection Prevention – Patient Safety – Prior And During A Hospital Stay

This is a patient – safety article and quite informative and beneficial for everyone.  The topics are highlighted on how to prevent infections prior and during a hospital stay.

 

The most pertinent information to review and share with others is as follows:

1. Check Up on Your Hospital
See how it compares with others on central line, C. diff, and MRSA infections, as well as other measures of patient safety. To compare hospitals in your area at preventing infections, use our hospital ratings.

2. Have a Friend or Family Member With You
That person can act as your advocate, ask questions, and keep notes. A Consumer Reports survey of 1,200 recently hospitalized people found that those who had a companion were 16 percent more likely to say that they had been treated respectfully by medical personnel. The most important times to have a companion for preventing infections and other medical errors are on nights, weekends, and holidays, when staff is reduced, and when shifts change.

3. Keep a Record
Keep a pad and pen nearby so that you can note what doctors and nurses say, which drugs you get, and questions you have. If you spot something worrisome, such as a drug you don’t recognize, take a note or snap a picture on your phone. You can also use your phone to record thoughts or conversations with staff. Though some may object, “explain that you are recording so you remember later,” McGiffert says.

4. Insist on Clean Hands
Ask everyone who enters your room whether they’ve washed their hands with soap and water. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer is not enough to destroy certain bacteria, such as the dangerous C. diff. Don’t hesitate to say: “I’m sorry, but I didn’t see you wash your hands. Would you mind doing it again?”

https://cdifffoundation.org/hand-washing-updates/

 

5. Keep It Clean
Bring bleach wipes for bed rails, doorknobs, the phone, and the TV remote, all of which can harbor bacteria. And if your room looks dirty, ask that it be cleaned.

6. Cover Wounds
Some hospitals examine incisions daily for infection, but opening the bandage exposes the area to bacteria. Newer techniques—sealing the surgical site with skin glue (instead of staples, which can harbor bacteria) and waterproof dressings that stay on for one to three weeks without opening—are effective at preventing infection.

7. Inquire Whether IVs and Catheters Are Needed
Ask every day whether central lines, urinary catheters, or other tubes can be removed. The longer they’re left in place, the greater the infection risk.

8. Ask About Antibiotics
For many surgeries, you should get an antibiotic 60 minutes before the operation. But research suggests that the type of antibiotic used or the timing of when it’s administered is wrong in up to half of cases.

Listen to one of the educational Podcasts:  Using antibiotics wisely, How to help in the fight against antibiotic resistance  with Guests Dr. Arjun Srinivassan, MD and Dr. Lauri Hicks, DO

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/93656/encore-using-antibiotics-wisely-how-you-can-help-in-the-fight-against-antibiotic-resistance

9. Postpone Surgery If You Have an Infection
That increases your risk of developing a new infection and worsening an existing one. So if you have any other type of infection—say, an abscessed tooth—then the surgery should be postponed, if possible, until it’s completely resolved.

10. Say No to Razors
Removing hair from the surgical site is often necessary, but doing that with a regular razor can cause nicks that provide an opening for bacteria. The nurse should use an electric trimmer instead.

11. Question the Need for Heartburn Drugs
Some patients enter the hospital taking heartburn drugs such as Nexium, lansoprazole (Prevacid) or omeprazole (Prilosec) or are prescribed one after they’re admitted. But these drugs, called proton-pump inhibitors, increase the risk of intestinal infections and pneumonia, so consider stopping them before admission and, once there, ask whether you really need one.

12. Test for MRSA
Ask your surgeon to screen you for MRSA, a potentially deadly bacteria that’s resistant to antibiotics, either before you enter or on admission, so that you can address the problem and hospital staff can take extra steps to protect you and others.

13. Watch for Diarrhea
Get tested for C. diff. infection  if you have three loose stools within 24 hours. If you test positive, expect extra precautions for preventing infections from spreading to others.

14. Quit Smoking, Even Temporarily
You won’t be allowed to smoke in the hospital anyway, and stopping as long as possible beforehand cuts the risk of infection. Read our advice on how to stop smoking.

15. Wash Up the Night Before Surgery
Ask about taking precautions before entering the hospital, such as bathing with special soap or using antiseptic wipes.

To read the article in its entirety click on the following link to be redirected:

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

T

Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

###

Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

Michael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

Follow us on Twitter
@cdiffFoundation
#Cdiff2016

European Patent Office Has Granted European Patent Which Provides Composition Of Matter Coverage For Synthetic Biologics’ ribaxamase

Synthetic Biologics; a clinical stage company focused on developing therapeutics to protect the gut microbiome announced on July 12, 2016  that the European Patent Office has granted European Patent No. 2576776 which provides composition of matter coverage for ribaxamase, the Company’s Phase 2 drug candidate designed to degrade certain IV beta-lactam antibiotics within the GI tract and maintain the natural balance of the gut microbiome for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms.

This is Synthetic Biologics’ first patent directly pertaining to ribaxamase in Europe and adds to the Company’s established and extensive patent estate.

In addition, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted
US Patent No. 9,376,673, and issued a Notice of Allowance for another application (US 15/160,669), with composition of matter claims for various beta-lactamase candidates related to ribaxamase. These new patent assets further strengthen the Company’s coverage of its novel proprietary candidate, ribaxamase, which is also covered by a previously granted composition of matter patent in the U.S.

“The successful granting of this composition of matter patent in Europe, alongside our continued patent successes in the U.S., further strengthens Synthetic Biologics’ role as a leader in the development of microbiome-focused programs intended to address largely unmet medical needs,” said Jeffrey Riley, President and Chief Executive Officer. “As we continue to enjoy momentum in the clinic, our progress is further complimented by our well established and reinforced patent estate for ribaxamase.”

Ribaxamase is designed to degrade certain intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotics excreted into the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to maintain the natural balance of the
gut microbiome.

C. difficile is associated with approximately 453,000 CDIs and > 29,000 C. difficile-related deaths in the United States each year[i].

Upon issuance, these newly allowed applications reinforce Synthetic Biologics’ extensive C. difficile-related patent estate, which includes approximately 40 U.S. and foreign patents and approximately 30 U.S. and foreign patent pending applications, and patents and patent applications with terms that extend from at least 2031 to 2036.

 

To read this article in its entirety click on the link below:

http://ir.syntheticbiologics.com/press-releases/detail/216

A Study Provides Data That Between 2010 and 2011 Throughout U.S. At Least 30 Percent of Antibiotics Unnecessarily Prescribed

Antibiotics Unnecessarily Prescribed!

At least 30 percent of antibiotics are unnecessarily prescribed, contributing to the rise of debilitating and sometimes deadly bacteria-resistant superbugs, according to a study released Tuesday – May 3, 2016.

To reach this conclusion, researchers tracked antibiotic use in doctors’ offices and emergency departments between 2010 and 2011 throughout the United States. The study results were published in Journal of the American Medical Association by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention along with Pew Charitable Trusts.

The findings showed that doctors needlessly wrote prescriptions for viruses, such as the common cold, viral sore throats and other ailments that can’t be cured with antibiotics. More than 47 million excess prescriptions put patients in harm’s way for allergic reactions and superbugs, such as Clostridium difficile, or C. diff.

“The rampant misuse of antibiotics is probably the leading infectious disease public health threat the world faces,” Dr. Amesh Adalja, a UPMC infectious disease specialist, said after learning of the study results. “The spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the infections they cause are a crisis and, if allowed to continue, will drag civilization back decades.”

Superbugs kill 23,000 Americans a year and sicken 2 million, according to the CDC.

Last year, the White House set its sights on superbugs, releasing a plan to combat the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The plan’s goal is to reduce outpatient antibiotic use by 50 percent and inpatient use by 20 percent by 2020.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://triblive.com/news/adminpage/10409989-74/antibiotics-antibiotic-doctors