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C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

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The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website https://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html

Facilities Work Together To Protect Patients and Reduce Spreading Infection

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What can be done?

In the case of C diff and CRE a multipronged intervention approach is necessary. The federal government needs to track outbreaks and monitor antibiotic use. The state and local health departments need to coordinate infection control activities. Hospitals and nursing homes need to implement infection control plans and collaborate in sharing data. Doctors need to avoid excessive antibiotic use and practice hand hygiene.

As for the patients, they need to demand action: ask their health care providers what they and the facility are doing to protect the patient from C difficile and CRE infection. Also, patients need to wash their hands and insist that all health care worker wash their hands before touching them.

 

To read the article in its entirety click on link below:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/manoj-jain-md-mph/coordinated-care-can-redu_b_8031016.html

 

 

“Superbugs” Multibillion-Dollar Global Support to Fund Antibiotic Research Is Needed

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A multibillion-dollar investment into the global pharmaceuticals industry is needed to ward off the threat of drug-resistant “superbugs,” according to Jim O’Neill, the economist leading a review into antimicrobial resistance for the U.K. government.

 

Mr. O’Neill, best known for coining the “BRIC” acronym for Brazil, Russia, India and China while at Goldman Sachs, estimated that as much as $37 billion is needed over the next 10 years to spur the industry to develop innovative antibiotics, since there is little market incentive to do so.

Mr. O’Neill added that this sum was “modest” in comparison with the economic cost of ignoring the problem. In an earlier report, he estimated that antimicrobial resistance, or AMR, would kill 300 million people prematurely in the next 35 years if unaddressed, leaving global gross domestic product 2% to 3.5% short of what it otherwise would have been by 2050. That would mean $60 trillion to $100 trillion in lost economic output over that 35-year span.

Pharmaceutical companies largely retreated from antibiotic research during the 1990s, due to a high degree of uncertainty on the eventual market size for any novel drugs. A plentiful supply of older and cheaper antibiotics means that a novel product will be used only after other treatments have failed.
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Now, the pipeline of new antibiotics has dried up, so there are few new drugs to combat bacteria that have developed resistance to existing treatments. U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron, who commissioned the review in July, has said increasing drug-resistance could cast the world back into the “dark ages of medicine where treatable infections and injuries will kill once again.”

Mr. O’Neill said extra investment was needed at every stage of the antibiotic development process to “radically overhaul” the antibiotics pipeline over the next 20 years.

He proposed giving companies that already have the “highest priority antibiotics” in their pipelines a “lump-sum” payment. This would “delink” profitability from sales volumes, lowering the risk of developing a novel antibiotic as well as reducing the incentive to oversell the drug once it is on the market.

In the USA –

March 2015:  Two million illnesses. 23,000 deaths. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, that’s the human toll from antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” each year in the United States. To fight the growing problem of infections that can’t be treated, the administration of President Barack Obama is implementing a five-year national action plan at a cost of $1.2 billion. Those funds, part of the President’s 2015 budget, which must still be approved by Congress, would nearly double the amount of federal money allocated to the fight. The plan calls for creating a “one-health” approach to testing and reporting superbugs around the country, as well as establishing a DNA database of resistant bacteria.  New, rapid tests to detect emerging resistant bacteria will be developed.  Research for new antibiotics and vaccines will accelerate. The plan calls for two new options for people, and three for animals, by 2020.

The National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Global surveillance and cooperation is also stressed, including a global database for animals.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/03/27/health/obama-antibiotic-resistance/index.html

“Anti-microbial resistance has the potential to harm or kill anyone in the country, undermine modern medicine, to devastate our economy and to make our health care system less stable,” Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, CDC Director said.   Antibiotic resistance costs $20 billion in health care spending a year, Frieden said. To combat the spread of resistant bacteria, Frieden said the CDC plans to isolate their existence in hospitals and shrink the numbers through tracking and stricter prevention methods.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/07/22/antibiotic-resistance-bacteria-drugs-cdc-lab-safety-mers-anthrax/13005415/

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD, CDC Medical Epidemiologist states,  “Today’s antibiotics are miracle drugs, but they are endangered,”  “These new materials provide core elements and practical tools for beginning and advancing antibiotic stewardship programs.”

In July 2014 the United Sates Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  rolled out a new way every hospital in the country can track and control drug resistant bacteria. CDC already operates the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), with more than 12,000 health care facilities participating. Now we are implementing a breakthrough program that will take control of drug resistance to the next level – the Antibiotic Use and Resistance (AUR) reporting module. The module is fully automated, capturing antibiotic prescriptions and drug susceptibility test results electronically. With this module, we’ll be able to create the first antibiotic prescribing index. This index will help benchmark antibiotic use across health care facilities for the first time, allowing facilities to compare their data with similar facilities. It will help facilities and local and state health departments as well as CDC to  identify hot spots within a city or a region.  We’ll be able to answer the questions: Which facilities are prescribing more antibiotics? How many types of resistant bacteria and fungi are they seeing? Do prescribing practices predict the number of resistant infections and outbreaks a facility will face?  Ultimately with this information, we’ll be able to both improve prescribing practices and identify and stop outbreaks in a way we have never done before.  This will help deploy supportive and evidence-based interventions at each facility as well as at regional levels to help stop spread among various facilities.  The need for a comprehensive system to collect local, regional, and national data on antibiotic resistance is more critical than ever. The system now exists, and we need quick and widespread uptake.Rapid and full implementation of this system is supported through the proposed increase of $14 million contained in CDC’s 2015 budget request to Congress.

UK:  Mr. O’Neill highlighted antibiotics that were active against bacteria where the existing drugs are already the “last line” of defense as those that could receive priority funding. He also called for a “global AMR innovation fund” of around $2 billion over five years to kick-start basic research into new antibiotics.

While Mr. O’Neill didn’t specifically call on pharmaceutical companies to foot the bill for the innovation fund, he did urge the industry to act with “enlightened self-interest” in tackling AMR, “recognizing that it has a long-term commercial imperative to having effective antibiotics, as well as a moral one.”

He said these measures, along with efforts to link up early research with companies, could bring 15 new drugs a decade to market, at least four of which would be “truly novel.”

The proposals received broad support from the industry. Severin Schwan, chief executive of Roche Holding AG , said the company was “committed to working with the AMR Review Committee and being part of this solution.” Patrick Vallance, president of pharmaceuticals research and development at GlaxoSmithKline PLC, also said he welcomed the findings of the review.

In an earlier report, Mr. O’Neill had already called for more action to make better use of existing antibiotics, such as curbing excessive use or researching whether combining old drugs could prove more effective against superbugs.

The economist is scheduled to submit his final recommendations in the summer of 2016.

Two leading CDC Physicians discuss current issues focused on C. difficile infections (CDI) and Antibiotic usage, Tuesday, May 5th on C. diff. Spores and More, C diff Radio

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C. diff. Spores and More”

UPCOMING SHOW:  Tuesday, May 5th: 

Two leading CDC Physicians discuss current issues focused on C. diff.Infections and Antibiotic usage.

 

Join us as we learn from our guests;

Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC with main interests in epidemiology and prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and the prevention of antimicrobial resistance,

AND
Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD, Associate Director for Healthcare-Associated Infection prevention programs in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease. Listen in as these two stellar Physicians discuss the topics of Clostridium difficile infections and Antibiotic usage, two important issues with potential solutions facing the citizens on a global level.

Guest Bio’s:

Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University.  Past positions have included Associate Investigator at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan and Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville. Dr. McDonald is a former Epidemic Intelligence Service officer and former Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he currently serves as the Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity.  He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology and prevention of healthcare-associated infections, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and the prevention of antimicrobial resistance.

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD, is Associate Director for healthcare-associated infection prevention programs in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Dr. Srinivasan is also a captain in the US Public Health Service. An infectious disease doctor, Dr. Srinivasan oversees several CDC programs aimed at eliminating healthcare-associated infections and improving antibiotic use. For much of his CDC career, Dr. Srinivasan ran the healthcare outbreak investigation unit, helping hospitals and other healthcare facilities track down bacteria and stop them from infecting other patients. Today, Dr. Srinivasan leads CDC’s work to improve antibiotic prescribing and works with a team of CDC experts researching new strategies to eliminate healthcare-associated infections.

 

http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Antibiotic-resistance TWITTER Q & A with CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frienden and CMS CMO, Patrick Conway

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At least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and 23,000 die as a result of these infections each year. Antibiotic resistance just might be the most urgent health threat facing us today.

Join CDC Director                                                Dr. Tom Frieden        and CMS Chief Medical Officer Patrick Conway       on TWITTER  for answers to your questions about antibiotic resistance and its impact on modern medicine and what you can do to be a safe patient this Wednesday, June 18, at 2PM EDT    #SafeCareChat

 

Pediatric C. diff. infections linked with antibiotic use

According to the latest report published by the Center of Disease Control and Prevention, it  urges Physicians to improve on prescribing antibiotics, in an outpatient setting, to reduce harm in the pediatric population.

In a new study it showed that 71 percent of the cases of C. difficile infection identified among children aged 1 through 17 years were community-associated—that is, not associated with an overnight stay in a healthcare facility.  By contrast, two-thirds of C. difficile infections in adults are associated with hospital stays.

“Among the community-associated pediatric cases whose parents were interviewed, 73 percent were prescribed antibiotics during the 12 weeks prior to their illness, usually in an outpatient setting such as a doctor’s office.  Most of the children who received antibiotics were being treated for ear, sinus, or upper respiratory infections. Previous studies show that at least 50 percent of antibiotics prescribed in doctor’s offices for children are for respiratory infections, most of which do not require antibiotics.”

A statement from the CDC Director; Dr. Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.,  “Improved antibiotic prescribing is critical to protect the health of our nation’s children,”  “When antibiotics are prescribed incorrectly, our children are needlessly put at risk for health problems including C. difficile infection and dangerous antibiotic resistant infections.”

To read the report in its’ entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0307-severe-diarrheal-illness.html

Also the published January 2014 study in Pediatrics – Journal of the Academy of Pediatrics

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2014/02/25/peds.2013-3049

Antibiotic checklist to improve Antibiotic Prescribing

Through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and their new Vital Signs report, the main focus remains on the use of antibiotics and raising awareness of antibiotic therapy.

A statement from CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, “Improving antibiotic prescribing can save today’s patients from deadly infections and protect lifesaving antibiotics for tomorrow’s patients.”   “Healthcare facilities are an important part of the solution to drug resistance and every hospital in the country should have a strong antibiotic stewardship program.”

Through the National Healthcare Safety Network, healthcare – associated infection (HAI) tracking system the CDC provides facilities, states, regions, and the nation data needed to identify problem areas, the measurable progress of prevention efforts being made with constant interventions and goal to eliminate HAI’s across the board.

The CDC recommends every hospital implement a Stewardship program that includes the following seven key elements:

Accountability: Appoint a single leader responsible for program outcome. Physicians have proven successful in this role.

Act: Take at least one prescribing improvement action, such as requiring reassessment of prescriptions within 48 hours to check drug choice, dose, and duration.

Drug Expertise: Appoint a single Pharmacist leader to support improved prescribing.

Educate: Offer education about antibiotic resistance and improve prescribing practices.

Leadership Commitment: Dedicate the necessary human, financial, and IT resources.

Report: Regularly report prescribing and resistance information to clinicians.

Track: Monitor prescribing and antibiotic resistance patterns.

The CDC stresses the importance of communicating and working with other health care facilities in the area to prevent infection transmission, and resistance from occurring.

To read the Vital Signs report in its’ entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/improving-antibiotic-prescribing-in-hospitals-can-make-health-care-safer-248400031.html

 

The CDC Antibiotic Stewardship Program:  Save money with antibiotic stewardship

 

Antibiotic stewardship programs and interventions help ensure that patients get the right antibiotics at the right time for the right duration. Numerous studies have shown that implementing an antibiotic stewardship program can not only save lives, but can save significant healthcare dollars.   Inpatient antibiotic stewardship programs have consistently demonstrated annual savings to hospitals and other healthcare facilities of $200,000 to $400,000.

A University of Maryland study showed one antibiotic stewardship program saved a total of $17 million over 8 years.   Antibiotic stewardship helps improve patient care and shorten hospital stays, thus benefiting patients as well as hospitals.

According to a University of Maryland study, implementation of one antibiotic stewardship program saved a total of $17 million over 8 years at one institution.  * After the program was discontinued, antibiotic costs increased over $1 million in the first year (an increase of 23 percent) and continued to increase the following year.

  • In a study conducted at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, it was demonstrated that guidelines for management of community-acquired pneumonia could promote the use of shorter courses of therapy, saving money and promoting patient safety.
  • Targeting certain infections may decrease antibiotic use. For example, determining when and how to treat patients for urinary tract infections, the second most common bacterial infection leading to hospitalization, can lead to improved patient outcomes and cost savings.
  • Why we must act now: The way we use antibiotics today or in one patient directly impacts how effective they will be tomorrow or in another patient; they are a shared resource.  Antibiotic resistance is not just a problem for the person with the infection. Some resistant bacteria have the potential to spread to others — promoting antibiotic-resistant infections. Since it will be many years before new antibiotics are available to treat some resistant infections, we need to improve the use of antibiotics that are currently available.
  • Healthcare facility administrators and payers can – Make appropriate antibiotic use a quality improvement and patient safety priority.  Focus on reducing unnecessary antibiotic use, which can reduce antibiotic-resistant infections, Clostridium difficile infections, and costs, while improving patient outcomes.   Emphasize and implement antibiotic stewardship programs and interventions for every facility – regardless of facility setting and size.  Monitor Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS®) performance measures on pharyngitis, upper respiratory infections, acute bronchitis, and antibiotic utilization.

For more information regarding the CDC Antibiotic Stewardship information please click on the following link:

http://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/healthcare/learn-from-others/factsheets/antibiotic-use.html

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