Tag Archives: Get Smart

C. diff. and Healthcare-Associated Infections Discussed Live on C. diff. Radio

CdiffRadioPost

#CdiffRadio

C Diff Foundation, Sponsor, with Founder            Nancy C. Caralla, Executive Director and               Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, Chairperson of the Research and Development Community will be broadcasting live on Tuesdays delivering the most up-to-date information pertaining to a leading super-bug/ Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI),  C. difficile, with additional HAI’s, and a variety of related healthcare topics.

Topic experts will be joining your hosts to discuss prevention, treatments, clinical trials, and environmental safety products on a global level.

Tune in Tuesdays beginning March 3rd at 11 AM Pacific Time (2 PM Eastern Time, 7 PM UK) on the VoiceAmerica network  http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

North Carolina Get Smart Partner – Antimicrobial Stewardship Campaign

North Carolina Get Smart 

Antimicrobial Stewardship Campaign

Antibiotics Awareness Week November 17 – 23, 2014

The goal of the NC Get Smart Campaign is to reach all 100 North Carolina counties’ public and provider audiences with the CDC Get Smart Antimicrobial awareness message. Antimicrobial drugs are lifesavers and a vital resource to be preserved. The overuse of antibiotics has led to increased resistance of known infections.  The NC Get Smart Campaign for NC begins on November 17, 2014 and completes on June 30, 2015.

Get Smart About Antibiotics Week logo web button

This webpage contains resources that you can utilize  to promote awareness of antimicrobial drug overuse.

 

 

GETSMARTScreen-Shot-2014-10-22-at-4.47.09-PM

 

NC Get Smart Partners

cdifflogoadjdtrd

 

 

CoverSlide

C Diff Foundation Promoting C. difficile Prevention and Awareness to Witness a Decrease in C. difficile Infections Worldwide

November is C. difficile Infection Awareness Month!   Join us in the fight by participating in a variety of events that let you support the cause while doing the things you love to do. Here’s a listing of many ways the C Diff Foundation is spreading awareness with ways to prevent acquiring this infection while raising funds.

Take the Antibiotic “Resistance Fighter” Pledge

How to be a resistance fighter?   Limit the use of Antibiotics! Understand that antibiotics are only effective against bacteria and not viruses: colds, flu and most coughs are caused by viruses and will get better on their own.  Treat your flu and cold symptoms and let your immune system fight the virus.  Antibiotics will not help you get better quickly, and may give you side effects such as diarrhea and thrush. They can also lead to acquired C. diff. infections. They won’t stop your virus spreading to other people only YOU can do that with good hand hygiene.  Don’t ask for antibiotics , instead ask your doctor about the best way to treat your symptoms.   If you are prescribed antibiotics ask your doctor about the risks and benefits and always take them exactly as prescribed. Never take someone else’s antibiotics, always speak with your Primary Care Physician (PCP) or healthcare professional when symptoms linger or worsen.

Let us all take the “Resistance Fighter” Pledge and feel free to share the pledge with             everyone you know:
I will not expect antibiotics for colds and flu as they have no effect on viruses.
I will take antibiotics as directed IF I am prescribed them, and not ask for them.
I will practice good hygiene, making hand washing #1, and help stop giving germs a free ride.

Now we can ALL spread knowledge, not infections and encourage others to join the fight against antibiotic resistance.

“Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work” CDC Campaign :

Get Smart About Antibiotics Week has been an annual effort to coordinate the work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. The campaign organized its first annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week in 2008. CDC’s Get Smart campaign, housed in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, collaborated with state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns and non-profit and for-profit partners. The success of the pilot year was measured by 1) dissemination of educational materials and messages, 2) partner satisfaction, and 3) media interest. A robust evaluation of the pilot week determined that each of these goals was met and exceeded. This was followed by other successful Get Smart About Antibiotics Week observances.

During November 17-23, 2014, the annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week will be observed. As in past years, the effort will coordinate work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. As with the past observances, messages and resources for improving antibiotic use in  healthcare settings from CDC’s Get Smart for Healthcare campaign will be included. Get Smart for Healthcare is a program housed in CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.

  • Ask your physician questions such as, “Do I really need an antibiotic?”
  • Bacteria only, not viruses (common cold, flu), can be killed by antibiotics.
  • Complete the entire course of prescribed antibiotics, even if you feel better midway through.

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacterial changes reduce or eliminate an antibiotic’s ability to kill the bacteria.

The Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC)  recommends the following:

  • Take antibiotics only and exactly as instructed by your healthcare provider.
  • Only take antibiotics prescribed for you.
  • Do not save or share antibiotics prescribed to you.
  • Do not pressure your healthcare provider to prescribe you antibiotics.

 

SHOPPING:

Shop Amazon to Give to the C Diff Foundation

It’s a pleasure to share the new way to give to the C Diff Foundation.  Amazon will share a portion of the proceeds from your purchases with the  C Diff Foundation.  While you are shopping on-line you are also donating, and we are grateful.  Here is how it works:

* Shop Amazon through AmazonSmile and select C Diff Foundation as your charity.

Click on the link below to access their site.

https://smile.amazon.com/

Sign into your Amazon Account with ID and Password.  Scroll down past the default chosen Charity and at the following option

Or pick your own charitable organization:________  

Type in  C Diff Foundation and press Enter

C Diff Foundation Inc (About)
Specifically Named Diseases             New Prt Rchy, FL
Click the SELECT button

It is as easy as that!

Education:

2nd Annual “Raising C. difficile infection and Hospital-Associated Infections (HAI’s) Awareness” Conference on November 4th, 2014 at 8:00 am. The event will be hosted at the                               University of Illinois at Chicago  Student Center West,
828 S. Wolcott Avenue,  M. M. Thompson Room – C, Chicago, IL 60612

Twitter chats and daily tweets in honor of Raising C. difficile infection Awareness Week                   From  November 1st through November 7th.

worldaroundCDF Volunteers continue sharing information  within their communities, and organizing Fundraisers during the month of November to raise C. difficile infection awareness, prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.  Each Volunteer is a special leaf, on each branch of this growing  Foundation tree.  Our sincere gratitude to every one of our Volunteers!!

Follow the C Diff Foundation   on Facebook,                                                                                          Twitter @CDiffFoundation, Pinetrest, and LinkedIn and join the fight.

Thank you for your support that helps our mission continue moving forward.                         Educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.

Be sure to check our C Diff Foundation page often as new events are added weekly.

C Diff Foundation Kicks Off Raising C. diff. Awareness Week beginning November 1st

cdiffNovemberribbon

Beginning November 1st, join the C Diff Foundation in “Raising C. diff.  Awareness Week.”

Let’s begin promoting C. difficile prevention and begin witnessing a decrease in newly diagnosed C. difficile infections worldwide.

HAND-WASHING remains the number one prevention.  Follow the hand washing procedures to ensure proper and effective technique:

 

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

When is it a good time to wash hands?

Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food,Before and after patient care, Before and after treating a cut or wound, Before  exiting a restroom,  After a diaper change, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After petting a pet or any livestock animals, After touching garbage, AND OFTEN.

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommends infection control protocols be shared between healthcare professionals and long-term facility administrators for the safety of the patient, visitors, and other patient’s safety.

Question the necessity of antibiotics to treat symptoms.  Unnecessary use of antibiotics raises the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Remember antibiotics do not effect viruses.  Healthcare professionals; confirming a bacterial infection before prescribing antibiotic course of treatment is advised.

Testing:  When a patient presents symptoms (diarrhea with abdominal cramping/pain, fatigue, fever) ordering a C. difficile stool test to rule out a C. diff. infection is beneficial, especially if the patient has been treated with antibiotics within ninety-days.

Environmental Safety:  Disinfecting a patient’s room, treated for a positive C. difficile infection, with a bleach or Federal EPA registered spore-killing product will help eliminate C. difficile spores from being spread to another patient’s room.  Environmental safety is also an important matter in home-care.  Cleaning all high-touch areas in both long-term and acute care facilities, and home environments will help decrease the spread of this infection.  (High-touch surfaces: light switches, door knobs/handles, bed-side commodes, bathroom hand rails, commode, sink and sink handles, counter-tops, floors, bath-tubs, showers, canes, wheel-chairs, and all medical equipment in a patient’s room).

Person Protection: Visitors and Environmental professionals, wear proper personal protection equipment when treating and cleaning areas/rooms of a C. difficile patient.  (gloves, gowns, shoe coverings, protective eye wear if using using spray solutions).

Patient Isolation:  Protect the patient and others by keeping a C. difficile patient in isolation in long-term and acute care facilities.  This will prevent the spread of infection to others and other areas within the facilities.

Communication:  If a patient is being transferred from either a long-term or acute care facility, communicate to the facility intake personnel the patient’s C. diff. infection and necessary infection control protocols to be implemented for the patient and other patient’s safety.

The CDC has been sharing public announcements regarding the use of Antibiotics for both healthcare professionals and patients alike.  Colds, Ear and Sinus symptoms may be caused by a virus, not bacteria.  Taking antibiotics to treat a virus makes antibiotic medications less effective when they are needed while raising the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Limit the use of Antibiotics to reduce the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection  (Bacterial infections and the treatment of symptoms will be determined and should be followed by the treating healthcare professionals). * November 17-23rd, 2014 join the CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign.

None of us can do this alone…..all of us can do this TOGETHER!

For additional C. difficile information, review the archives and categories available on the website :   http://www.cdifffoundation.org

 

 

 

Sources: CDC, C Diff Foundation Chairperson Infection Control

Antibiotic checklist to improve Antibiotic Prescribing

Through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and their new Vital Signs report, the main focus remains on the use of antibiotics and raising awareness of antibiotic therapy.

A statement from CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, “Improving antibiotic prescribing can save today’s patients from deadly infections and protect lifesaving antibiotics for tomorrow’s patients.”   “Healthcare facilities are an important part of the solution to drug resistance and every hospital in the country should have a strong antibiotic stewardship program.”

Through the National Healthcare Safety Network, healthcare – associated infection (HAI) tracking system the CDC provides facilities, states, regions, and the nation data needed to identify problem areas, the measurable progress of prevention efforts being made with constant interventions and goal to eliminate HAI’s across the board.

The CDC recommends every hospital implement a Stewardship program that includes the following seven key elements:

Accountability: Appoint a single leader responsible for program outcome. Physicians have proven successful in this role.

Act: Take at least one prescribing improvement action, such as requiring reassessment of prescriptions within 48 hours to check drug choice, dose, and duration.

Drug Expertise: Appoint a single Pharmacist leader to support improved prescribing.

Educate: Offer education about antibiotic resistance and improve prescribing practices.

Leadership Commitment: Dedicate the necessary human, financial, and IT resources.

Report: Regularly report prescribing and resistance information to clinicians.

Track: Monitor prescribing and antibiotic resistance patterns.

The CDC stresses the importance of communicating and working with other health care facilities in the area to prevent infection transmission, and resistance from occurring.

To read the Vital Signs report in its’ entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/improving-antibiotic-prescribing-in-hospitals-can-make-health-care-safer-248400031.html

 

The CDC Antibiotic Stewardship Program:  Save money with antibiotic stewardship

 

Antibiotic stewardship programs and interventions help ensure that patients get the right antibiotics at the right time for the right duration. Numerous studies have shown that implementing an antibiotic stewardship program can not only save lives, but can save significant healthcare dollars.   Inpatient antibiotic stewardship programs have consistently demonstrated annual savings to hospitals and other healthcare facilities of $200,000 to $400,000.

A University of Maryland study showed one antibiotic stewardship program saved a total of $17 million over 8 years.   Antibiotic stewardship helps improve patient care and shorten hospital stays, thus benefiting patients as well as hospitals.

According to a University of Maryland study, implementation of one antibiotic stewardship program saved a total of $17 million over 8 years at one institution.  * After the program was discontinued, antibiotic costs increased over $1 million in the first year (an increase of 23 percent) and continued to increase the following year.

  • In a study conducted at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, it was demonstrated that guidelines for management of community-acquired pneumonia could promote the use of shorter courses of therapy, saving money and promoting patient safety.
  • Targeting certain infections may decrease antibiotic use. For example, determining when and how to treat patients for urinary tract infections, the second most common bacterial infection leading to hospitalization, can lead to improved patient outcomes and cost savings.
  • Why we must act now: The way we use antibiotics today or in one patient directly impacts how effective they will be tomorrow or in another patient; they are a shared resource.  Antibiotic resistance is not just a problem for the person with the infection. Some resistant bacteria have the potential to spread to others — promoting antibiotic-resistant infections. Since it will be many years before new antibiotics are available to treat some resistant infections, we need to improve the use of antibiotics that are currently available.
  • Healthcare facility administrators and payers can – Make appropriate antibiotic use a quality improvement and patient safety priority.  Focus on reducing unnecessary antibiotic use, which can reduce antibiotic-resistant infections, Clostridium difficile infections, and costs, while improving patient outcomes.   Emphasize and implement antibiotic stewardship programs and interventions for every facility – regardless of facility setting and size.  Monitor Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS®) performance measures on pharyngitis, upper respiratory infections, acute bronchitis, and antibiotic utilization.

For more information regarding the CDC Antibiotic Stewardship information please click on the following link:

http://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/healthcare/learn-from-others/factsheets/antibiotic-use.html

cdc logo

Antibiotic Resistance – Know The Facts

Facts About Antibiotic Resistance

    • Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the world’s most pressing public health problems.
    • The number of bacteria resistant to antibiotics has increased in the last decade. Many bacterial infections are becoming resistant to the most commonly prescribed antibiotic treatments.
    • Every time a person takes antibiotics, sensitive bacteria are killed, but resistant germs may be left to grow and multiply. Repeated and improper uses of antibiotics are primary causes of the increase in drug-resistant bacteria.

Know the Facts?

  • Misuse of antibiotics jeopardizes the usefulness of essential drugs. Decreasing inappropriate antibiotic use is the best way to control resistance.
  • Children are of particular concern because they have the highest rates of antibiotic use.
  • Antibiotic resistance can cause significant danger and suffering for people who have common infections that once were easily treatable with antibiotics. When antibiotics fail to work, the consequences are longer-lasting illnesses, more doctor visits or extended hospital stays, and the need for more expensive and toxic medications. Some resistant infections can even cause death.

Antibiotic Prescribing: Attitudes, Behaviors, Trends & Cost

  • Parent pressure makes a difference. For pediatric care, a study showed that doctors prescribe antibiotics 62% of the time if they perceive parents expect them and 7% of the time if they feel parents do not expect them.[1]
  • Antibiotics were prescribed in 68% of acute respiratory tract visits – and of those, 80% were unnecessary according to CDC guidelines.[2]
  • National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data shows that overall antibiotic prescribing dropped from 13.8 prescriptions per 100 office visits to 12.0 prescriptions per 100 office visits comparing 1997-98 to 2005-06 with a 13% reduction in overall antimicrobial prescribing.[3]
  • According to NAMCS, the Get Smart Campaign contributed to a reduction in antimicrobials prescribed for children <5 years in ambulatory care otitis media (ear infection) visits. In 2007 47.5 antimicrobials were prescribed per 100 visits, down from 61 in 2006 and 69 in 1997.[4]
  • Among children younger than 5 years, annual ARTI (acute respiratory tract infections) visit rates decreased by 17% from 1883 per 1000 population in 1995-96 to 1560 per 1000 population in 2005-06, primarily due to a 33% decrease in visit rates for otitis media.
  • $1.1 billion is spent annually on unnecessary adult upper respiratory infection antibiotic prescriptions.[5]
  • Get Smart has contributed to 25% reduction in antimicrobial use per outpatient office visit for presumed viral infections (NAMCS); intervention studies show a reduction of 8 to 26% for antibiotic prescriptions.[6]

 

References

  1. Mangione-Smith R, McGlynn EA, Elliott MN, et al: The relationship between perceived parental expectations and pediatrician antimicrobial prescribing behavior. Pediatrics103:711-718, 1999.
  2. Scott JG, Cohen D, DiCicco-Bloom B, Orzano AJ, et al: Antibiotic use in acute respiratory infections and the ways patients pressure physicians for a prescription. J Fam Pract: 50(10): 853-8, 2001.
  3. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS).
  4. Grijalva CG, Nuorti JP, Griffin M: Antibiotic prescription rates for acute respiratory tract infections in US ambulatory settings. JAMA 302: 758-766, 2009.
  5. Fendrick AM, Monto AS, Nightengale B, Sarnes M: The economic burden of non-influenza related viral respiratory tract infection in the United States. Arch Int Med: 163(4): 487-94, 2003.
  6. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS).

(Furnished by the CDC)

Image