Category Archives: C. diff. Survivors Alliance Network

A dedicated site for C. diff. survivors to share their stories, gather information, gain strength, and network. A survivor is one that has been touched by a C. difficile infection, one who is recovering from this infection, one who has recovered yet lives with the long-lasting symptoms, and those who have experienced the loss of another person from C. difficile or C. diff. involvement. www.cdiffsurvivors.org

Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond, Author, Health Coach, C.diff. And Breast Cancer Survivor Raises CDI Awareness

veronica-edmond

 

Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond, Author, Health Coach,
C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate, C. diff. and
Stage 3 Breast Cancer Survivor joined us on
September 20th, 2016, at the
4th Annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta, Georgia.

Veronica bravely shared her tormenting, painful experience encountered with a C. difficile infection while simultaneously undergoing  treatment for Breast Cancer.

We are grateful for her full recovery from this life-threatening diagnosis and infection and for the positive attitude Veronica has in promoting breast health, wellness, and raising C.diff. awareness.

Thank you Veronica and to all fellow C.diff.  Survivors  www.cdiffsurvivors.org  sharing their inspirational journey

“No one can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

C.diff. Survivor

C.diff. Survivor

 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving is a great time to reflect on the year’s blessings, reconnect with family, share a big meal and sometimes get indigestion. Often times, the overindulgence of a variety of foods may cause an upset stomach or stomach bug.

To be blunt, the rapid expansion of the stomach and foods rich in creams, sugar, and fat can cause gas, bloating and diarrhea. In most cases, the stomach discomfort is temporary and, with over-the-counter medicine, the symptoms are gone.

When should you be concerned, if the usual remedies are ineffective to control diarrhea?

One of the answers is when the pain from diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever is so severe that it lands you in the emergency room. In Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond’s case, she was already hospitalized during her second round of chemotherapy for an aggressive form of stage 3 breast cancer.

Please click on the link below to be redirected to this most admirable story shared by Veronica with Marie Y. Lemelle, Contributing Columnist at Wave Newspapers

http://wavenewspapers.com/health-matters-a-case-of-diarrhea-that-almost-turned-deadly/

 

MarieLemelle2016

Marie Y. Lemelle, MBA, a public relations consultant, is the owner of Platinum Star PR and can be reached on Twitter @PlatinumStar, or Instagram @PlatinumStarPR. Send “Health Matters” related questions to healthmatters@wavepublication.com and look for her column in The Wave.

“What is C. diff.?” One Woman Walked Up To Us And Asked – Then the Crowd Followed

Heather and Kimberly III 7.23.16

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates; Heather Clark and
her sister, Kimberly Reilly participated at local events over the summer season  to educate and advocate
for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety within the local communities raising C. diff. awareness and saving lives.

 

On behalf of the C Diff Foundation , we sincerely thank you Heather and Kimberly for your dedication, your time, and for joining the
C Diff Foundation partnering and sharing our global mission.

We are truly grateful to the many special Volunteer Patient Advocates, the special individuals donating their time in “Raising C. diff. Awareness within their communities” around the globe.  Thank You!

Heather and Kimberly lost their dear Father from C.diff. involvement.  Shortly after his passing,  Heather and Kimberly took a stand with the C Diff Foundation and dedicated their time and efforts in  “Raising C. diff. Awareness” to help educate, and advocate for this life-threatening infection that played a big part in their Father’s passing.

To listen to Heather’s journey, with fellow C. diff. survivors,  – please click on the podcast link below:

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/85287/c-diff-survivors-share-their-unique-journey-through-a-c-diff-infection-and-how-it-changed-their

“What is C. diff.?”

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) is gram-positive, anaerobic, and a spore, rod/spindle-shape,
a common bacterium of the human intestine in 2 – 5%. C diff. becomes a serious gastrointestinal infection when individuals have been exposed to antibiotic therapy, and/or have experienced a long-term hospitalization, and/or have had an extended stay in a long-term care facility. However; the risk of acquiring a C diff. infection (CDI) has increased as it is in the community (Community Acquired CDI) and found in outpatient settings.

There are significant risk factors in patients who are immunosuppressant, ones who have been on antibiotic therapy, and the elderly population.

How do Antibiotics cause C diff.? The antibiotics cause a disruption in the normal intestinal flora which leads to an over growth of C difficile bacteria in the colon. The leading antibiotics known to disrupt the normal intestinal flora, yet not limited to, are Ampicillin, Amoxicillin, Cephalosporins, Clindamycin, and the broad spectrum antibiotics.

Since  November 2012 the CDC has shared public announcements regarding antibiotic use: Colds and many ear and sinus infections are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Taking antibiotics to treat a “virus” can make those drugs less effective when you and your family really need them. Limiting the usage of antibiotics will also help limit new cases of CDI.
*Always discuss the symptoms and medications with the treating Physician.

What are C.diff. Symptoms? Symptoms of Clostridium difficile (C.diff.)
C.diff. strains produce several toxins; the most popular are enterotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin A and cytotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin B.  Both strains are responsible for the symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and can advance to a complication of a severe inflammation of the colon; pseudomembranous colitis, which can also lead to further complications of toxic megacolon.

How is C.diff. Transmitted? Mode of transmission of CDI can be either directly or indirectly, hospital acquired (nosocomial) or community – acquired; Ingesting C.diff spores transmitted from others and patients by hands, or altered normal intestinal flora by antibiotic therapy allowing proliferation of C.diff.  in the colon.  Coming in contact with surfaces, devices, or material with Clostridium difficile spores can easily be transferred to individuals by hands that have touched a contaminated surface or item. Examples of surfaces, devices, and materials contaminated with C.diff. spores in hospital and community/outpatient settings: commodes, bath tubs, showers, hand rails, bed rails, counter tops, handles, clothing, medical equipment, and electronic rectal thermometers.

The C Diff Foundation provide a wide range of programs, such as education, and advocacy for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide, training of volunteer patient advocates (VPA’s) across the globe to provide educational workshops, supplying life-saving medications for those afflicted with this infection from young children to seniors, building satellite branches across the globe, presenting educational workshops in educational programs, improving and expanding the C. difficile infection awareness, providing global tele-conferencing support sessions in mental health counseling, long-term illnesses, the prevention, treatments, environmental safety with nutritional education for patients, and families suffering through a C. difficile infection
and so much more.

We are working together and dedicated at raising C. diff. awareness to witness a decrease in newly diagnosed C. difficile infections worldwide and through dedication and efforts of the
C Diff Foundation Volunteers – we will meet our goals.

Lycoming Fair 7.16.16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treatments For CDI?   Treating C diff is becoming more challenging to physicians, frustrating to patients, and costly to the health care industry. To date there are three antibiotics effective at treating C diff: Metronidazole is prescribed to treat mild to moderate symptoms and is cost effective (8). Vancomycin is prescribed for moderate to severe symptoms via: oral route as intravenous administration does not achieve gut lumen therapeutic levels. Vancomycin is prescribed to patients with unsuccessful results from the Metronidazole, or the patient is allergic, or pregnant, breastfeeding, or younger than ten years of age.

The most recent antibiotic, Dificid (fidaxomicin) http://www.dificid.com is the first medication approved by FDA to treat C diff. Associated-Diarrhea CDAD in over twenty five years with superiority in sustained clinical response (5) Loperamide, diphenoxylate and bismuth medications are contraindicated as they slow the fecal transit time which extends the toxins in the gastrointestinal system.

The use of Cholestyramine has demonstrated positive results as toxins A and B bind to the resin as it passes through the intestines aiding in slowing bowel motility and assists in decreasing dehydration (9).

C.diff. spores are able to live outside of the body for a very long period of time and are resistant to most routine cleaning agents. It has also been proven that alcohol based hand sanitizers remain ineffective in eradicating C. diff. spores. In 2009 Clorox Commercial Solutions Ultra Clorox Germicidal Bleach ® was named the first and only product to obtain Federal EPA registration for killing C. diff. spores on hard, non porous surfaces when used as directed (1).

Please visit the following Page for additional information:

https://cdifffoundation.org/c-diff-infection-%e2%99%a5-home-care/

 

The CDC also recommends a 1:10 ( 1 cup bleach to 9 cups of water) dilution of bleach and water for cleaning hard non-porous surfaces keeping areas covered with solution for 10 minutes and the solution is to be mixed fresh daily.

Hand hygiene following the guidelines in HAND WASING; it is important to wash hands before entering and exiting a patient’s room (4). The spores are difficult to remove from hands; Universal Contact Precautions remain best practice for healthcare personnel and Contact Precautions for patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CDI. Prevention through education about CDI has proven effective and beneficial to environmental housekeeping departments, health care professionals, administration, patients, and their families (2)

https://cdifffoundation.org/hand-washing-updates/

 

To Join The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate Program, please contact us by email info@cdifffoundation.org  or call us toll-free 1-844-FOR-CDIF

 

 

References:

(1) Clorox registered EPA
http://www.ahe.org/ahe/learn/press-releases/2009/20090402_clorox_epa_cdiff.shtml

(2) Clostridium difficile (CDI) Infections thttp://www.cdc.gov/hai/pdfs/toolkits/CDItoolkitwhite_clearance_edits.pdf
(3) Lab Tests and Diagnosis Mayo Clinichttp://www.mayoclinic.com/health/c-difficile/DS00736/DSECTION=tests-and-diagnosis
(4) CDC Hand washing
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/HandWashing/

(5) FDA announcement Dificid
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm257024.htm

(5) Dificid.com
http://www.dificid.com

(6) Probiotics in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3105609/

(6) Danimals PRNewswire8/Jan2012;
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dannonr-danimalsr-adds-proven-benefits-of-probiotics-53347947.html

(7) Get smart antibiotics week CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6144a7.htm

(8) Metronidazole
http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/flagyl

(9) Cholestyranine
http://www.globalrph.com/cholestyramine.htm

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

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September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Cdiff2015-1Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

CDiffAwarenessRibbon2015

Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

DoubleTreeLogo

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

Follow us on Twitter
@cdiffFoundation
#Cdiff2016

C. diff. Survivors Share Their Journey Through a C. diff. Infection (CDI) On C diff Spores and More, C diff Radio

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015

What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?

Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

 

UPCOMING SHOW:  Tuesday, May 12th: 

C diff survivors share their unique journey through a C diff infection and how it changed their lives forever

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report published in
February 2015, almost 500,000 C.diff. infections occurred in the U.S. in 2011, with 83,000 recurrences.

Join our guests – all  C. diff. survivor’s – who have been touched by this horrific
and life changing infection.

Heather Clark, Veronica Edmond, Renetta Dudzinski, and Lisa Hurka Covington bravely share their unique journey through a C. diff. infection that forever changed their lives.

 http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

…… we strongly recommend having a box of tissues nearby ………..

 

Listen in live at:     11a Pacific, 12p Mountain, 1p Central, 2p Eastern time

We are so excited to share  C. diff. Spores and More” with you because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

• More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes.

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection. Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a
C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.
Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience a recurrence of the infection

Older Americans are quite vulnerable to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of acquiring a C. diff. infection. The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed            C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” spotlights world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more.

Through these interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Please join us Tuesdays in listening to the educational episodes of C. diff. Spores and More”

View the programs and radio information and access previous episodes available as a podcast by clicking on the link below:

www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

healthwellnesshealth (2)

C. difficile infections With Challenging Nutritional Intake Imbalances; Malnutrition

NurseCadeceus

A C. difficile infection effects the gastrointestinal system.

What Is the Gastrointestinal System?
The human gastrointestinal system or GI tract, is an organ system responsible for consuming and digesting food, absorbing nutrients, and expelling waste (fecal matter).  The whole digestive tract is about nine meters (30 feet) in length. (1)

  1. Food enters through the mouth and is broken down by saliva and the act of chewing. It passes through the esophagus until it reaches the stomach.
  2. The stomach uses acids and enzymes to convert food into a semi-liquid state called chyme. The stomach then expels the chyme into the small intestine.
  3. The small intestine is the portal for all nutrients to enter into the bloodstream. Crucial digestive enzymes and hormones secreted from the pancreas, liver, and gallbladder break down the semi-liquid chyme into molecules small enough to be absorbed into the bloodstream.
  4. Any leftover food goes into the large intestine, where it is converted into solid waste with the help of bacteria. Water and salts are extracted from any undigested food. The end-product (fecal matter) is expelled through the rectum and anus.

Malnutrition may be broadly defined as nutritional imbalance.

More specifically, it has been defined by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as consisting of any two or more of the following:

  • Insufficient  intake
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Loss of subcutaneous fat
  • Localized or generalized fluid accumulation that may mask weight loss
  • Diminished functional status as measured by hand-grip strength

(1) http://naturopathconnect.com

Patients who are nutritionally challenged and have subsequently restrict their diets to an excessive degree are at higher risk for micro-nutrient and macro-nutrient deficiency. Deficiencies can arise from altered nutrition and poor intake from many illnesses.

A Zinc deficiency may present with a rash that can resemble contact dermatitis or seborrheic dermatitis and can be best described as eczematous pink scaly plaques that may evolve into vesicular, bullous, pustular, or desquamative lesions. Patients with severe zinc deficiency will experience growth delay, mental slowing, poor wound healing, anemia, photophobia, hypogeusia, and anorexia. Zinc is an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining a sense of smell, keeping a healthy immune system, building proteins, triggering enzymes, and creating DNA. Zinc also helps the cells in your body communicate by functioning as a neurotransmitter. A deficiency in zinc can lead to stunted growth, diarrhea, impotence, hair loss, eye and skin lesions, impaired appetite, and depressed immunity. Conversely, consuming too much zinc can lead to nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and headaches in the short term, and can disrupt absorption of copper and iron in the long term. If you have a zinc deficiency, then animal foods are better sources of zinc than plant foods.  Main foods high in Zinc:  Lamb, Wheat-germ, Spinach, Pork, Chicken, Beans.

Vitamin C plays an important role in maintaining connective tissue by virtue of its effect on the hydroxylation of proline and lysine. Patients with scurvy are prone to easy bruising, hemorrhage, fatigue, weakness, and gingivitis. Treatment consists of oral repletion of vitamin C. Foods high in Vitamin C include bell peppers (yellow), dark leafy greens, kiwis, broccoli, berries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, peas, and papayas.

The elderly patients, and patients nutritionally challenged (e.g. C. diff. infections, IBS, Crohn’s, etc.) are at higher risks for developing protein engery malnutrition (PEM) as a consequence of several factors. One is from the inability to maintain adequate nutrition due to the symptoms created by  a C. difficile infection and other GI diagnosis.  Secondary is related to the loss of employment and wages resulting in the inability to acquire food and food products/supplements. Long-term poor nutrition can also result in poor oral health and dental problems which can also lead to difficulty in chewing.  There are many factors that can lead to malnutrition. * Discussing dietary challenges with a healthcare provider is important and asking for a dietary consult with a Registered Dietician is always helpful *  Protein is also essential for the healing of wounds. Accordingly, increasing this patient’s protein intake is a priority. A deficiency in protein leads to muscle atrophy, and impaired functioning of the human body in general. High protein foods include meat, fish, cheese, tofu, beans, eggs, lentils, yogurt, Not everybody needs the same amount of protein. (2) Protein servings of meat, poultry, or fish, should be the size and thickness of the palm of your hand, That’s about a 3-ounce portion. Meat eaters eat no more than two palm-sized servings of meat a day to get enough — but not too much — protein.  Patients with decreased kidney functions need to discuss dietary needs with their healthcare professional and referral/consult with a Registered Dietician for guidance.  To look at it another way, protein should take up no more than one-third of your plate at meals, whether it’s in a form you can drink or chew, Include small amounts of protein foods at every meal to spread your intake evenly throughout the day. (2)

(2) Wedmd.com

Malnutrition can also be diagnosed with a CT scan: A patient can be diagnosed with malnutrition from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with significant weight changes and altered bowel habits. In addition, the albumin level, if checked, will be low = malnutrition.

Physical findings that are associated with PEM (Protein – energy Malnutrition) include the following:

  • Decreased subcutaneous tissue: Areas that are most affected are the legs, arms, buttocks, and face
  • Edema: Areas that are most affected are the distal extremities and anasarca (generalized edema)
  • Oral changes: Cheilosis, angular stomatitis, and papillar atrophy
  • Abdominal findings: Abdominal distention secondary to poor abdominal musculature and hepatomegaly secondary to fatty infiltration
  • Skin changes: Dry, peeling skin with raw, exposed areas; hyperpigmented plaques over areas of trauma
  • Nail changes: Fissured or ridged nails
  • Hair changes: Thin, sparse, brittle hair that is easily pulled out

Protein Studies include:  Measures of protein nutritional status include levels of the following:

  • Serum albumin
  • Retinol-binding protein
  • Prealbumin
  • Transferrin
  • Creatinine
  • Blood urea nitrogen

* If a loved one or if you are nutritionally challenged at any time, from any illness, contact your healthcare provider as soon as possible and discuss the symptoms and complications associated with maintaining an adequate nutritional diet or hydration.  Clear liquid diets are ONLY for three days and Full Liquid diets are ONLY to be used during the direct healthcare provider supervision and frequent monitoring.

 

* The information provided on the website is for educational use only and not for physical or mental health assessment, diagnosis, or treatment for any illness or symptoms.  Please see disclaimer.  Always seek medical care and contact healthcare providers as soon as possible for full medical exams, diagnosis, and treatments. Thank you.

C. diff. and Healthcare-Associated Infections Discussed Live on C. diff. Radio

CdiffRadioPost

#CdiffRadio

C Diff Foundation, Sponsor, with Founder            Nancy C. Caralla, Executive Director and               Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, Chairperson of the Research and Development Community will be broadcasting live on Tuesdays delivering the most up-to-date information pertaining to a leading super-bug/ Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI),  C. difficile, with additional HAI’s, and a variety of related healthcare topics.

Topic experts will be joining your hosts to discuss prevention, treatments, clinical trials, and environmental safety products on a global level.

Tune in Tuesdays beginning March 3rd at 11 AM Pacific Time (2 PM Eastern Time, 7 PM UK) on the VoiceAmerica network  http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

C. diff. Radio talk show “C.diff. Spores and More” debuts on Tuesday, March 3rd

What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?

Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

#Cdiffradio

We invite you to join us in listening to this exciting, new internet talk show when it debuts Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015 at the following times:

ET   2 – 3 p.m.,  CT 1 – 2 p.m.,  MT 12 – 1 p.m.,  PT 11 – 12 p.m.

We are so excited to share the debut of “C. diff. Spores and More” with you – not only because the C Diff Foundation, our Founding Executive Director –  Nancy C. Caralla, and Chairperson of Research and Development – Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, are introducing the first episode, but also because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. In March, 2012 the  CDC  said in a report that the C difficile infection kills 14,000 people a year. But that estimate is based on death certificates, which often don’t list the infection when patients die from complications, such as kidney failure.  Hospital billing data collected by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality shows that more than 9% of C. diff-related hospitalizations end in death — nearly five times the rate for other hospital stays. That adds up to more than 30,000 fatalities among the 347,000 C. diff hospitalizations in 2010. Thousands more patients are treated in nursing homes, clinics and doctors’ offices.

“We’re talking in the range of close to 500,000 total cases a year,” says Cliff McDonald, a C. diff expert and senior science adviser in the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. And annual fatalities “may well be … as high as * 30,000.”

* AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed            C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” will spotlight world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more. Through their interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Please join us in listening to the first of many episodes of C. diff. Spores and More” debuting on Tuesday, March 3rd .

View the programs and radio information:

health.voiceamerica.com

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps