Category Archives: C. diff. Survivors Alliance Network

A dedicated site for C. diff. survivors to share their stories, gather information, gain strength, and network. A survivor is one that has been touched by a C. difficile infection, one who is recovering from this infection, one who has recovered yet lives with the long-lasting symptoms, and those who have experienced the loss of another person from C. difficile or C. diff. involvement. www.cdiffsurvivors.org

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, FSHEA To Chair the July 16, 2021 C. diff. Patient, Family, and Caregiver Live-Online Symposium

Scientific Advisor Prof Dale Gerding to chair C. diff. Foundation

C. diff. Patient, Family, and Caregiver Symposium

July 16th  – Live-Online beginning at 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EDT 

Register Today!

 

 

 

 

Brighton, United Kingdom – 02 July 2021 – Destiny Pharma plc (AIM: DEST), a clinical stage innovative biotechnology company focused on the development of novel medicines to prevent life-threatening infections, is pleased to announce that its Scientific Advisory Board member, Professor Dale Gerding, a world-leading expert in C. difficile infections (CDI) and the discoverer of NTCD-M3, will be chairing the “C. diff. Patient, Family, and Caregiver” Symposium, to be held virtually on 16 July 2021.

The Symposium, hosted by the C Diff Foundation, will be a gathering of healthcare professionals, practitioners, thought leaders, and C. diff. survivors focused on transforming the patient experience of people living with C. diff. infections worldwide.

Distinguished members and keynote speakers will provide insight on how to identify, evaluate, and prioritize innovations that can quickly touch the lives of patients battling C. diff. infections.

Destiny Pharma’s late-stage asset, NTCD-M3, is a novel microbiome therapeutic being developed to reduce the recurrence of C. diff. infections in the gut. CDI is the leading cause of hospital acquired infection in the US and current treatments lead to significant recurrence. In the US, there are approximately 500,000 cases of CDI each year; many of these initial cases then recur leading to 29,000 deaths per year.

NTCD-M3 has the potential to become the leading treatment for CDI, as it has shown to deliver clear advantages to both existing CDI treatment options and also to those currently in clinical development.

About Destiny Pharma plc
Destiny Pharma is a UK based, clinical stage, innovative biotechnology company focused on the development of novel medicines that can prevent life-threatening infections. Its pipeline has novel microbiome-based biotherapeutics and XF drug clinical assets including NTCD-M3, a Phase 3 ready treatment for the prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI) recurrence, which is the leading cause of hospital acquired infection in the US and also XF-73 nasal gel, which has recently completed a positive Phase 2b clinical trial targeting the prevention of post-surgical staphylococcal hospital infections including MRSA. It is also co-developing SPOR-COV, a novel, biotherapeutic product for the prevention of COVID-19 and other viral respiratory infections, and has earlier grant funded XF research projects. 

The 4th Annual Global C. diff. Awareness 2K Walks Go Virtual on September 11 and 12

The 4th Annual Global C.diff. Awareness 2K Walks Will Now Be VIRTUAL!

                   Join Us On……………….

Friday, September 11th – UK

Dr. Clokie, UK Walk Event Coordinator, will be hosting the VIRTUAL Walk in Leicester on September 11th as the UK is also under strict guidelines to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus. 

  • The Leicester VIRTUAL Walk Will Begin at 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. – UK

  • VIRTUAL Entertainment Will Begin at 10:00 a.m. UK For the Children!

Saturday, September 12th –  USA

  • The VIRTUAL Walks Will Begin at 9:00 a.m. through 12:00 p.m. EDT

  • VIRTUAL Entertainment Will Begin at 9:00 a.m. EDT For the Children!

All Registered Awareness Walkers Will Receive a T-Shirt, Giveaways, and More via: United States Postal Service To the Address Provided at the Time Of Registration.

To Learn More About the Global C. diff. Awareness Walk Event and How You Can Register, Please Click On the Green Button Below……………..

 

 

 

We are truly grateful for your efforts, support and participation
of the Annual Walk events and we look forward to virtually walking with you in September!

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together!”
~ C Diff Foundation

C. difficile Infection (C. diff.); A Survivor’s Perspective with CDI Introduction by Teena Chopra, MD,MPH,FACP,FIDSA,FSHEA

Join us on Tuesday, May 26th at 1:00 p.m. EST

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast

www.cdiffradio.com

With Doctor Teena Chopra, MD,MPH,FACP,FIDSA,FSHEA
Associate Professor of Medicine,Division of Infectious Diseases,
Corporate Medical Director,Infection Prevention,Epidemiology,and Antibiotic Stewardship ,DMC and WSU Director,Infection Prevention,Epidemiology and Antibiotic Stewardship,Vibra Hospital

Dr. Chopra will lead the discussion with an overview of a C. difficile infection followed by Alba Muhlfeld, and Renata Johnson, C. diff. Survivors both sharing their journey and providing
key-points to our global listeners.

Unable to listen to the live broadcast?

Access the C. diff. Spores and More Library
http://www.cdiffradio.com
and listen at your leisure.

 

 

C. diff. Spores and More is sponsored by

Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond, Author, Health Coach, C.diff. And Breast Cancer Survivor Raises CDI Awareness

 

Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond, Author, Health Coach,
C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate, C. diff. and
Stage 3 Breast Cancer Survivor joined us on
September 20th, 2016, at the
4th Annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo in Atlanta, Georgia.

Veronica bravely shared her tormenting, painful experience encountered with a C. difficile infection while simultaneously undergoing  treatment for Breast Cancer.

We are grateful for her full recovery from this life-threatening diagnosis and infection and for the positive attitude Veronica has in promoting breast health, wellness, and raising C.diff. awareness.

Thank you Veronica and to all fellow C.diff.  Survivors  www.cdiffsurvivors.org  sharing their inspirational journey

“No one can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

C.diff. Survivor

 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving is a great time to reflect on the year’s blessings, reconnect with family, share a big meal and sometimes get indigestion. Often times, the overindulgence of a variety of foods may cause an upset stomach or stomach bug.

To be blunt, the rapid expansion of the stomach and foods rich in creams, sugar, and fat can cause gas, bloating and diarrhea. In most cases, the stomach discomfort is temporary and, with over-the-counter medicine, the symptoms are gone.

When should you be concerned, if the usual remedies are ineffective to control diarrhea?

One of the answers is when the pain from diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever is so severe that it lands you in the emergency room. In Veronica “Raunnie” Edmond’s case, she was already hospitalized during her second round of chemotherapy for an aggressive form of stage 3 breast cancer.

Please click on the link below to be redirected to this most admirable story shared by Veronica with Marie Y. Lemelle, Contributing Columnist at Wave Newspapers

http://wavenewspapers.com/health-matters-a-case-of-diarrhea-that-almost-turned-deadly/

 

Marie Y. Lemelle, MBA, a public relations consultant, is the owner of Platinum Star PR and can be reached on Twitter @PlatinumStar, or Instagram @PlatinumStarPR. Send “Health Matters” related questions to healthmatters@wavepublication.com and look for her column in The Wave.

“What is C. diff.?” One Woman Walked Up To Us And Asked – Then the Crowd Followed

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates; Heather Clark and
her sister, Kimberly Reilly participated at local events over the summer season  to educate and advocate
for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety within the local communities raising C. diff. awareness and saving lives.

 

On behalf of the C Diff Foundation , we sincerely thank you Heather and Kimberly for your dedication, your time, and for joining the
C Diff Foundation partnering and sharing our global mission.

We are truly grateful to the many special Volunteer Patient Advocates, the special individuals donating their time in “Raising C. diff. Awareness within their communities” around the globe.  Thank You!

Heather and Kimberly lost their dear Father from C.diff. involvement.  Shortly after his passing,  Heather and Kimberly took a stand with the C Diff Foundation and dedicated their time and efforts in  “Raising C. diff. Awareness” to help educate, and advocate for this life-threatening infection that played a big part in their Father’s passing.

To listen to Heather’s journey, with fellow C. diff. survivors,  – please click on the podcast link below:

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/85287/c-diff-survivors-share-their-unique-journey-through-a-c-diff-infection-and-how-it-changed-their

“What is C. diff.?”

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) is gram-positive, anaerobic, and a spore, rod/spindle-shape,
a common bacterium of the human intestine in 2 – 5%. C diff. becomes a serious gastrointestinal infection when individuals have been exposed to antibiotic therapy, and/or have experienced a long-term hospitalization, and/or have had an extended stay in a long-term care facility. However; the risk of acquiring a C diff. infection (CDI) has increased as it is in the community (Community Acquired CDI) and found in outpatient settings.

There are significant risk factors in patients who are immunosuppressant, ones who have been on antibiotic therapy, and the elderly population.

How do Antibiotics cause C diff.? The antibiotics cause a disruption in the normal intestinal flora which leads to an over growth of C difficile bacteria in the colon. The leading antibiotics known to disrupt the normal intestinal flora, yet not limited to, are Ampicillin, Amoxicillin, Cephalosporins, Clindamycin, and the broad spectrum antibiotics.

Since  November 2012 the CDC has shared public announcements regarding antibiotic use: Colds and many ear and sinus infections are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Taking antibiotics to treat a “virus” can make those drugs less effective when you and your family really need them. Limiting the usage of antibiotics will also help limit new cases of CDI.
*Always discuss the symptoms and medications with the treating Physician.

What are C.diff. Symptoms? Symptoms of Clostridium difficile (C.diff.)
C.diff. strains produce several toxins; the most popular are enterotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin A and cytotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin B.  Both strains are responsible for the symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and can advance to a complication of a severe inflammation of the colon; pseudomembranous colitis, which can also lead to further complications of toxic megacolon.

How is C.diff. Transmitted? Mode of transmission of CDI can be either directly or indirectly, hospital acquired (nosocomial) or community – acquired; Ingesting C.diff spores transmitted from others and patients by hands, or altered normal intestinal flora by antibiotic therapy allowing proliferation of C.diff.  in the colon.  Coming in contact with surfaces, devices, or material with Clostridium difficile spores can easily be transferred to individuals by hands that have touched a contaminated surface or item. Examples of surfaces, devices, and materials contaminated with C.diff. spores in hospital and community/outpatient settings: commodes, bath tubs, showers, hand rails, bed rails, counter tops, handles, clothing, medical equipment, and electronic rectal thermometers.

The C Diff Foundation provide a wide range of programs, such as education, and advocacy for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide, training of volunteer patient advocates (VPA’s) across the globe to provide educational workshops, supplying life-saving medications for those afflicted with this infection from young children to seniors, building satellite branches across the globe, presenting educational workshops in educational programs, improving and expanding the C. difficile infection awareness, providing global tele-conferencing support sessions in mental health counseling, long-term illnesses, the prevention, treatments, environmental safety with nutritional education for patients, and families suffering through a C. difficile infection
and so much more.

We are working together and dedicated at raising C. diff. awareness to witness a decrease in newly diagnosed C. difficile infections worldwide and through dedication and efforts of the
C Diff Foundation Volunteers – we will meet our goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treatments For CDI?   Treating C diff is becoming more challenging to physicians, frustrating to patients, and costly to the health care industry. To date there are three antibiotics effective at treating C diff: Metronidazole is prescribed to treat mild to moderate symptoms and is cost effective (8). Vancomycin is prescribed for moderate to severe symptoms via: oral route as intravenous administration does not achieve gut lumen therapeutic levels. Vancomycin is prescribed to patients with unsuccessful results from the Metronidazole, or the patient is allergic, or pregnant, breastfeeding, or younger than ten years of age.

The most recent antibiotic, Dificid (fidaxomicin) http://www.dificid.com is the first medication approved by FDA to treat C diff. Associated-Diarrhea CDAD in over twenty five years with superiority in sustained clinical response (5) Loperamide, diphenoxylate and bismuth medications are contraindicated as they slow the fecal transit time which extends the toxins in the gastrointestinal system.

The use of Cholestyramine has demonstrated positive results as toxins A and B bind to the resin as it passes through the intestines aiding in slowing bowel motility and assists in decreasing dehydration (9).

C.diff. spores are able to live outside of the body for a very long period of time and are resistant to most routine cleaning agents. It has also been proven that alcohol based hand sanitizers remain ineffective in eradicating C. diff. spores. In 2009 Clorox Commercial Solutions Ultra Clorox Germicidal Bleach ® was named the first and only product to obtain Federal EPA registration for killing C. diff. spores on hard, non porous surfaces when used as directed (1).

Please visit the following Page for additional information:

https://cdifffoundation.org/c-diff-infection-%e2%99%a5-home-care/

 

The CDC also recommends a 1:10 ( 1 cup bleach to 9 cups of water) dilution of bleach and water for cleaning hard non-porous surfaces keeping areas covered with solution for 10 minutes and the solution is to be mixed fresh daily.

Hand hygiene following the guidelines in HAND WASING; it is important to wash hands before entering and exiting a patient’s room (4). The spores are difficult to remove from hands; Universal Contact Precautions remain best practice for healthcare personnel and Contact Precautions for patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CDI. Prevention through education about CDI has proven effective and beneficial to environmental housekeeping departments, health care professionals, administration, patients, and their families (2)

https://cdifffoundation.org/hand-washing-updates/

 

To Join The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate Program, please contact us by email info@cdifffoundation.org  or call us toll-free 1-844-FOR-CDIF

 

 

References:

(1) Clorox registered EPA
http://www.ahe.org/ahe/learn/press-releases/2009/20090402_clorox_epa_cdiff.shtml

(2) Clostridium difficile (CDI) Infections thttp://www.cdc.gov/hai/pdfs/toolkits/CDItoolkitwhite_clearance_edits.pdf
(3) Lab Tests and Diagnosis Mayo Clinichttp://www.mayoclinic.com/health/c-difficile/DS00736/DSECTION=tests-and-diagnosis
(4) CDC Hand washing
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/HandWashing/

(5) FDA announcement Dificid
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm257024.htm

(5) Dificid.com
http://www.dificid.com

(6) Probiotics in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3105609/

(6) Danimals PRNewswire8/Jan2012;
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dannonr-danimalsr-adds-proven-benefits-of-probiotics-53347947.html

(7) Get smart antibiotics week CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6144a7.htm

(8) Metronidazole
http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/flagyl

(9) Cholestyranine
http://www.globalrph.com/cholestyramine.htm