Category Archives: C. diff. and Sepsis

September Is SEPSIS Awareness Month; Learn More With the CDC and Worldwide Organizations Raising Awareness; It’s A Race Against Time

Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

Sepsis Awareness Month is in September. SEP for Sepsis.
SEP for September – making September the perfect month for Sepsis Awareness Month 

30 Days to Highlight Sepsis

September is Sepsis Awareness Month and for 30 days, Sepsis Alliance www.sepsis.org and sepsis advocates pull out all the stops to spread the word about what sepsis is, what it does, and how we can make a difference and save lives.

Faces of Sepsis:

PoppaManihat

 

 

 

 

http://www.sepsis.org/faces/michael-j-caralla-sr/

Sepsis hits home and is no stranger to the Foundress of the C diff Foundation or to the millions of families who have lost loved ones from Sepsis.  Loosing a loved one from Septic Shock with C.diff. involvement is devastating for any family.  The C Diff Foundation supports and joins the organizations raising Sepsis awareness worldwide and we encourage everyone to join in the global efforts being made to help save lives.

Click on the Logo below to listen to the Podcast from a live broadcast on “C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network  “Sepsis; Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide”  with guests  Dr. Tex Kissoon, MD,a well-known doctor from Canada, will provide us with the insight into the global phenomenon of Sepsis. Sepsis affects more than 30 million lives per year yet it is almost unknown to the general public and is quite often misdiagnosed by medical professionals worldwide. The reasons of why that is with the “why” Sepsis is so deadly, and what you can do to increase Sepsis awareness– will be discussed in the next 60 minutes. Dr. Kissoon is joined by Ray Schachter, a Sepsis survivor who has dedicated all of his available time to combating and raising awareness of Sepsis worldwide. Both are members of the Global Sepsis Alliance, which has established World Sepsis Day on September 13th every year to raise awareness for Sepsis worldwide.

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015

 

World Sepsis Day is September 13th

worldSepsisDay

Free online congress on September 8- 9, 2016
Register now!

http://www.world-sepsis-day.org/?MET=HOME&vLANGUAGE=EN

worldsepsisbanner

SepsisCDC710

 

Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

SepsisCDCThinkSepsis

“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

SepsisCDCBannerHealthcareMatters

According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

###

CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

Learn More About The Signs and Symptoms Of Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

SepsisCDC710

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

SepsisCDCThinkSepsis

“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

SepsisCDCBannerHealthcareMatters

According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

###

CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

 

SepsisCDCKnowSigns

 

 

Septic Shock; Reviewed by Dr. F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCF on MedPage Today

Norepinephrine has long been the stable pressor agent for sepsis, but new data suggest that vasopressin might offer unique benefits. In this “150 Second Analysis”, MedPage Today clinical reviewer F. Perry Wilson discusses a study pitting the two drugs head-to-head, with an eye on renal failure as the primary outcome.

F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE, is an assistant professor of medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. He earned his BA from Harvard University, graduating with honors with a degree in biochemistry. He then attended Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. From there he moved to Philadelphia to complete his internal medicine residency and nephrology fellowship at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. During his post graduate years, he also obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is an accomplished author of many scientific articles and holds several NIH grants. He is a MedPage Today reviewer, and in addition to his video analyses, he authors a blog, The Methods Man. You can follow @methodsmanmd on Twitter.

Also visit the link to view the video:

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Nephrology/GeneralNephrology/59463

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

Cdiff2015BallroomPic

September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

TAtlantaPic

Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

###

Cdiff2015-1Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

CDiffAwarenessRibbon2015

Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

DoubleTreeLogo

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

Follow us on Twitter
@cdiffFoundation
#Cdiff2016

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Releases An Update To the “Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: Management Bundle”

 cms.gov-footer

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Issues Sepsis Measure Update

While many sepsis cases are due to unknown organisms and broad spectrum antibiotic selection is appropriate, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is releasing an update to the Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: Management Bundle measure to allow for organism specific antibiotic administration when there is clinician documentation that indicates the causative organism and susceptibility are known.

The specification update also allows for organism specific antibiotic treatment of C. difficile suspected sepsis.

The measure update is included in version 5.2 of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Manual in the section on sepsis.

Version 5.1 of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Manual was posted on QualityNet in December 2015 and is available here: https://www.qualitynet.org/dcs/ContentServer?c=Page&pagename=QnetPublic%2FPage%2FQnetTier3&cid=1228775436944.

Version 5.1 becomes effective July 1, 2016, so the changes to the Sepsis measure also affect this version.

CDC and CMS believe that antibiotic stewardship and optimal sepsis management are complimentary efforts that both serve to improve patient care

 

Resource:  CDC Digest Bulletin

cdc.gov

“Sepsis Knows No Boundaries; It Can Happen To Anyone” Discussed on C. diff. Spores and More With Guests Carl Flatley,DDS, Sherrie Dornberger,RN, and Hudson Garrett, Jr, PhD

 

Listen In On Tuesday, April 26th

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015
To access the live broadcast and Podcast Library
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
please click on the logo above *

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This week’s episode——

“Sepsis Knows No Boundaries; It Can Happen To Anyone”

TO DOWNLOAD AN INFORMATION GUIDE, COURTESY OF SEPSIS ALLIANCE, PLEASE

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

http://www.sepsis.org/files/sig_sepsisandcdifficile.pdf

Our Guests:

Dr. Carl Flatley, DDS, MSD

Sherrie Dornberger, RN,CDONA, GDCN, CDP, CADDCT, FACDONA
Clinician and Sepsis Survivor

Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr. PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC™ , C-NAC™ , PLNC

 

In this episode Sepsis will be defined by three Healthcare Clinicians and one Clinician — a Sepsis survivor.  According to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics estimates that, based upon information collected for billing purposes, the number of times people were in the hospital with sepsis or septicemia (another word for sepsis) increased from 621,000 in the year 2000 to 1,141,000 in 2008. Between 28 and 50 percent of people who get sepsis die.

Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection.  If sepsis progresses to septic shock, blood pressure drops dramatically, which may lead to death. Anyone can develop sepsis, but it’s most common and most dangerous in older adults or those with weakened immune systems. Early treatment of sepsis improves chances for survival.

MORE ABOUT OUR GUESTS:

Carl Flatley, DDS, MSD
On April 30, 2002, Carl Flatley’s life changed. It was the day his daughter
Erin died from Septic shock, something Dr. Flatley, a retired Endodontist,had never heard of.
After Erin’s death, Dr. Flatley learned everything he could about sepsis and he was
astounded at what he – and millions of other Americans – didn’t know about the condition.
He was shocked to learn that sepsis killed well over 200,000 people in the U.S. every year
and affected so many more survivors. In 2004, Dr. Flatley founded the American Sepsis Alliance,which in 2007,became Sepsis Alliance. He made it his mission that sepsis would become as well  known as cancer, diabetes, and other illnesses, and that as few people as possible would  get sepsis, let alone die from it. His unending devotion to Erin’s memory has had a  significant impact on many people.

Sherrie Dornberger, RN,CDONA, GDCN, CDP, CADDCT, FACDONA
Clinician and Sepsis Survivor
NADONA/LTC is a Nurse specialty organization representing the nurse leaders within the long term care continuum association with a mission to support and promote quality of care for those individuals receiving long term care, and concern for those delivering long term care. NADONA/LTC has nominated Sherrie Dornberger as their designated representative. Sherrie is the current Executive Director of NADONA/LTC, and is a Registered Nurse with 40+ years of experience in Nursing Administration, Long Term Care, and Infection Prevention.

Hudson Garrett, Jr. PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC™ , C-NAC™ , PLNC
Dr. Garrett is a recognized international expert in infection prevention and control.
Dr Garrett currently serves as the Chairperson of the Education Committee for the
C Diff Foundation, and Vice President, Clinical Affairs PDI, Inc. and is a graduate of the
Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. He was honored  as a Who’s Who for Infection Control by Infection Control Today Magazine in 2013 in recognition of his contributions to the field.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

 

Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™  is made possible through our official  Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

CloroxHealthcare_72

 

 

 

 

Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide Discussed on C. diff. Spores and More With Guests Dr. Kissoon and Ray Schachter

 

Live Broadcast on Tuesday, April 5th

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015

Access this program Podcast on
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
by clicking on the logo above *

Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide

 

On Tuesday, April 5th our guests Dr. Niranjan “Tex” Kissoon and Sepsis Survivor Ray Schachter discussed Sepsis – Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide. 

In this episode Tex Kissoon, MD,a well-known physician from Canada, provided us with the insight into the global phenomenon of Sepsis. Sepsis affects more than 30 million lives per year yet it is almost unknown to the general public and is quite often misdiagnosed by medical professionals worldwide. The reasons of why that is with the “why” Sepsis is so deadly, and what you can do to increase Sepsis awareness– were discussed in  60 minutes. Dr. Kissoon was joined by Ray Schachter, a Sepsis survivor who now dedicates all of his available time raising awareness of Sepsis worldwide. Both guests are members of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA), which has established World Sepsis Day on September 13th every year to raise awareness for Sepsis worldwide.

About Our Guests:

Dr. Niranjan “Tex”  Kissoon, MD

TexKissoonMD

Dr. Kissoon is the Past President of the World Federation of Pediatric Critical and Intensive Care Societies, Vice-President, Medical Affairs at BC Children’s Hospital and Professor, Pediatric and Surgery (Emergency Medicine) Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC as well as he holds the University of British Columbia BC Children’s Hospital (UBC BCCH) Endowed Chair in Acute and Critical Care for Global Child Health.   Dr. Kissoon is the vice chair of the Global Sepsis Alliance, co-chair of World Sepsis Day and the  International Pediatric Sepsis Initiative.).  He has been involved in both advocacy and in promoting Canada-wide involvement in World Sepsis Day as part of a global initiative. He is also involved in promoting sepsis guidelines such that appropriate treatments are given even in areas where there are limited resources.

Dr. Kissoon was awarded a Distinguished Career Award by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2013 for his contribution to the society and discipline as well as the prestigious Society of Critical Care Medicine’s (SCCM) Master of Critical Care Medicine award in 2015 in recognition of his tireless efforts and achievements as a prominent and distinguished leader of national and international stature.  He was also awarded the BNS Walia PGIMER Golden Jubilee Oration 2015 Award for major contribution to Pediatrics in India from the Postgraduate Institute Medical Education and Research. 

A Direct Quote From Our Guest and Sepsis Survivor;  Ray Schachter:

RayS

“I miraculously survived acute Sepsis in 1996 due to extensive medical intervention and have experienced the immediate and long-term consequences on me and my family.  I am the Chair of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA) Task Force whose goal is to have the UN mandate Sepsis as a World Health Day. Working with these very accomplished and committed people from GSA, many of whom are on the GSA Executive or Ambassadors, on this important project is a very special opportunity.”

About The Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA):
Sepsis is one of the most underestimated health risks. It affects more than 30 million people worldwide each year; for 6 to 8 million of them with a fatal outcome. Surviving patients often suffer for years from late complications.
This is all the more disturbing as sepsis incidence could be considerably reduced by some simple preventive measures such as vaccination and improved adherence to hygiene standards, early recognition and optimized treatment. The main danger of sepsis results from a lack of knowledge about it.
The founding members of the Global Sepsis Alliance (GSA) have recognized the need to elevate public, philanthropic and governmental awareness and understanding of sepsis and to accelerate collaboration among researchers, clinicians, associated working groups and those dedicated to supporting them. For this reason, they initiated the Global Sepsis Alliance in 2010. Together with supporting organizations from across the globe, we are united in one common goal:

The GSA  wants to ensure that:

  • The incidence of sepsis decreases globally by implementation of strategies to prevent sepsis.
  • Sepsis survival increases for children (including neonates) and adults in all countries through the promotion and adoption of early recognition systems and standardized emergency treatment
  • Public and professional understanding and awareness of sepsis improve
  • Access to appropriate rehabilitation services improve for all patients worldwide
  • The measurement of the global burden of sepsis and the impact of sepsis control and management interventions improve significantly

The GSA Current priorities:

  • Acknowledgement of a resolution on sepsis including official designation of World Sepsis Day (WSD) as one of the World Health Days by the World Health Assembly.
  • Recognition of sepsis in the Global Burden of Disease Report
  • Increase of public awareness and implementation of quality improvement initiatives

To learn more about the GSA please visit their websites:     http://global-sepsis-alliance.org

AND  World Sepsis Day:   http://www.world-sepsis-day.org

 

Our special thanks to GSA General Manager: Marvin Zick for his assistance in coordinating this important episode with the C. diff. Spores and More team.

 

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program.

The “C. diff. Spores and More” program is made possible
by official Sponsor:     Clorox Healthcare

CloroxHealthcare_72

 

 

 

Click on the above logo to learn more about Clorox Healthcare Products