Category Archives: C. diff. and Sepsis

The World Health Assembly and the World Health Organization Adopts Resolution To Improve Sepsis Prevention, Diagnosis, and Management

Congratulations!

On Friday, May 26th, 2017, the World Health Assembly and the World Health Organization made sepsis a global health priority, by adopting a resolution to improve, prevent, diagnose, and manage sepsis. This marks a quantum leap in the global fight against sepsis.

Sepsis, commonly referred to as ‘blood poisoning’, is the life-threatening condition that arises when the body’s response to infection results in organ dysfunction or failure.  Sepsis is often confused with other conditions in its early stages, with delayed recognition of the signs and symptoms quickly leading to multi-system organ failure and ultimately death.

The resolution urges the 194 United Nation Member States to implement appropriate measures to reduce the human and health economic burden of sepsis. In the USA alone, sepsis causes or contributes to half of all deaths in hospitals and has become the leading cause of annual hospitals costs, at over 24 billion USD per year.

The resolution also requests the Director-General of the WHO, Dr. Margaret Chan, to draw attention to the public health impact of sepsis and to 1) publish a report on sepsis and its global consequences by the end of 2018, 2) support the Member States adequately, 3) collaborate with other UN organizations, and 4) report to the 2020 WHA on the implementation of this resolution.

“Community-acquired and health care-acquired sepsis represent a huge global burden that has been estimated to be 31 million cases every year, six million of which result in death,” said Dr. Chan. “One in ten patients world-wide acquires one health care associated infection which often manifests itself with sepsis conditions. I commend the member states for the content of the resolution on sepsis which point to key actions that need to be taken to reverse these shocking statistics.”

The WHO has allocated $4.6 million USD to help implement their sepsis resolution.

The adoption of sepsis as a global priority was initiated by the Global Sepsis Alliance who gathered the consensus and authority of clinicians and families from over 70 countries.

“Worldwide, sepsis is one of the most common deadly diseases, and it is one of the few conditions to strike with equal ferocity in resource-poor areas and in the developed world,” said Dr. Konrad Reinhart, Chairman of the Global Sepsis Alliance.  “In the developed world, sepsis is dramatically increasing by an annual rate of 5-13 per cent over the last decade, and now claims more lives than bowel and breast cancer combined.  When sepsis is quickly recognized and treated, lives are saved but health care providers need better training because they are the critical link to preventing, recognizing, and treating sepsis.”

 

Learn more  by accessing the GSA link:

https://www.global-sepsis-alliance.org/news/2017/5/26/wha-adopts-resolution-on-sepsis

September Is SEPSIS Awareness Month; Learn More With the CDC and Worldwide Organizations Raising Awareness; It’s A Race Against Time

Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

Sepsis Awareness Month is in September. SEP for Sepsis.
SEP for September – making September the perfect month for Sepsis Awareness Month 

30 Days to Highlight Sepsis

September is Sepsis Awareness Month and for 30 days, Sepsis Alliance www.sepsis.org and sepsis advocates pull out all the stops to spread the word about what sepsis is, what it does, and how we can make a difference and save lives.

Faces of Sepsis:

 

 

 

 

http://www.sepsis.org/faces/michael-j-caralla-sr/

Sepsis hits home and is no stranger to the Foundress of the C diff Foundation or to the millions of families who have lost loved ones from Sepsis.  Loosing a loved one from Septic Shock with C.diff. involvement is devastating for any family.  The C Diff Foundation supports and joins the organizations raising Sepsis awareness worldwide and we encourage everyone to join in the global efforts being made to help save lives.

Click on the Logo below to listen to the Podcast from a live broadcast on “C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network  “Sepsis; Number One Preventable Cause of Death Worldwide”  with guests  Dr. Tex Kissoon, MD,a well-known doctor from Canada, will provide us with the insight into the global phenomenon of Sepsis. Sepsis affects more than 30 million lives per year yet it is almost unknown to the general public and is quite often misdiagnosed by medical professionals worldwide. The reasons of why that is with the “why” Sepsis is so deadly, and what you can do to increase Sepsis awareness– will be discussed in the next 60 minutes. Dr. Kissoon is joined by Ray Schachter, a Sepsis survivor who has dedicated all of his available time to combating and raising awareness of Sepsis worldwide. Both are members of the Global Sepsis Alliance, which has established World Sepsis Day on September 13th every year to raise awareness for Sepsis worldwide.

 

World Sepsis Day is September 13th

Free online congress on September 8- 9, 2016
Register now!

http://www.world-sepsis-day.org/?MET=HOME&vLANGUAGE=EN

 

Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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Learn More About The Signs and Symptoms Of Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

 

 

 

Septic Shock; Reviewed by Dr. F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCF on MedPage Today

Norepinephrine has long been the stable pressor agent for sepsis, but new data suggest that vasopressin might offer unique benefits. In this “150 Second Analysis”, MedPage Today clinical reviewer F. Perry Wilson discusses a study pitting the two drugs head-to-head, with an eye on renal failure as the primary outcome.

F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE, is an assistant professor of medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. He earned his BA from Harvard University, graduating with honors with a degree in biochemistry. He then attended Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. From there he moved to Philadelphia to complete his internal medicine residency and nephrology fellowship at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. During his post graduate years, he also obtained a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is an accomplished author of many scientific articles and holds several NIH grants. He is a MedPage Today reviewer, and in addition to his video analyses, he authors a blog, The Methods Man. You can follow @methodsmanmd on Twitter.

Also visit the link to view the video:

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Nephrology/GeneralNephrology/59463

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

T

Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

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REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

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 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

Michael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

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