Tag Archives: ECCMID

Two UK Researchers, Prof.Alistair Leanord and Dr. David Enoch, Present CDI Data At the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID)

Repeated infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. difficile, C.diff.), which causes abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea is linked to higher death rates, as well as having a significant impact on health services in terms of cost and hospital beds occupied.

In the first of two presentations at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) (tomorrow (Saturday), Professor Alistair Leanord, from Glasgow University, UK, will say that in Scotland the extra impact on the health service from C. difficile infections amounted to 10,600 bed days a year. “This is the equivalent to a 30-bed hospital ward being fully occupied all year,” he will say.

He will tell the congress that the (median) average cost of a patient with C. difficile infection was £7,500 (€8,600 approximately) compared to £2,800 (€3,200 approx) for patients with other medical conditions. In Scotland over a one year period, from October 2015 to October 2016, there were 1,150 cases of C. difficile infection in patients aged 15 and over. This cost the National Health Service (NHS) in Scotland a total of £8,650,000. Out of this amount, the additional costs of treating C. difficile infection, over and above the basic cost of a hospital bed and normal medical care, was £1,955,000. The calculations were carried out at Strathclyde University, which is part of the Scottish Healthcare Associated Infection Prevention Institute (SHAIPI) research consortium.

Until now, little has been known about the impact on health service resources from C. difficile infections, and on patients in terms of recurrence of infection, readmission to hospital, length of stay and death rates.

Prof. Leanord and his colleagues in Scotland identified 3,304 patients with C. difficile in Scottish hospitals between 2010 and 2013 and matched them with 9,516 patients who did not have the infection (the control group). Approximately two-thirds of the C. difficile patients acquired the infection in hospital.

They found that patients with C. difficile infection had more than double the risk of dying from any cause within two months of being admitted to hospital; nearly a third of all C. difficile cases (29%) died within two months compared to 14% of patients in the control group. Patients with C. difficile stayed in hospital a (median) average 9.7 days longer than the patients without the infection. Of the 1,712 C. difficile patients who were discharged from hospital within 30 days of the first episode of infection, 59% were readmitted within six months; of the 626 cases discharged more than 30 days after the first episode 53% were readmitted within six months. Few of these re-admissions were directly related to C. difficile infection.

“However, nearly a sixth of patients (14%) who were cured of the initial infection recurred within three months, and nearly one third of them (29%) had a second recurrence within a year,” says Prof. Leanord.

Older people were more vulnerable to a recurrence. Among the patients with C. difficile infection, 22% were aged 85 or over, and patients aged 75 and over had approximately double the risk of a recurrence of the infection compared to those aged under 65. Patients aged between 65-74 had 1.5 times the risk of recurrence compared to younger patients.

Prof. Leanord will conclude: “Having a clear understanding of the nature of C. difficile infections in Scotland will allow the Scottish government to target resources at the most appropriate patients to try to reduce the overall burden of the disease on the health service. Our findings are very likely to be applicable to the rest of the UK and other countries as well.”

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In a second presentation on Saturday, Dr David Enoch, a consultant microbiologist and infection control doctor at the National Infection Service, Public Health England, Cambridge (UK), will report the outcomes of 6,874 patients who had acquired C. difficile infection in hospital between 2002 and 2013 in England. Of these, 1,141 (16.6%) had recurrences of the infection.

“We found that 49% of hospital patients who suffer a recurrent episode of C. difficile infection die within a year, compared to 38% of those who suffer an initial infection only,” he will say. “In addition, 21% of patients with a recurrence suffered other complications as well, such as dehydration, malnourished and sometimes even perforation of the bowel, compared to 18% of patients who did not have a recurrence.”

Dr Enoch estimates that there are approximately 125,000 cases of C. difficile infection in Europe each year, and between 15-30% of these recur. “Cases in the UK have been coming down since 2008, which is most probably due to improvements in antibiotic prescribing and cleaning regimens in hospitals. This is encouraging but more still needs to be done.”

The average age of the patients was 77 and the average length of stay in hospital was 38 days.

“The main risk factor for developing C. difficile infection is prior antibiotic use. These patients are often already ill from some other underlying illness, which explains why they needed antibiotics in the first place. Older people are at greater risk of C. difficile infection as they are often sicker, have other illnesses or conditions, and so need more antibiotics,” he will say.

Dr Enoch continues: “Although much has been done, particularly in the UK, to try to prevent C. difficile infection, strict adherence to antibiotic guidelines by clinicians and thorough cleaning of the hospital environment are crucial in ensuring that patients don’t develop C. difficile infection in the first place. Treatment with a new drug called fidaxomicin has also been shown to reduce the risk of recurrence in patients who are unfortunate enough to develop an infection. However, we still have a lot to learn, particularly about how C. difficile infection occurs in the community, and how best to treat it.”

Treatments for recurrences of C. difficile infection  —–  include stopping the antibiotic that made the patient susceptible to the infection and starting a different antibiotic that is effective against C. difficile infection. These antibiotics include metronidazole, vancomycin and fidaxomicin. Supportive therapy, such as extra fluids, and surgery in serious or life-threatening cases may also be necessary. Faecal transplantation is emerging as a promising option; this is a process in which the good bacteria that the gut needs but which has been killed off by antibiotics is transplanted into the patient from a healthy donor.

(CDF:  Consider contacting an organization conducting Clinical Trials to Treat and Prevent.  Click on the following link for more information :  https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

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Abstract no: #1672, presented by Prof. Alistair Leanord in the “Clostridium difficile infections: epidemiology and outcome” oral session, 16.30-18.30 hrs, Saturday 22 April, Hall A.

Abstract no: #883, presented by Dr Enoch in the “Clostridium difficile: guts and glory” e-poster mini-oral session, 15.30-16.30 hrs, Saturday 22 April, ePoster Arena 4.

 

To read the article in its entirety – please click on the following link:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-04/esoc-cdi041917.php

Researchers Suggest a Portion Of C. diff. Cases In Europe Involve Infections Associated With Other Sources Outside of Healthcare-Associated Infections

As part of a multicenter study, investigators from the University of Oxford, the University of Leeds, Astellas Pharma Europe, and elsewhere used a combination of ribotyping, sequencing, phylogenetics, and geographic analyses to retrace the genetic diversity and potential sources of C. difficile isolates involved in infections in European hospitals.

Recent research suggests a proportion of Clostridium difficile cases in Europe involve not only hospital-acquired infections but also infections associated with other sources, such as food.

As stated in the article:

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/clostridium-difficile-genetic-patterns-europe-point-possible-infection-sources-beyond?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GWDN%20Mon%20PM%202017-04-24&utm_term=GW%20Daily%20News%20Bulletin

David Eyre, a clinical lecturer at the University of Oxford, was slated to present the work at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases annual 2017 meeting in Vienna this past weekend. The study was funded by Astellas Pharma’s Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) program.

“We don’t know much about how C. difficile might be spread in the food chain, but this research suggests it may be very widespread,” Eyre said in a statement. “If that turns out to be the case, then we need to focus on some new preventative strategies such as vaccination in humans once this is possible, or we might need to look at our use of animal fertilizers on crops.”

“This study doesn’t give us any definitive answers,” he explained, “but it does suggest other factors [than hospital infections] are at play in the spread of C. difficile and more research is urgently needed to pin them down.”

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Some of the strains clustered by locale, consistent with spread from one individual to the next, for example in a healthcare setting. But more unexpectedly, the team also saw strains smattered across seemingly unconnected sites. And because at least one of those strains had previously been linked to pig farming, the researchers speculated that some infections may have been transmitted through food sources.

 

To read the article in its entirety click on the following link:

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/clostridium-difficile-genetic-patterns-europe-point-possible-infection-sources-beyond?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GWDN%20Mon%20PM%202017-04-24&utm_term=GW%20Daily%20News%20Bulletin

Summit Therapeutics Unveiled Findings From the Phase 2 CoDIFy Trial Featuring the Potential Of Ridinilazole In the Treatment Of C. diff. At ECCMID

In The News

Drug development company Summit Therapeutics PLC has presented positive results from a trial of its drug that combats hospital super-bug C.diff.

The company unveiled the findings from the Phase 2 CoDIFy trial highlighting the potential of ridinilazole in the treatment of Clostridium difficile (C.diff.)  infection at what is called a poster presentation, at the 26th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).

Summit said the findings include a markedly reduced recurrence rate and a statistically superior rate of sustained clinical response in patients with CDI receiving ridinilazole, compared with those receiving the standard of care, vancomycin.

Sustained clinical response is defined as clinical cure at the end of treatment and no recurrence of the condition in 30 days after therapy.

Ridinilazole is a novel class antibiotic with the potential for broad use across the CDI disease spectrum. CDI is a serious threat in hospitals and care homes and there are between 450,000 and 700,000 cases in the US annually.

“Preventing disease recurrence is a major unmet need in CDI, both for newly diagnosed patients who are receiving initial treatment and for patients who are receiving treatment for recurrent disease,” said Dale Gerding, MD, Research Physician, Hines Veterans Affairs Hospital, Professor of Medicine, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, and an author on the presentation.

“In this context, it is very encouraging to see such a marked reduction in recurrences with ridinilazole in the Phase 2 trial,” Gerding said.

Glyn Edwards, chief executive of Summit, said: “Ridinilazole’s narrow spectrum of activity appeared to substantially reduce damage to the gut microbiome in the Phase 2 clinical trial, allowing patients to maintain or rebuild their natural defences against recurrence of CDI.”

Recurrence is a key problem as repeat episodes are typically more severe and associated with an increase in mortality rates and healthcare costs.

“The wealth of data we have reported on the compound to date, including the positive efficacy results presented today at ECCMID, suggest that ridinilazole could become a truly differentiated product with potential for broad use in CDI, including front-line treatment,” Edwards said.

Key efficacy findings from the trial presented at ECCMID were:

  • Statistical superiority in SCR with rates of 66.7% for ridinilazole compared to 42.4% for vancomycin
  • Marked reduction in recurrence with rates of 14.3% for ridinilazole compared to 34.8% for vancomycin
  • Cure rates at the end of treatment of 77.8% for ridinilazole and 69.7% for vancomycin

A copy of the poster is available from Summit’s web site .

 

To read this article in its entirety click on the following link:

http://www.proactiveinvestors.com/companies/news/124614/summit-therapeutics-plc-presents-positive-cdi-results-124614.html

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse this product or any product and this posting is strictly for informational purposes only.

Merck Shares Significant Details Associated With Their Ongoing Dedication Fighting Infectious Diseases Through More Than 30 Scientific Presentations At ECCMID

In The News:

Researchers are scheduled to provide more than 30 scientific data presentations on the company’s established and investigational infectious disease medicines and vaccines at this year’s 26th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID)

∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada,  announced that researchers are scheduled to provide more than 30 scientific data presentations on the company’s established and investigational infectious disease medicines and vaccines at this year’s 26th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID)
April 9-12 , 2016 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Presentations at ECCMID will include new data analyses from two pivotal Phase 3 clinical trials of bezlotoxumab, Merck’s investigational compound for the prevention of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection recurrence in patients on standard-of-care antibiotics for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Researchers also will present studies showing updated data on the in vitro activity of ZERBAXA® (ceftolozane and tazobactam) 1.5 g. ZERBAXA is indicated for the treatment of adults with complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including pyelonephritis, and in combination with metronidazole, complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) caused by designated susceptible Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. For more information, including a complete list of abstract titles, please visit the ECCMID website at www.eccmid.org.

Merck’s commitment to infectious diseases

For more than 80 years, Merck has contributed to the discovery and development of novel medicines and vaccines to combat infectious diseases. In addition to a combined portfolio of antibiotic and antifungal medicines, vaccines, and medicines for HIV and HCV, Merck has multiple programs that span discovery through late-stage development. Merck currently has 10 compounds in Phase 2/Phase 3 clinical trials for the potential treatment or prevention of infectious diseases.

About ZERBAXA

ZERBAXA (ceftolozane and tazobactam) is an antibacterial combination product for intravenous infusion consisting of the cephalosporin antibacterial drug ceftolozane sulfate and the beta-lactamase inhibitor tazobactam sodium.

ZERBAXA is approved in the United States and is indicated in adult patients for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including pyelonephritis, caused by the following Gram-negative microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ZERBAXA used in combination with metronidazole is indicated in adult patients for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) caused by the following Gram-negative and Gram-positive microorganisms: Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus salivarius.

To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of ZERBAXA and other antibacterial drugs, ZERBAXA should be used only to treat infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.

Important Safety Information about ZERBAXA

Patients with renal impairment: Decreased efficacy of ZERBAXA has been observed in patients with baseline CrCl of 30 to ≤50 mL/min. In a clinical trial, patients with cIAIs with CrCl ≥50 mL/min had a clinical cure rate of 85.2% when treated with ZERBAXA plus metronidazole vs 87.9% when treated with meropenem. In the same trial, patients with CrCl 30 to ≤50 mL/min had a clinical cure rate of 47.8% when treated with ZERBAXA plus metronidazole vs 69.2% when treated with meropenem. A similar trend was also seen in the cUTI trial. Monitor CrCl at least daily in patients with changing renal function and adjust the dose of ZERBAXA (ceftolozane and tazobactam) accordingly.

Hypersensitivity: ZERBAXA is contraindicated in patients with known serious hypersensitivity to ceftolozane/tazobactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, or other members of the beta-lactam class. Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactic) reactions have been reported in patients receiving beta-lactam antibacterials. Before initiating therapy with ZERBAXA, make careful inquiry about previous hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins, penicillins, or other beta-lactams. If an anaphylactic reaction to ZERBAXA occurs, discontinue use and institute appropriate therapy.

Clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea (CDAD), ranging from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis, has been reported with nearly all systemic antibacterial agents, including ZERBAXA. Careful medical history is necessary because CDAD has been reported to occur more than two months after the administration of antibacterial agents. If CDAD is confirmed, antibacterial use not directed against C. difficile should be discontinued, if possible.

Development of drug-resistant bacteria: Prescribing ZERBAXA in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

Adverse reactions: The most common adverse reactions occurring in ≥5% of patients were headache (5.8%) in the cUTI trial, and nausea (7.9%), diarrhea (6.2%) and pyrexia (5.6%) in the cIAI trial.

About Merck

For 125 years, Merck has been a global health care leader working to help the world be well. Merck is known as MSD outside the United States and Canada. Through our prescription medicines, vaccines, biologic therapies, and animal health products, we work with customers and operate in more than 140 countries to deliver innovative health solutions. We also demonstrate our commitment to increasing access to health care through far-reaching policies, programs and partnerships. For more information, visit www.merck.com and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn.

Forward-Looking Statement of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, N.J., USA

This news release of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, N.J., USA (the “company”) includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the company’s management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. There can be no guarantees with respect to pipeline products that the products will receive the necessary regulatory approvals or that they will prove to be commercially successful. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results may differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.

Risks and uncertainties include but are not limited to, general industry conditions and competition; general economic factors, including interest rate and currency exchange rate fluctuations; the impact of pharmaceutical industry regulation and health care legislation in the United States and internationally; global trends toward health care cost containment; technological advances, new products and patents attained by competitors; challenges inherent in new product development, including obtaining regulatory approval; the company’s ability to accurately predict future market conditions; manufacturing difficulties or delays; financial instability of international economies and sovereign risk; dependence on the effectiveness of the company’s patents and other protections for innovative products; and the exposure to litigation, including patent litigation, and/or regulatory actions.

The company undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Additional factors that could cause results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements can be found in the company’s 2015 Annual Report on Form 10-K and the company’s other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) available at the SEC’s Internet site (www.sec.gov).

Please see Prescribing Information for ZERBAXA (ceftolozane and tazobactam) at http://zerbaxa.com/pdf/PrescribingInformation.pdf.

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse this product or any product and this posting is strictly for informational purposes only.

Summit Therapeutics To Present Further Data Showing Superiority Of Its New Antibiotic At the 26th ECCMID Conference

summit

 

 

Summit Therapeutics is to present further data showing the superiority of its new antibiotic for hospital superbug C.diff. over the standard of care medicine.

The additional data on Summit’s ridinilazole versus vancomycin comes from the from the Phase 2 CoDIFy trial and will be heard at the 26th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Conference  (ECCMID).

(ECCMID 2016  Will be hosted in Amsterdam from 9 – 12 April )

Taking the antibiotic ridinilazole resulted in a marked reduction in rates of C. diff. (CDI) recurrence as compared to vancomycin (14.3% versus 34.8%) the drug discovery firm will say.

This result comes on top of t previously reported statistical superiority in ‘sustained clinical response’ rates of ridinilazole over vancomycin (66.7% compared to 42.4%) for treating the disease.

Sustained clinical response is defined as clinical cure at the end of treatment and no recurrence of the condition in 30 days after therapy.

C. diff is a serious threat in hospitals and care homes and there are between 450000 and 700000 cases in the US annually.

Recurrence is a key problem as repeat episodes are typically more severe and associated with an increase in mortality rates and healthcare costs.

 

 

To read the total article, click on the following link:

http://www.menafn.com/1094678222/Summit-Therapeutics-to-present-further-data-showing-ridinilazoles-superiority

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse this product or any product and this posting is strictly for informational purposes only.