Category Archives: C.diff. for Patients

Dale Gerding, MD, FACP, FIDSA, FSHEA To Chair the July 16, 2021 C. diff. Patient, Family, and Caregiver Live-Online Symposium

Scientific Advisor Prof Dale Gerding to chair C. diff. Foundation

C. diff. Patient, Family, and Caregiver Symposium

July 16th  – Live-Online beginning at 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EDT 

Register Today!

 

 

 

 

Brighton, United Kingdom – 02 July 2021 – Destiny Pharma plc (AIM: DEST), a clinical stage innovative biotechnology company focused on the development of novel medicines to prevent life-threatening infections, is pleased to announce that its Scientific Advisory Board member, Professor Dale Gerding, a world-leading expert in C. difficile infections (CDI) and the discoverer of NTCD-M3, will be chairing the “C. diff. Patient, Family, and Caregiver” Symposium, to be held virtually on 16 July 2021.

The Symposium, hosted by the C Diff Foundation, will be a gathering of healthcare professionals, practitioners, thought leaders, and C. diff. survivors focused on transforming the patient experience of people living with C. diff. infections worldwide.

Distinguished members and keynote speakers will provide insight on how to identify, evaluate, and prioritize innovations that can quickly touch the lives of patients battling C. diff. infections.

Destiny Pharma’s late-stage asset, NTCD-M3, is a novel microbiome therapeutic being developed to reduce the recurrence of C. diff. infections in the gut. CDI is the leading cause of hospital acquired infection in the US and current treatments lead to significant recurrence. In the US, there are approximately 500,000 cases of CDI each year; many of these initial cases then recur leading to 29,000 deaths per year.

NTCD-M3 has the potential to become the leading treatment for CDI, as it has shown to deliver clear advantages to both existing CDI treatment options and also to those currently in clinical development.

About Destiny Pharma plc
Destiny Pharma is a UK based, clinical stage, innovative biotechnology company focused on the development of novel medicines that can prevent life-threatening infections. Its pipeline has novel microbiome-based biotherapeutics and XF drug clinical assets including NTCD-M3, a Phase 3 ready treatment for the prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI) recurrence, which is the leading cause of hospital acquired infection in the US and also XF-73 nasal gel, which has recently completed a positive Phase 2b clinical trial targeting the prevention of post-surgical staphylococcal hospital infections including MRSA. It is also co-developing SPOR-COV, a novel, biotherapeutic product for the prevention of COVID-19 and other viral respiratory infections, and has earlier grant funded XF research projects. 

Patient, Family, Caregiver January Symposium Broadcasts During March On C. diff. Spores and More Live Program

CDIFFRADIO.COM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATES to listen in to the leading topic expert presentations

shared on January 15, 2021, at the Patient, Family, Caregiver Symposium:

Beginning Tuesday, March 9 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST following through on

March 16,  March 23, and  March 30.

A Symposium specifically developed for Patients Diagnosed With a C. diff. Infection, Being Treated For a Clostridioides diffiicile infection, Recovering From a Clostridioides difficile Infection and Recurrences with Family Members and Caregivers.

The Patient & Family C. diff. Symposium was a gathering of healthcare professionals, keynote speakers, health advocates, practitioners, educators, thought leaders, and patients who are transforming the patient experience and changing the way people experience
C. diff. infections worldwide.

Unlike other conferences on this topic, patients will share their C. diff. infection journeys, providing a real-world perspective on patient experience. Our attendees will learn more from this virtual-online symposium and gain knowledge on important topics that will better aid their care and recovery through tools and strategies delivered by keynote speakers.  

The Symposium followed the C Diff Foundation Mission statement –   Educating and Advocating for the prevention, treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, and environmental safety of Clostridioides difficile
(C. diff.) infections worldwide.

Keynote speakers presented up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and provide important information focused on, yet not limited to,  a Clostridioides difficile infection (also known as C. diff., C. difficile, CDAD, CDI) ……

  • Prevention
  • Treatments
  • Diagnostics
  • Research
  • Environmental Safety
  • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Introduction to Microbiome Research and Studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
  • Antibiotic Stewardship

We hope you enjoy the broadcasts!

 

Program Chair:  Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG

Barbara McGovern, MD     “Treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection with                                                                                        SER-109, an investigational microbiome drug.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD          ” C. diff. Overview – What is a C. diff. Infection?”

Sahil Khanna, MD               “C. diff. Treatments + FMT Overview. “

 

 

 

Simon Cutting, Ph. D.         “Bacillus, and C. diff.  Spore Overview. “

Teena Chopra, MD                ” Introduction to Infection Prevention.”

Doe Kley, RN, MPH              “C. diff. Transitioning from Hospital to Home. “

Courtney Jones                    ” Microbiome, Microbiota, and Gut Health.”

Denise Cardo, MD                “Everyone Has a Role in Antibiotic Awareness.”

Larry Kociolek, MD              “C. diff. Infections in Pediatrics.”

Kathy Bischoff                        “My C. diff.  Journey.”

Renata Johnson                      “My C. diff. Journey.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD      &    Barbara McGovern, MD

 

This Symposium was hosted by the C Diff Foundation and

Sponsored by Seres Therapeutics  

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast Enters Season VI

Welcome to Season VI on 

C. diff. Spores and More

Live Broadcast, sponsored

by Clorox Healthcare.

 

With over 260 archived episodes ~ Listen At Your Leisure


It’s a new year with an entirely new line up of guests eager to share their C. difficile research, infection prevention methods, clinical trials in progress, the updates in the C. diff. community, and much more.

 

 

 

 

In March the post-Patient and Family Symposium presentations will broadcast, in the event you weren’t able to attend the live-online event hosted on January 15th. The first annual Patient and Family Symposium was sponsored by Seres Therapeutics

Do you have a specific topic of interest or would like to learn more about a specific product or procedure?  Send an email to info@cdifffoundation.org and share your suggestions and interests.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

Join us every Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. EST for the Live Broadcast  www.cdiffradio.com

 

Study Finds C. difficile (CDI) Has the Potential Role of Transmission In Home Environment

 

 

 

 

Findings from a study by researchers from the University of Iowa highlights the potential role of the home environment in Clostridioides difficile transmission.

Using data from a commercial insurance claims database, the researchers found that the incidence of C difficile infection (CDI) among individuals living with a family member who had CDI was more than 12 times greater than the incidence in those without prior family exposure. The incidence rate was even higher in certain groups less likely to have other risk-increasing exposures.

The results of the study appeared Jun 26 in JAMA Open Network.

While the level of absolute CDI risk attributable to the household transmission was extremely low, the authors of the study say the findings may have practical implications for preventing the spread of CDI in households.

CDI can be spread in the community

C. difficile infection (CDI)  is a common, typically hospital-acquired infection that is mainly associated with antibiotic use and healthcare settings. While antibiotics create the conditions that allow for C difficile to flourish in the gut and cause infection, spores shed by infected patients (through fecal matter) and can be spread by healthcare workers and are frequently found on *bed rails, in the patient bathrooms, and other parts of the hospital environment.

(*High touch areas can be easily contaminated with Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile, C. diff.) spores) cdf note.

Those spores are often difficult to eliminate because they are resistant to many cleaning agents.

In 2017, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were an estimated 223,900 CDI cases in hospitalized patients.

But not all CDI cases start in hospitals. Some studies have found that CDI can be transmitted outside of healthcare settings, with persistent contamination of the household environment occurring in patients with documented infection. Others have found household pets colonized with the bacterium.

To better understand the potential role of household C difficile transmission, the University of Iowa researchers used a large population-based, commercial insurance claims data set to examine whether family members of CDI patients had a greater risk of acquiring the infection. Limiting the analysis to households with two or more family member enrolled in the same insurance plan for an entire month, they grouped individuals into four categories based on CDI status and family exposure to CDI: (1) CDI and prior family exposure, (2) no CDI and prior family exposure, (3) CDI and no family exposure, and (4) no CDI and no family exposure.

The primary outcome of the case-control study was the incidence of CDI in a given monthly enrollment stratum. Aside from exposure to CDI diagnosed in a family member, other CDI exposure risks were considered, including prior hospitalization, age, and antibiotic use. The researchers also conducted a separate analysis for CDI diagnosed in hospital or outpatient settings.

Higher risk from family exposure

Analysis of data covering 2001 through 2017 found that 224,818 CDI cases, representing 194,424 enrollees, occurred in families with at least two enrollees. Of these, 1,074 CDI cases (0.48%) occurred following a diagnosis in a separate family member, representing possible transmission. In general, the index cases of CDI tended to occur in older enrollees (ages 45 to 64 years), while the CDI cases that represented potential transmission events occurred in children.

A comparison of the incidence rate ratio (IRR) between individuals with and without family exposure showed that prior family exposure was significantly associated with an increased incidence of CDI (IRR, 12.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.86 to 16.97) even after controlling for other risk factors. This was the second-highest IRR behind hospital exposure (IRR, 16.18; 95% CI, 15.31 to 17.10).

Increased CDI incidence was also associated with age (IRR, 9.90; 95% CI, 8.93 to 10.98 for people over age 65 compared with those aged 0 to 17) and antibiotic use (IRR, 7.78; 95% CI, 7.33 to 8.25 for people on high-CDI-risk antibiotics compared with no antibiotics).

When the researchers looked at subgroups of CDI cases less likely to be attributed to hospital exposure, they found that the IRR associated with family exposure was even higher—16.00 (95% CI, 11.72 to 21.22) for community-onset CDI and 21.74 (95% CI, 15.12 to 30.01) for community-onset CDI without prior hospitalization.

“For individuals with family exposure, the risk for being diagnosed with CDI remained consistent after controlling for CDI risk factors and different model specifications,” the authors wrote. “Together, these results suggest that individuals with family exposure may be at greater risk for acquiring CDI than those without exposure and highlight the importance of the shared environment in the transmission and acquisition of C difficile.”

The authors note that because they were not able to conduct whole-genome sequencing, they cannot confirm whether CDI cases within families represent identical strains. They also said the study is limited by the reliance on insurance claims data, which do not provide all the details necessary to determine attributable risk.

Despite the low absolute risk of acquiring CDI from a family member, the authors suggested that cleaning shared bathrooms with effective cleaning agents could be a practical way to minimize transmission risk.

To view the article in its entirety, please click on the following link to be redirected. Thank you.

https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2020/06/study-suggests-household-exposure-may-increase-c-difficile-risk

C. difficile Infection (C. diff.); A Survivor’s Perspective with CDI Introduction by Teena Chopra, MD,MPH,FACP,FIDSA,FSHEA

Join us on Tuesday, May 26th at 1:00 p.m. EST

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast

www.cdiffradio.com

With Doctor Teena Chopra, MD,MPH,FACP,FIDSA,FSHEA
Associate Professor of Medicine,Division of Infectious Diseases,
Corporate Medical Director,Infection Prevention,Epidemiology,and Antibiotic Stewardship ,DMC and WSU Director,Infection Prevention,Epidemiology and Antibiotic Stewardship,Vibra Hospital

Dr. Chopra will lead the discussion with an overview of a C. difficile infection followed by Alba Muhlfeld, and Renata Johnson, C. diff. Survivors both sharing their journey and providing
key-points to our global listeners.

Unable to listen to the live broadcast?

Access the C. diff. Spores and More Library
http://www.cdiffradio.com
and listen at your leisure.

 

 

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