Tag Archives: Infection control

Medical Mattresses; Healthcare-acquired Infections and How Hospital Bedding Is Involved

Our guests Dr. Edmond Hooker, MD with Bruce Rippe, CEO of Trinity Guardion and  J. Darrel Hicks, BA, Master REH, CHESP joined us on C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network live broadcast –August 1st  to  discuss Healthcare – associated Infections (HAIs ) and how they lead to more than 720,000 illnesses and 75,000 deaths a year. In fact, more people die from HAIs each year than from automobile accidents. Furthermore, HAIs are a huge financial burden, adding $30 billion to annual healthcare costs. The American-made Trinity Patient Protection System gives hospitals the solution they need to reduce and eliminate HAIs.

Launderable, reusable, cost-effective and eco-friendly, the Trinity System’s fluid-proof covers fit around beds, pillows, stretchers and physical therapy tables. Unlike typical disinfectant agents designed for hard surfaces, the Trinity System keeps bacteria off the porous surface of the mattress, as well as, the bed deck. When laundered to CDC standards, the Trinity System removes 99.99% of bacteria and has been proven to reduce C. diff infection rates by about 50%.

 

www.trinityguardion.com

 

To learn more, from these leading topic-experts, about Medical Mattress Contamination and how bedding is involved in healthcare-associated infections.

Listen to the podcast available and part of the C.diff. Spores and More living library.

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/100501/healthcare-acquired-infections-and-how-hospital-bedding-is-involved

Hand Washing aka Hand Hygiene While On a Journey

washhands2

“Spring Break” is upon us and it’s the perfect time for a road-trip!

 

Traveling is one of the most important times to pay close attention to “infection prevention.”

Being prepared can help.

During a recent journey along the east coast, in the USA, a few of the Foundation members had the opportunity to visit an array of public restrooms along the way.

As we are aware, public restrooms can be a challenge and a real eye-opening experience. Many of the facilities fell short in monitoring their supplies along with the monitoring of over-all cleanliness of their restroom.

During the road trip, along various interstates, back roads, and local towns, we began to assess the establishment’s public facilities based on the following criteria:

* Cleanliness.

* Supplies offered.

* Electronic hand drying devices vs traditional supplies.

* Cleaning/Room monitoring log.

As the journey continued the restroom grading system became the topic of conversation discussing the vast ways establishments can maintain a safe, clean, and friendly environment for their visitors.  There were also discussions on how a traveler can be prepared by carrying supplies to ensure their own safety when utilizing public facilities.

The following is a list of a few supplies easily kept in a small bag during travel times:

* A small container of liquid soap (preferably one without the anti-bacterial ingredients).

* A few paper towels dampened with bleach or pack a EPA Registered cleaning product to clean the commode and high-touch areas.  It is good safety practice to store the paper towels in a sealed plastic container.  Other cleaning (Germicidal/Disinfectant) product wipes should remain in their original container or sealed separately in a plastic container.   Never mix two cleaning wipes/products together or store in the same container.

* Sheets of T.P. or a small roll.

* Sheets of dry paper towels to turn off water faucets and dry hands.

*  Attempt to open the restroom door with an elbow or use a dry paper towel to pull the door handle open in order to keep hands clean and not re-introduce germs onto the hands.

Was there a favorite rest stop/establishment along the way?  Yes.

McDonalds restrooms were found to be acceptable and met the needs of the travelers. Their establishments focus on cleanliness, offered an adequate supply of soap with automated towel dispenser or hand dryers, and facility monitoring logs in place. Their organization also displayed signs over the sinks promoting hand hygiene, a public safety announcement for both staff, and visitors.

The public restrooms at rest-stops along I-95 were impressive with their focus on cleanliness, adequately filled soap containers, and hand dryers available in each restroom with the elimination of a main door to enter/exit the facility.  Once the hands are washed/dried the reintroduction to harmful germs upon exiting the public area from a door handle is eliminated.

There were a number of unacceptable facilities located in local discount stores, some food stores, food chain eateries, and quick-mart stations.  Their sinks were not automated with motion sensors and many with two handles, empty paper towel dispensers and automatic hand drying equipment unavailable. Many restrooms were without cleaning monitoring logs promoting safety and cleanliness to the staff (food handlers), and visitors alike.

We appreciate the availability and use of public restrooms during  long commutes, when on vacations, and time away from home.  Most establishments offer adequate supplies to eliminate, and  prevent the spread of harmful germs, however;  it is always best to be prepared.  The next time a journey is planned, do not forget to pack the supplies needed for a public restroom visit that will keep you and your family safe.

The journey and hand-washing experiences become part of the adventure.  Take the opportunity to report negative experiences to the management and help change a negative into a positive for the next person visiting.

Remember to take that twenty second hand-washing break before exiting a restroom, before/after eating, before/after entering a patient’s room, after changing diapers, before/after handling food, and during the day.   Let’s stop giving germs a free ride.

Here’s to everyone’s good health!

Below you will find links available for Public Restroom locators offered by Charmin, one app for an iPhone, and an app for an Android Phone. 

http://www.charmin.com/find-public-restrooms.aspx?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Charmin_Search_Desktop_Lifestyle_SoS+App&utm_term=restroom%20app&utm_content=SvExifYv_restroom%20app_p_2095916800&sctp=ppc&scvn=bing&scsrc=bing_search&sckw=na

* App For iPhone

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/restroom-bathroom-toilet-finder/id311896604?mt=8

* App For Android

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bto.toilet

Healthcare Disinfecting Cell PhoneSoap System

PHONESOAP_CELL_PHONE_CHARGER_UV_SANITIZER_003Cell Phone Soap

Click on the link below to be directed to the PhoneSoap website and learn more about this Cell Phone Disinfecting System Available:

https://www.phonesoap.com/product/healthcare-sanitizing-and-disinfecting/

 

 

PhoneSoap’s UV products are used in hospitals throughout the country

 

UV-C light is already being used in hospitals and clean rooms throughout the world because it has been proven to effectively penetrate and disarm bacteria. The light will sanitize any surface it touches. PhoneSoap has adapted this technology to be portable and accessible to the average health care provider.

 

Hand-washing (aka hand-hygiene) Helps Stop The Spread Of Germs

HAVE YOU TAKEN A 20 – 30 SECOND HAND-WASHING BREAK?

Correct hand-washing technique keeps you and others safe:

 

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them

WHEN TO WASH YOUR HANDS:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after patient care in any setting
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet and before exiting the restroom
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage
  • After visiting an outpatient setting (Physicians office/Dentist office/Clinic)
  • After shopping
  • Before and after handling food
  • After traveling on public transportation
  • Any any time hands are soiled

 

What is the difference?
Hand hygiene . A general term that applies to either
handwashing, antiseptic handwash, antiseptic hand rub, or
surgical hand antisepsis.
Handwashing . Washing hands with plain (i.e., non-antimi-
crobial) soap and water.
Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings
Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices
Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA
Hand Hygiene Task Force
Vol. 51 / RR-16
Activity of Antiseptic Agents Against
Spore-Forming Bacteria
The widespread prevalence of health-care–associated diarrhea                                                            caused by Clostridium difficile and the recent occurrence
in the United States of human Bacillus anthracis infections                                                                    associated with contaminated items sent through the postal
system has raised concern regarding the activity of antiseptic
agents against spore-forming bacteria. None of the agents
(including alcohols, chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene,
iodophors, PCMX, and triclosan) used in antiseptic handwash
or antiseptic hand-rub preparations are reliably sporicidal
against Clostridium spp. or Bacillus spp. (120,172,224,225).
Washing hands with non-antimicrobial or antimicrobial soap
and water may help to physically remove spores from the sur-
face of contaminated hands. HCWs should be encouraged
to wear gloves when caring for patients with
C. difficile – associated diarrhea (226). After gloves are removed, hands
should be washed with a non-antimicrobial or an antimicro-
bial soap and water or disinfected with an alcohol-based hand
rub. During outbreaks of C. difficile-related infections, washing                                                              hands with a non-antimicrobial or antimicrobial soap and
water after removing gloves is prudent. HCWs with suspected
or documented exposure to B. anthracis-contaminated items also should be encouraged to wash their hands with a non-antimicrobial or antimicrobial soap and water
cdiffhandwashingbreakposter

Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet (PX-UV) Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms

“Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet (PX-UV) Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms”

A study conducted by Dr. Curtis Donskey, and a team of researchers with the objective to determine the effectiveness of pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection device for reduction in recovery of healthcare-associated pathogens was recently published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology (ICHE).

Michelle M. Nerandzica1 c1, Priyaleela Thotaa2, Thriveen Sankar C.a2, Annette Jencsona1, Jennifer L. Cadnuma2, Amy J. Raya2a3, Robert A. Salataa2a3, Richard R. Watkinsa4 and Curtis J. Donskeya2a3a5

a1 Research Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

a2 Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio

a3 Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

a4 Akron General Medical Center, Akron, Ohio

a5 Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of a pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection device for reduction in recovery of healthcare-associated pathogens.

SETTING Two acute-care hospitals.

METHODS We examined the effectiveness of PX-UV for killing of Clostridium difficile spores, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) on glass carriers and evaluated the impact of pathogen concentration, distance from the device, organic load, and shading from the direct field of radiation on killing efficacy. We compared the effectiveness of PX-UV and ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation, each delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet. In hospital rooms, the frequency of native pathogen contamination on high-touch surfaces was assessed before and after 10 minutes of PX-UV irradiation.

RESULTS On carriers, irradiation delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet from the PX-UV device reduced recovery of C. difficile spores, MRSA, and VRE by 0.55±0.34, 1.85±0.49, and 0.6±0.25 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm2, respectively. Increasing distance from the PX-UV device dramatically reduced killing efficacy, whereas pathogen concentration, organic load, and shading did not. Continuous UV-C achieved significantly greater log10CFU reductions than PX-UV irradiation on glass carriers. On frequently touched surfaces, PX-UV significantly reduced the frequency of positive C. difficile, VRE, and MRSA culture results.

CONCLUSIONS The PX-UV device reduced recovery of MRSA, C. difficile, and VRE on glass carriers and on frequently touched surfaces in hospital rooms with a 10-minute UV exposure time. PX-UV was not more effective than continuous UV-C in reducing pathogen recovery on glass slides, suggesting that both forms of UV have some effectiveness at relatively short exposure times.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014;00(0): 1–6

(Received July 11 2014)

(Accepted October 14 2014)

To access the report in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2014.36

C. difficile Infection: EUCLID Study Reveals >39K Cases May Be Missed Yearly

* IN THE NEWS:  12 MAY 2014  *

 

EUCLID Study Reveals More Than 39,000 Cases of Clostridium difficile Infection  May Be Missed Each Year

 

Clostridium difficile is the major cause of infective, hospital-acquired diarrhoea in the developed world1

BARCELONA, SPAIN, 12 MAY 2014, PRNewswire/- The full set of data from EUCLID, the largest ever prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) across Europe, were presented today at the 24th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). Data from 482 European hospitals reveal that in a single day, an average of 109 cases of CDI are missed due to a lack of clinical suspicion or inadequate laboratory testing, potentially leading to more than 39,000 missed cases in Europe each year.2

The study results show that incidence of CDI in Europe has increased (compared with previous studies) from 4.123 to 7.92 cases per 10,000 patient bed days between 2008 and 2012-13, respectively. Furthermore, the new data highlight that CDI PCR-ribotype 027, one of the most virulent PCR-ribotypes associated with CDI epidemics,4 is the most common in Europe.5 Countries with the highest rates of CDI testing had the lowest rates of this epidemic C. difficile strain.5

“Countries with increased awareness of CDI have probably been able to reduce outbreaks associated with the most virulent C. difficile strains by improving the early diagnosis of this usually healthcare associated infection” said Professor Mark Wilcox, Professor of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals & University of Leeds. “This study highlights that it is essential that we improve the implementation of CDI testing in hospitals, in order to tackle the issue of the increasing incidence of CDI across Europe.”

The EUropean multi-centre, prospective bi-annual point prevalence study of CLostridium difficile Infection in hospitalised patients with Diarrhoea (EUCLID) involved 482 hospitals from 20 European countries.

These full results compare data captured on two separate days, one in winter 2012/13 and one in summer 2013. On each of the assigned days, participating hospitals submitted all received unformed faecal samples to the respective EUCLID National Coordinating laboratories (NCLs). In total, 7,181 faecal samples were submitted by participating hospitals.2

Results of this study highlight marked recent shifts in CDI testing policy and methodology across Europe, resulting in improved testing policies and selection of laboratory methods.2 The data show that false-positive rates decreased between the two study days in those countries where testing procedures and methods had improved.2 Despite this, more than 50% of hospitals are still not using the most accurate testing procedure for CDI and more than one in five (21.8%) samples found to be positive for CDI at the NCL had not been tested at the local hospital level.2 In addition, the findings reveal that over half (52.1%) of hospitals in Europe only test for CDI at a physician’s request.2

“Guidelines recommend that hospitals test for CDI on all unformed stools when the cause of diarrhoea is not clear. However we are still seeing an issue with both a lack of clinical suspicion and lack of testing for CDI”, commented Professor Mark Wilcox. “CDI is a condition which causes considerable suffering for patients and a huge economic burden to hospitals across Europe. These results reveal that there is still more to be done in order to optimise CDI management and prevention.”

The EUCLID study is being coordinated out of the University of Leeds, UK, by Professor Mark Wilcox’s research group, with support from the EUCLID Core Group. The study was initiated and financially supported by Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd.

About Clostridium difficile Infection

CDI is a serious illness resulting from infection of the internal lining of the colon by C. difficile bacteria. The bacteria produce toxins that cause inflammation of the colon, diarrhoea and, in some cases, death.6 Patients typically develop CDI after the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics that disrupt normal bowel flora, allowing C. difficile bacteria to flourish.7 CDI is the leading cause of hospital acquired (nosocomial) diarrhoea in industrialised countries8 and the risk of CDI and disease recurrence is particularly high in patients aged 65 years and older.9 Recurrence of CDI occurs in up to 25% of patients within 30 days of initial treatment with current therapies.10,11,12 The ESCMID has identified recurrence as being the most important problem in the treatment of CDI.13

About Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd.

Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd., located in the UK, is the European Headquarters of Tokyo-based Astellas Pharma Inc. Astellas is a pharmaceutical company dedicated to improving the health of people around the world through the provision of innovative and reliable pharmaceuticals. As a global company, Astellas is committed to combining outstanding research and development (R&D) and marketing capabilities to continue to grow in the world pharmaceutical market. Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd. manages 21 affiliate offices located across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. In addition, the Company has an R&D site and three manufacturing plants in Europe. The company employs approximately 4,300 staff across these regions. For more information about Astellas Pharma Europe, please visit http://www.astellas.eu.

References

  1. Ananthakrishnan AN. Clostridium difficile infection: epidemiology, risk factors and management. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 2011;8:17-26.
  2. Davies KA, et al. Second report from the EUropean, multi-centre, prospective bi-annual point prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with Diarrhoea (EUCLID) PO753. Presented at ECCMID 2014.
  3. Bauer MP et al. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital-based survey. Lancet 2011; 377:63-73.
  4. Kuijper EJ, Coignard B, Tull P. Emergence of Clostridium difficile-associated disease in North America and Europe. Clin Microbiol Infect 2006;12 suppl 6:2–18.
  5. Davies KA. Increased diversity of C. difficile PCR-ribotypes across European countries and disparity of 027 prevalence; results of a European prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection (EUCLID). Presented at ECCMID 2014.
  6. Poutanen SM, et al. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in adults. CMAJ 2004;171:51–8.
  7. Kelly CP, et al. Clostridium difficile infection. Ann Rev Med 1998;49:375–390.
  8. Crobach MJ, et al. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID): Data review and recommendations for diagnosing Clostridium difficile-infection (CDI). Clin Micro Infect 2009;15:1053–1066.
  9. Pepin J, et al. Increasing risk of relapse after treatment of Clostridium difficile colitis in Quebec, Canada. Clin Infect Dis 2005;40:1591–7.
  10. Bouza E, et al. Results of a phase III trial comparing tolevamer, vancomycin and metronidazole in patients with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea. Clin Micro Infect 2008;14(suppl 7):S103-4.
  11. Lowy I, et al. Treatment with Monoclonal Antibodies against Clostridium difficile Toxins. N Engl J Med 2010;362;3:197-205.
  12. Louie TJ, et al. Fidaxomicin versus vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infection. N Engl J Med 2011;364:422–31.
  13. Bauer MP, et al. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ESCMID): treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile-infection (CDI). Clin Micro Infect 2009;15: 1067-79.

The EUCLID study is being coordinated out of the University of Leeds, UK, by Professor Mark Wilcox’s research group, with support from the EUCLID Core Group. The study was initiated and financially supported by Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd.

FDX/14/0017/EUf
Date of Prep: May 2014

Hand Washing aka Hand Hygiene While On a Journey

washhands2

During a recent journey along the east coast, in the USA, a few of the Foundation members had the opportunity to visit an array of public restrooms along the way.

As we are aware, public restrooms can be a challenge and a real eye-opening experience. Many of the facilities fell short in monitoring their supplies along with the monitoring of over-all cleanliness of their restroom.

During the road trip, along various interstates, back roads, and local towns, we began to assess the establishment’s public facilities based on the following criteria:

* Cleanliness.

* Supplies offered.

* Electronic hand drying devices vs traditional supplies.

* Cleaning/Room monitoring log.

As the journey continued the restroom grading system became the topic of conversation discussing the vast ways establishments can maintain a safe, clean, and friendly environment for their visitors.  There were also discussions on how a traveler can be prepared by carrying supplies to ensure their own safety when utilizing public facilities.

The following is a list of a few supplies easily kept in a small bag during travel times:

* A small container of liquid soap (preferably one without the anti-bacterial ingredients).

* A few paper towels dampened with bleach or pack a EPA Registered cleaning product to clean the commode and high-touch areas.  It is good safety practice to store the paper towels in a sealed plastic container.  Other cleaning (Germicidal/Disinfectant) product wipes should remain in their original container or sealed separately in a plastic container.   Never mix two cleaning wipes/products together or store in the same container.

* Sheets of T.P. or a small roll.

* Sheets of dry paper towels to turn off water faucets and dry hands.

*  Attempt to open the restroom door with an elbow or use a dry paper towel to pull the door handle open in order to keep hands clean and not re-introduce germs onto the hands.

Was there a favorite rest stop/establishment along the way?  Yes.

McDonalds restrooms were found to be acceptable and met the needs of the travelers. Their establishments focus on cleanliness, offered an adequate supply of soap with automated towel dispenser or hand dryers, and facility monitoring logs in place. Their organization also displayed signs over the sinks promoting hand hygiene, a public safety announcement for both staff, and visitors.

The public restrooms at rest-stops along I-95 were impressive with their focus on cleanliness, adequately filled soap containers, and hand dryers available in each restroom with the elimination of a main door to enter/exit the facility.  Once the hands are washed/dried the reintroduction to harmful germs upon exiting the public area from a door handle is eliminated.

There were a number of unacceptable facilities located in local discount stores, some food stores, food chain eateries, and quick-mart stations.  Their sinks were not automated with motion sensors and many with two handles, empty paper towel dispensers and automatic hand drying equipment unavailable. Many restrooms were without cleaning monitoring logs promoting safety and cleanliness to the staff (food handlers), and visitors alike.

We appreciate the availability and use of public restrooms during  long commutes, when on vacations, and time away from home.  Most establishments offer adequate supplies to eliminate, and  prevent the spread of harmful germs, however;  it is always best to be prepared.  The next time a journey is planned, do not forget to pack the supplies needed for a public restroom visit that will keep you and your family safe.

The journey and hand-washing experiences become part of the adventure.  Take the opportunity to report negative experiences to the management and help change a negative into a positive for the next person visiting.

Remember to take that twenty second hand-washing break before exiting a restroom, before/after eating, before/after entering a patient’s room, after changing diapers, before/after handling food, and during the day.   Let’s stop giving germs a free ride.

Here’s to everyone’s good health!

Below you will find links available for Public Restroom locators offered by Charmin, one app for an iPhone, and an app for an Android Phone. 

http://www.charmin.com/find-public-restrooms.aspx?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Charmin_Search_Desktop_Lifestyle_SoS+App&utm_term=restroom%20app&utm_content=SvExifYv_restroom%20app_p_2095916800&sctp=ppc&scvn=bing&scsrc=bing_search&sckw=na

* App For iPhone

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/restroom-bathroom-toilet-finder/id311896604?mt=8

* App For Android

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bto.toilet