Tag Archives: cre

Antibiotic Resistance IS A Serious Global Health Concern

C.diff. Treatments

A Nevada woman has died from an infection resistant to all available antibiotics in the United States, public health officials report.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the woman’s condition was deemed incurable after being tested against 26 different antibiotics.

Though this isn’t the first case of pan-resistant bacteria in the U.S., at this time it is still uncommon. Still, experts note that antibiotic resistance is a growing health concern globally and call the newly reported case “a wake up call.”

“This is the latest reminder that yes, antibiotic resistance is real,” Dr. James Johnson, a professor specializing in infectious diseases at the University of Minnesota Medical School, told CBS News. “This is not some future, fantasized armageddon threat that maybe will happen after our lifetime. This is now, it’s real, and it’s here.”

According to the report, the woman from Washoe County was in her 70s and had recently returned to America after an extended trip to India. She had been hospitalized there several times before being admitted to an acute care hospital in Nevada in mid-August.

Doctors discovered the woman was infected with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), which is a family of germs that CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden has called “nightmare bacteria” due to the danger it poses for spreading antibiotic resistance.

The woman had a specific type of CRE, called Klebsiella pneumoniae, which can lead to a number of illnesses, including pneumonia, blood stream infections, and meningitis. In early September, she developed septic shock and died.

The authors of the report say the case highlights the need for doctors and hospitals to ask incoming patients about recent travel and if they have been hospitalized elsewhere.

Other experts say it underscores the need for the medical community, the government and the public to take antibiotic resistance more seriously.

According to the CDC, at least two million people become infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria each year, and at least 23,000 die as a direct result of these infections.

The World Health Organization calls antibiotic resistance “one of the biggest threats to global health.”

A grim report released last year suggests that if bacteria keep evolving at the current rate, by 2050, superbugs will kill 10 million people a year.

While scientists are working to develop new antibiotics, that takes time, and experts encourage doctors and the public to focus on prevention efforts.

One of the most important ways to prevent antibiotic resistance is to only take antibiotics only when they’re necessary.

“Drug resistance like this [case] generally develops from too much exposure to antibiotics,” assistant professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, told CBS News. “Every time you’re placed on an antibiotic it’s important to question if it’s absolutely necessary and what’s the shortest amount of time you can take this antibiotic for it to still be effective.”

Johnson notes that medical tourism – the practice of traveling to another country to obtain medical treatment, typically at lower cost – may no longer be worth the risk. “With this [antibiotic] resistance issue, the risk/benefit of this approach really changes and I think that people really need to be aware and seriously consider if it’s a good idea given the possibility of this kind of thing,” he said.

Frequent hand washing, particularly in healthcare settings, is also extremely important in preventing the spread of germs.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected:

http://www.lasvegasnow.com/news/nevada-woman-died-from-superbug-resistant-to-all-available-antibiotics-in-us/640548775

Facilities Work Together To Protect Patients and Reduce Spreading Infection

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What can be done?

In the case of C diff and CRE a multipronged intervention approach is necessary. The federal government needs to track outbreaks and monitor antibiotic use. The state and local health departments need to coordinate infection control activities. Hospitals and nursing homes need to implement infection control plans and collaborate in sharing data. Doctors need to avoid excessive antibiotic use and practice hand hygiene.

As for the patients, they need to demand action: ask their health care providers what they and the facility are doing to protect the patient from C difficile and CRE infection. Also, patients need to wash their hands and insist that all health care worker wash their hands before touching them.

 

To read the article in its entirety click on link below:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/manoj-jain-md-mph/coordinated-care-can-redu_b_8031016.html

 

 

Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and CDC warns of possible catastrophic consequences

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The CDC has been discussing this matter and publishing information over time in hopes to raise Antibiotic and antibiotic-resistant bacteria awareness in the healthcare industry, and patients/individuals used to depending on Antibiotic therapy for many symptoms that are caused by a virus.

Today the press has released yet one more article with stern headlines regarding “Drug resistant bacteria”  and the possibility of catastrophic consequences combating them.

CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden told reports on Monday that “Without urgent action now, more patients will be thrust back to a time before we had effective drugs.”

The new report has revealed that there are at least two dozen antibiotic resistant bacteria known to harm humans.  Should this path continue some infections will not be able to be treated.

An excerpt from the latest article:

One bacteria atop the agency’s “urgent” list of infections is carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), which typically strike patients in medical facilities and has become resistant to nearly all existing antibiotics. Known as the “nightmare bacteria,” CRE causes life-threatening diarrhea. It has continued to proliferate and has been confirmed in medical facilities in nearly every state.

Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. infections, which cause about 14,000 deaths per year, also made the agency’s urgent list Monday. While resistance to the antibiotics used to treat         C. difficile infections has not yet become a problem, the agency said the bacteria spreads rapidly because it is naturally resistant to many drugs that are used to treat other infections.

Neisseria gonorrhoeae — the drug-resistant form of this bacteria causes gonorrhea, the second most commonly reported infection in the United States. Gonorrhea can cause a variety of illnesses in men and women, including infertility. The CDC estimates there are 820,000 infections each year. In nearly a third of the cases, treatment of the sexually-transmitted disease, is hampered by growing antibiotic resistance.

#1 Prevention remains good hand washing (hand hygiene) before/after eating, before exiting restrooms, before/after diaper changes, before/after patient care, before/after using exam gloves, and as often as necessary.

Speak to your healthcare professional when combating a cold and utilize recommended over-the-counter cold symptom relievers, natural interventions vs antibiotics.  Antibiotics do not combat viruses.   When in doubt, please visit a Physician and healthcare provider, as they will assess and treat symptoms accordingly.

To learn more about this topic, please click on the following link which will redirect you to the article in its entirety.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/drug-resistant-bacteria-pose-potential-catastrophe-cdc-warns/2013/09/16/4cd2d482-1ed6-11e3-b7d1-7153ad47b549_story.html