Tag Archives: What is C.diff.?

Patient, Family, Caregiver January Symposium Broadcasts During March On C. diff. Spores and More Live Program

CDIFFRADIO.COM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATES to listen in to the leading topic expert presentations

shared on January 15, 2021, at the Patient, Family, Caregiver Symposium:

Beginning Tuesday, March 9 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EST following through on

March 16,  March 23, and  March 30.

A Symposium specifically developed for Patients Diagnosed With a C. diff. Infection, Being Treated For a Clostridioides diffiicile infection, Recovering From a Clostridioides difficile Infection and Recurrences with Family Members and Caregivers.

The Patient & Family C. diff. Symposium was a gathering of healthcare professionals, keynote speakers, health advocates, practitioners, educators, thought leaders, and patients who are transforming the patient experience and changing the way people experience
C. diff. infections worldwide.

Unlike other conferences on this topic, patients will share their C. diff. infection journeys, providing a real-world perspective on patient experience. Our attendees will learn more from this virtual-online symposium and gain knowledge on important topics that will better aid their care and recovery through tools and strategies delivered by keynote speakers.  

The Symposium followed the C Diff Foundation Mission statement –   Educating and Advocating for the prevention, treatments, clinical trials, diagnostics, and environmental safety of Clostridioides difficile
(C. diff.) infections worldwide.

Keynote speakers presented up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and provide important information focused on, yet not limited to,  a Clostridioides difficile infection (also known as C. diff., C. difficile, CDAD, CDI) ……

  • Prevention
  • Treatments
  • Diagnostics
  • Research
  • Environmental Safety
  • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Introduction to Microbiome Research and Studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
  • Antibiotic Stewardship

We hope you enjoy the broadcasts!

 

Program Chair:  Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG

Barbara McGovern, MD     “Treatment of recurrent C. difficile infection with                                                                                        SER-109, an investigational microbiome drug.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD          ” C. diff. Overview – What is a C. diff. Infection?”

Sahil Khanna, MD               “C. diff. Treatments + FMT Overview. “

 

 

 

Simon Cutting, Ph. D.         “Bacillus, and C. diff.  Spore Overview. “

Teena Chopra, MD                ” Introduction to Infection Prevention.”

Doe Kley, RN, MPH              “C. diff. Transitioning from Hospital to Home. “

Courtney Jones                    ” Microbiome, Microbiota, and Gut Health.”

Denise Cardo, MD                “Everyone Has a Role in Antibiotic Awareness.”

Larry Kociolek, MD              “C. diff. Infections in Pediatrics.”

Kathy Bischoff                        “My C. diff.  Journey.”

Renata Johnson                      “My C. diff. Journey.”

Paul Feuerstadt, MD      &    Barbara McGovern, MD

 

This Symposium was hosted by the C Diff Foundation and

Sponsored by Seres Therapeutics  

Clostridioides diffiicle Thrives In an Inflammed Environement ….Research Study From North Carolina State University

Clostridioides difficile thrives in an inflamed environment by generating toxins that support prolonged infection, according to a study from North Carolina State University.

The study, published in Nature Communications, showed how C. diff produces toxins that cause inflammation, eliminating competing bacteria and releasing peptides and amino acids that support the growth of C. diff.

C. diff thrives when other microbes in the gut are absent – which is why it is more prevalent following antibiotic therapy,” corresponding author Casey Theriot, Ph.D., associate professor of infectious disease at North Carolina State University, said. “But when colonizing the gut,
C. diff. also produces two large toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause inflammation. We wanted to know if these inflammation-causing toxins actually give C. diff a survival benefit – whether the pathogen can exploit an inflamed environment in order to thrive.”

Investigators examined two variants of C. diff in vitro and in an antibiotic-treated mouse model. The variants included a wild type C. diff that produces toxins and a genetically modified variant that does not. They found that the wild type C. diff, associated with toxin production, generated more inflammation and tissue damage than the mutant.

To read the article in its entirety, please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.contagionlive.com/view/clostridioides-difficile-thrives-in-inflamed-environment

Investigators also found changes in the expression of metabolic genes, with C. diff in the inflamed environment expressing more genes related to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism that sustains growth.

C. diff’s toxins damage the cells that line the gut,” Theriot said. “These cells contain collagen, which is made up of amino acids and peptides. When collagen is degraded by toxins,
C. diff responds by turning on expression of genes that can use these amino acids for growth.”

Inflammation provided a second benefit to C. diff by creating an inhospitable environment for other bacteria that compete for nutrients. Bacteroidaceae were present in control groups that weren’t infected with toxin-producing C. diff, which was consistent with previous studies that found negative associations between C. diff and Bacteroidaceae.

“I always found it interesting that C. diff causes such intense inflammation,” first author Josh Fletcher, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral researcher at North Carolina State University, said. “Our research shows that this inflammation may contribute to the persistence of C. diff in the gut environment, prolonging infection.”

C. diff is the most significant cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea, causing more than 223,900 infections and 12,800 deaths in the US in 2017, according to a recent report.

The disease has two phases, a spore phase, and vegetative phase. Toxins are released during the vegetative phase, causing diarrhea and other symptoms. But the pathogen is often transmitted during the spore phase, during which it is hardy and isn’t susceptible to gastric acids and alcohol-based hand sanitizer, experts explained during a recent discussion of the disease.

Risks for infection include exposure to C. diff spores and antibiotic use. An investigational drug to prevent the disruption of the gut microbiota by antibiotics is among the most recent developments in the fight against a C diff. infection.

 

C. diff. Infection and Sepsis Overview During a One Year Follow Up

Sepsis was a common Clostridioides difficile infection (C diff) complication throughout a 12-month follow-up period and was most commonly observed in the cohort of patients with 3 or more C diff infection recurrences, according to a paper published in SAGE Open Medicine.

Investigators from around New England conducted a retrospective analysis of more than 46,000 adult patients with C diff infection in order to evaluate the clinical complications of C diff in patients with index and recurrent cases. The investigators used the IQVIA PharMetrics Plus database to looks for patients aged 18-64 years with an index C diff episode that required inpatient stay or an outpatient visit, followed by a treatment for the infection. Treatments included vancomycin, fidaxomicin, metronidazole, rifaximin, or bezlotoxumab, or fecal microbiota transplant (FMT – though it was rare).

Each infection ended after a 14-day C diff-free period was observed, leaving recurrent C diff to be defined as further infection within an 8-week window for a period of 12 months.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link to be redirected:

https://www.hcplive.com/view/sepsis-among-common-c-diff-complications-during-one-year-follow-up-period

A total of 3129 patients (6.7%) experienced 1 recurrence, while 1% had 2 recurrences, and 0.3% had 3 or more recurrences. The study authors also noted that autoimmune diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, were present in 18%, 23%, 24%, and nearly 40% of patients, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences.

Antibiotics were prescribed for three-quarters of all patients in all groups in the 6 months preceding the index C diff infection, the investigators found. Gastric acid-suppressing agents were prescribed in 28%, 33%, 39%, and 38%, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences, the study authors also noted.

Vancomycin was used to treat about a third of all index C diff infection patients, while metronidazole was used to treat a little more than half of the patients, the study authors wrote. Fidaxomicin was used to treat about 4% of patients. Vancomycin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic used in recurrent C diff cases, with 55% of patients getting the antibiotic for the first recurrence, 56% getting it for their second recurrence, and 60% getting it for their third recurrence.

During the 12-month follow-up period, the investigators observed sepsis in 16%, 27%, 33%, and 43%, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences. No patient had more than 2 sepsis episodes during the 12-month follow-up period. Additionally, subtotal colectomy or diverting loop ileostomy was performed in 4%, 7%, 9%, and 10% of patients, respectively, in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more C diff infection recurrences.

“Our findings indicate that, among patients with more recurrent C diff infection, there was a parallel trend for higher rates of colectomy and sepsis,” the study authors wrote.

The study authors also said that patients with 3 or more recurrences also had the highest health care resource utilization and total, all-cause, direct medical costs of all the recurrence cohorts. Sepsis was highest among this group with the most recurrences, and the study authors hypothesized that this was due to having more opportunities to suffer from this type of adverse outcome.

“Reduction in recurrent C diff infection may be an important step to reduce the burden of serious clinical complications,” they concluded.

Sepsis Resources: 

https://www.global-sepsis-alliance.org/

https://www.sepsis.org/

 

C. diff. Spores and More Live Broadcast Enters Season VI

Welcome to Season VI on 

C. diff. Spores and More

Live Broadcast, sponsored

by Clorox Healthcare.

 

With over 260 archived episodes ~ Listen At Your Leisure


It’s a new year with an entirely new line up of guests eager to share their C. difficile research, infection prevention methods, clinical trials in progress, the updates in the C. diff. community, and much more.

 

 

 

 

In March the post-Patient and Family Symposium presentations will broadcast, in the event you weren’t able to attend the live-online event hosted on January 15th. The first annual Patient and Family Symposium was sponsored by Seres Therapeutics

Do you have a specific topic of interest or would like to learn more about a specific product or procedure?  Send an email to info@cdifffoundation.org and share your suggestions and interests.

“None of us can do this alone ~ All of us can do this together.”

Join us every Tuesday at 1:00 p.m. EST for the Live Broadcast  www.cdiffradio.com

 

Monday, April 27th – 6:00 p.m. EST Leading Gastroenterologist’s Caterina Oneto, MD & Paul Feuerstadt, MD Host C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network

MONDAY,  April 27th   –  6:00 p.m. EST
Hosts and Co-Directors

Doctors Caterina Oneto, MD &
Paul Feuerstadt, MD

 

Topic:  Doctors Oneto and Feuerstadt will discuss C. difficile Infections; The What, Where and How.  There will be opportunities to ask a  brief question to the physicians.  We appreciate Dr.’s Oneto and Dr. Feuerstadt for donating their time to discuss C. difficile Infections and to provide information regarding prevention, treatments available, and environmental safety products available.   Join Dr. Oneto and Dr. Feuerstadt’s session hosted on the fourth Monday of each month.
Via: Teleconference Call:  1 – 646 -927 – 0297   Conference ID:  123560#
3:00 p.m. PT     4:00 p.m. MT     5:00 p.m. CT    6:00 p.m ET

NOTE:  The Physicians will not prescribe, diagnose, or provide medical assessment answers to any individuals participating in their support session.  Please contact the Physician providing care for a C. diff. Infection or other diagnoses that are being treated.    Thank you.

 

SUPPORT IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY

Support and information sessions are for everyone especially for —

  • Families.
  • Clinicians,
  • C. diff. survivors continuing their recovery from a prolonged illness.
  • Patients working their way through any long-term wellness draining diagnosis.

All Sessions are FREE and accessible from the USA and 57 countries  *

Support is available to anyone seeking additional information with the desire to speak with others that understand the journey.

  • PLEASE NOTE *  If you, or anyone you know, are experiencing mental or physical symptoms causing pain, fever, discomfort, C. difficile symptoms or changes in a diagnosed infection, or a change in emotional behavior or having suicidal thoughts, DO NOT wait for a scheduled support session.  Contact a physician or seek medical attention at a local clinic or hospital immediately. Thank you.

The C. diff. Global TeleSupport Network program is the first-ever FREE GLOBAL patient and family educational support program developed by a U.S. non-profit 501(c)(3) — The C Diff Foundation is dedicated to educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, support, and environmental safety worldwide.