Tag Archives: Nutrition

Lactose Free Vanilla Pudding Recipe

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Pudding is one of those easy and quick comforting desserts that can be prepared anytime  and enjoyed as an after school snack or dessert. This dairy-free (Lactose Free) pudding recipe is always a hit and it’s easy.

 

Ingredients:  (makes 4 Servings)  (t. = teaspoon, T=Tablespoon)

 

  • 2/3 cups white granulated sugar
  • ¼ t. salt
  • ¼ cup cornstarch
  • 2 ½ cups unsweetened plain almond milk or other non-dairy milk alternatives   (Soy, Cashew, Rice, Coconut, etc..).
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1 t. vanilla extract
 Directions:
  1. In a small saucepan, whisk together the sugar and salt.
  2. In a small dish, combine the cornstarch with 2 T. of the almond milk, mixing until dissolved. Add the cornstarch mixture, remaining milk of your choice and egg yolks to the saucepan, whisking until combined.
  3. Cook the pudding over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens and bubbles just begin to form on the surface.
  4. Whisking constantly, turn down the heat to low and cook for about 1 minute more.
  5. Pour the pudding through a fine sieve into a heatproof dish and stir in the vanilla extract.
  6. Place plastic wrap directly on the surface of the pudding and chill at least 2 hours before serving.

 

 

Thanks and Appreciation To Our Guests For Joining Us On C. diff. Spores And More Season II

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As Season II concludes, we wish to take this opportunity to sincerely thank each
and every guest for taking time out of their
busy schedule and joining us on Tuesday’s at
10:00a Pacific Time / 1:00p Eastern Time over the past seven months.

C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network will be taking a break and will return to live broadcasting on  January 17th, 2017 with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) leading the way with our guest
Dr. Katherine Fleming-Dutra, Medical Officer, CDC’s Office of Antibiotic Stewardship.

A Prescription for Over-Prescribing: The Key to Fighting
Antibiotic Resistance

Dr. Fleming-Dutra is a medical epidemiologist with the Office of Antibiotic Stewardship in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Centers Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Dr. Fleming-Dutra is a pediatrician and pediatric emergency medicine physician and has focused on infectious diseases epidemiology and antibiotic stewardship in the outpatient setting in her career at CDC.

Join Dr. Fleming-Dutra as she discusses a recent study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association, was released showing that at least 30 percent of all prescriptions written in doctors’ offices and emergency rooms are completely unnecessary. So how do we use these alarming results to transform the culture of over-prescribing Dr. Katherine Fleming-Dutra, M.D., will:

  • Give a detailed explanation of the study results, and provide an in-depth review of specific findings;
  • Highlight what CDC is doing to promote antibiotic stewardship across healthcare settings, and
  • Identify what clinicians, other health care professionals, and patients can do to improve antibiotic prescribing, therefore fighting antibiotic resistance.

 

C diff Radio™ Live Broadcast AND Podcasts

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network™

  brought to you by VoiceAmerica and
sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

An educational program that is dedicated to  C. difficile Infections  and more–

 

Click On The LOGO  Above And Enjoy Listening To the Live Broadcasts In the C. diff. Spores and More Podcast Library.

 

Live Broadcast airs
on Tuesdays at:    10a PT,    11a MT,   12p CT,    1p ET

We are pleased to share  “C. diff. Spores and More ™”  with you because, as advocates of  C. diff.,  we know the importance of this cutting-edge new weekly radio show  and what it means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.–

Hard Facts: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

• More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes.

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection. Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a
C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.

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Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the
Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience a recurrence of the infection and 1 out of every 9 patients over the age of 65 diagnosed with a HAI – C. diff. infection died within 30 days of being diagnosed. Older Americans are quite vulnerable to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of acquiring a C. diff. infection. The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  C Diff Foundation supports hundreds of communities by sharing the Foundation’s mission and  raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The C Diff Foundation volunteer Advocates are greatly appreciated and continue to create positive changes by sharing their time  aiding in the success of our mission “Raising C. diff. awareness ™”  worldwide.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower listeners worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™ is made possible through our official Corporate Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

We look forward to sharing time with our worldwide listeners when we return in January, Season III. 

Until then………………

We send out get-well wishes to everyone being treated for and recovering from a C. difficile infection and all wellness draining illnesses worldwide.

“None of us can do this alone – All of us can do this together!”

Hydrating Watermelon Drink by Michele Martello, Wellness Advocate

 

Ingredients Used in this video:

Seedless Watermelon

Water infused with fruit

Splash of Coconut Water

Fresh Mint

Ice

Equipment:   Blender

 

Created by Michele Martello, Wellness Advocate for the C Diff Foundation

July 2016

The C Diff Foundation Offers Patients, Family Members, and Clinicians Global Community Support

We are pleased to announce the

C. diff. Global Community Support Program —   an extension of  our

existing patient program – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program.

Our Foundation Members and Medical Advocates, leading the support groups, via: teleconferencing, will now have the ability to offer support to patients, families, clinicians, and individuals seeking support —  in  the U.S. and 57 countries.

Below you will find the list of countries, with their local cities,  able
to participate in our teleconferencing support groups:

Argentina – Buenos Aires and Cordoba
Australia – Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney
Austria – Countrywide, Vienna
Bahrain – Countrywide
Belgium – Brussels
Brazil – Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
Bulgaria – Sofia
Canada – Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Toronto,
Vancouver, Winnipeg.
Chile – Santiago
China – Beijing
Columbia – Bogota
Costa Rica – National VolP
Croatia – Zagreb
Cyprus – Nicosia
Czech Republic – Prague
Denmark – Countrywide
Dominican Republic – Santo Domingo
El Salvador – San Salvador
Finland – Helsinki
France – Marseille, Paris
Germany – Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich
Greece – Athens
Hong Kong – Countrywide
Hungary – Budapest
India – Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai
Ireland – Dublin, National VolP
Israel – Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
Italy – Milan, Rome
Japan – Tokyo
Latvia- Riga
Lithuania – Vilnius
Luxembourg – Countrywide
Malaysia – Kuala Lumpur
Malta – Countrywide
Mexico – Guadalajara, Mexico City, Monterrey
Netherlands – Amsterdam
New Zealand – Auckland
Norway – Oslo
Panama – Panama City
Peru – Lima
Poland – Warsaw
Portugal – Countrywide
Puerto Rico – Aguadilla
Romania – Bucharest
Russia – Moscow
Singapore – Singapore
Slovakia – Bratislava
Slovenia – Ljubljana
South Africa – Cape Town, Johannesburg
South Korea – Seoul
Spain – Barcelona, Madrid
Sweden – Malmo, Stockholm
Switzerland – Bern, Geneva, Zurich
Turkey – Istanbul
Ukraine – National VolP
United Kingdom – Birmingham, Edinburgh, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, National.
Venezuela – Caracas

Registration will remain the same – through the main number (919) 201-1512
or utilizing the nationwide U.S. Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF, or from the Foundation website
http://www.cdifffoundation.org C. diff. Global Community Support page.

Support is only a phone call away worldwide

CdiffGlobalSupportF

Sweet Potato vs White Potato — Time To Make A Switch

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Besides simple starches, raw sweet potatoes are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber and beta-carotene (a provitamin A carotenoid), while having moderate contents of other micronutrients, including vitamin B5, vitamin B6 and manganese (table). When cooked by baking, small variable changes in micronutrient density occur to include a higher content of vitamin C at 24% of the Daily Value per 100 g serving (right table)]

The Center for Science in the Public Interest ranked the nutritional value of sweet potatoes as highest among several other foods.

Sweet potato varieties with dark orange flesh have more beta-carotene than those with light-colored flesh, and their increased cultivation is being encouraged in Africa where vitamin A deficiency is a serious health problem. A 2012 study of 10,000 households in Uganda found that children eating beta-carotene enriched sweet potatoes suffered less vitamin A deficiency than those not consuming as much beta-carotene. (1)

Benefits of Sweet Potato:

  • Sweet potato is one of the high calorie starch foods (provide 90 calories/100 g vis a vis to 70 calories/100 g in potato). The tuber, however, contains no saturated fats or cholesterol, and is rich source of dietary fiber, anti-oxidants, vitamins, and minerals than potatoes.
  • Its calorie content mainly comes from starch, a complex carbohydrate. Sweet potato has higher amylose to the amylopectin ratio than that in potato. Amylose raises the blood sugar levels rather slowly on comparison to simple fruit sugars (fructose, glucose etc) and therefore, recommended as a healthy food item even in diabetes.
  • The tuber is an excellent source of flavonoid phenolic compounds such as beta-carotene and vitamin-A. 100 g tuber provides 14,187 IU of vitamin A and 8,509 µg of ß-carotene, a value which is the highest for any root-vegetables categories. These compounds are powerful natural antioxidants. Vitamin A is also required for the human body to maintain integrity of mucus membranes and skin. It is a vital nutrient for healthy vision. Consumption of natural vegetables and fruits rich in flavonoids helps protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • The total antioxidant strength of raw sweet potato measured in terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) is 902 µmol TE/100 g.
  • The tubers are packed with many essential vitamins such as pantothenic acid (vitamin B-5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), and thiamin (vitamin B-1), niacin, and riboflavin. These vitamins are essential in the sense that the human body requires them from external sources to replenish. These vitamins function as co-factors for various enzymes during metabolism.
  • Sweet potato provides good amount of vital minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and potassium that are very essential for enzyme, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism.
  • Sweet potato top greens are indeed more nutritious than the tuber itself. Weight per weight, 100 g of fresh leaves carry more iron, vitamin C, folates, vitamin K, and potassium but less sodium than its tuber.  (2)

Simple Baked Potato Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 large sweet potatoes
  • 2 pinches salt

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Coat the bottom of a glass or non-stick baking dish with olive oil, just enough to coat.
  2. Wash and peel the sweet potatoes. Cut them into medium size pieces. Place the cut sweet potatoes in the baking dish and turn them so that they are coated with the olive oil. Sprinkle moderately with oregano, and salt and pepper (to taste).  The potatoes can also be mashed at this time for easier digestion.  (3)

 

Resource: 

(1)  Sweet Potato Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_potato

(2)  Sweet Potato Benefits:   http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/sweet_potato.html

(3)  Baked Sweet Potato Recipe:  Allrecipe.com :     http://allrecipes.com/recipe/18249/baked-sweet-potatoes/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=4

C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

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The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website https://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html

Frozen Yogurt Recipe To Make At Home

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A message from the Registered Dietician 

With the warmer weather season upon us…..a cup of refreshing homemade frozen yogurt is not only enjoyable but is beneficial.

Natural probiotics should be ingested at the end of a meal; on a full stomach. This is due to the Ph balance of the G.I. system making it a desirable time for the live cultures to survive and be the most beneficial to the gastrointestinal system.

* Note: When taking Antibiotics it is best to wait two hours after ingesting probiotics to obtain the maximum benefits of the probiotics.
Frozen Yogurt Recipe : 6 ounces fresh or frozen berries stirred into 16 ounces vanilla yogurt then placed into a container recommended for freezing and enjoy.   For extra caloric value:  Add a 5 ounce package of shortbread cookies crushed well and then stir into the mixture before freezing.