Tag Archives: November C.diff. Awareness

Thanksgiving Reflections With Gratitude – 2017

Dear Members, Followers, and Visitors,

It’s hard to believe another  year has caught up with us and here we are preparing for the Thanksgiving holiday and reflecting upon the days that have passed by in 2017.

 

During this year we have been expanding across  the globe and reaching far away lands
meeting great people like you who are devoted to “Promoting C. diff. Awareness” with
the C Diff Foundation.

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We want to extend our gratitude to you and everyone for the warm welcome this past
year.  In our travels, and communication we get to discover many organizations doing outstanding work.

Each organization dedicated in researching and developing new avenues to prevent and treat a Clostridium difficile infection are all successful, appreciated, and applauded by the patients and their families who are being treated and recovering from a          C. difficile infection.

The C Diff Foundation is an exceptional organization, and its special ingredients
are what makes us so proud to be a part. The first of these is our outreach programs. We offer patients and their families opportunities worldwide to gain support and information which is vital during a C. diff. infection and during the recovery phase of this infection.

The second special ingredient is the dedicated volunteering staff here in the USA,  most of whom have been faithfully serving our Foundation since the formation in 2012.

The third special ingredient is you and all the Volunteer Advocates worldwide with the financial supporters who see to it that our mission continues promoting  “C. difficile Awareness” with the many programs in place to make you and your communities stronger than ever in C. diff. infection prevention, treatment information, support, and environmental safety products available.

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As we work together today and in the coming  year, seeking opportunities to bring hearts to a mend through the C. diff. Global Community Support Program, we look forward to speak with you by phone via: Teleconferencing sessions or in person at a local event.  Sessions are scheduled each month and available throughout the US and accessible from 57 countries right now.  Register through the website support page or call us (919) 201-1512 and register for upcoming sessions.  It will be our pleasure to speak with you about C. diff. infections, financial support, pharmaceutical information, group discussions related to anxiety and depression, nutrition, and sessions speaking with others that truly understand the diagnosis and ways to work through it.

We encourage you to introduce others to the C Diff Foundation and to the validated information provided.

As we come together with friends, family, and strangers~  let us reflect on our own thoughts and reflections of gratitude and let us light a candle to signify “hope” – the shining light that we see in the shadows when turmoil and struggles occur.

The days may becoming shorter during the winter months on the horizon but our light of “hope” for better health and stronger days has never shown brighter than today.

 

 

 

 

We especially wish to thank the many USA Governors for signing State Proclamations declaring “November Clostridium difficile Infection Awareness Month.”

The gratitude expressed by the patients and their families is overwhelming and the health care professionals around the globe hold this statement in the highest regards.

“We are thankful!”

We are all truly grateful for the opportunity to work with dedicated volunteers, healthcare professionals, scientific researchers, and associates from so many worthy organizations.

Thank you for all that you do for others, for their communities – and partnering with the C Diff Foundation in  our mission of educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide!

C. diff. Awareness Events Scheduled For November

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SHOPPING:

Shop Amazon to support the many programs and educational workshops provided by the C Diff Foundation worldwide —

It’s a pleasure to share the new way to give to the C Diff Foundation.  Amazon will share a portion of the proceeds from your purchases with the  C Diff Foundation.  While you are shopping on-line you are also donating, and we are grateful.

Here is how it works:

* Shop Amazon through AmazonSmile     C Diff Foundation

Click on the link below to access the site

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/46-1272728

                        It is as easy as that!

Education:

http://globalcdifficilecongress.org/

The Global C. difficile Congress FREE Webinar will take place on November 11th at 8:00 a.m. Eastern Time will broaden existing knowledge surrounding C. difficile infection (CDI)  prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.  The drive and passion takes us forward in promoting the practical and technical advancements taking place across the globe.  Healthcare Professionals from every area of expertise, will discuss the control and  treatment options,  the healthcare perspectives, antibiotic-resistance stewardship programs, and much more to raise awareness and share successful implementations and guidelines.

The Global C. difficile Congress will be eight sessions presented by topic experts  – in four hours – in one day –  with goals to change the C. difficile world with a common focus; To
improve C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the healthcare communities worldwide.

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Twitter chats and tweets take place in honor of the
Global C. diff. Awareness Campaign From  November 1st throughout the month.

There will be a #CdiffTwitterChat

Join Us on NOVEMBER 18TH at 3:30 p.m. Eastern Time with  International Infectious Disease Expert, Dr. Hudson Garrett Jr. for a real-time Question and Answer Twitter Chat about Clostridium difficile infection and disease. Questions are welcomed from both patients and healthcare providers. Registration is complimentary to all those interested.  Click on the link below for more information:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1411035768914278/

 

VOLUNTEER PATIENT ADVOCATES:

worldaroundWe applaud our Volunteer Patient Advocates around the globe who continue sharing life-saving information from villages to cities organizing meetings during the month of November to reach a little higher, speak a little louder and elevate C. difficile infection awareness, prevention, treatments, and environmental safety for everyone to witness a decrease in C. diff. infections worldwide.  Each Volunteer is a special leaf, on each branch of the growing  C Diff Foundation tree.  Our sincere gratitude to each of our Volunteers worldwide!

Follow the C Diff Foundation on

Facebook    https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio/                                                    Twitter @CDiffFoundation

Pinetrest, and LinkedIn and join the fight and save lives.

Thank you for your support that helps our mission continue moving forward.

Educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety and support worldwide.

Be sure to check back as new events will be added weekly.

C. diff. Awareness Across the Globe

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Beginning November 1st,

join the C Diff Foundation in

“Raising C. diff.  Awareness.”

Let’s begin with promoting C. difficile prevention to share in witnessing a decrease in C. difficile infections worldwide.

Ways to PREVENT acquiring a C. diff. infection:

HAND-WASHING remains the #1 course of action in infection prevention.

Knowing how and when to wash hands is also important.

Correct Hand-washing steps to follow:

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 30 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well with water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel.
  • Turn off faucets with a clean dry towel, and wipe hands with a clean dry towel.

WHEN is it a good time to wash hands?

  • Before, during, and after handling and preparing food.
  • Upon Entering a Patient’s room and Before Existing a Patient’s room.
  • Before and after eating.
  • Before and after patient care.
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound.
  • Before  exiting a restroom.
  • After changing diapers.
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • After petting a pet or any livestock animals.
  • After touching garbage.
  • AND OFTEN.

Limit Antibiotic Use — Discuss Symptoms With Healthcare Providers.

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommends infection control protocols be shared between healthcare professionals and long-term facility administrators for the safety of the patient, visitors, and other patient’s safety.

Question the necessity of antibiotics to treat symptoms.  Unnecessary use of antibiotics raises the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Remember antibiotics do not effect viruses.  Healthcare professionals; confirming a bacterial infection before prescribing antibiotic course of treatment is advised.

Take the Antibiotic “Resistance Fighter” Pledge

How to be a resistance fighter:  Limit the use of Antibiotics! Understand that antibiotics are only effective against bacteria and not viruses: colds, flu and most coughs are caused by viruses and will get better on their own.  Treat your flu and cold symptoms and let your immune system fight the virus.  Antibiotics will not help you get better quickly, and may give you side effects such as diarrhea and thrush. They can also lead to acquired C. diff. infections. They won’t stop your virus spreading to other people only YOU can do that with good hand hygiene.  Don’t ask for antibiotics , instead ask your doctor about the best way to treat your symptoms.   If you are prescribed antibiotics ask your doctor about the risks and benefits and always take them exactly as prescribed. Never take someone else’s antibiotics, always speak with your Primary Care Physician (PCP) or healthcare professional when symptoms linger or worsen.

Let us all take the “Resistance Fighter” Pledge and feel free to share the pledge with            everyone you know

I will not expect antibiotics for colds and flu as they have no effect on viruses.
I will take antibiotics as directed IF I am prescribed them, and not ask for them.
I will practice good hygiene, making hand washing #1, and help stop giving germs a free ride.

Now we can ALL spread knowledge, not infections and encourage others to join the fight against antibiotic resistance.

“Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work” CDC Campaign :

Get Smart About Antibiotics Week has been an annual effort to coordinate the work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. The campaign organized its first annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week in 2008. CDC’s Get Smart campaign, housed in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, collaborated with state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns and non-profit and for-profit partners. The success of the pilot year was measured by 1) dissemination of educational materials and messages, 2) partner satisfaction, and 3) media interest. A robust evaluation of the pilot week determined that each of these goals was met and exceeded. This was followed by other successful Get Smart About Antibiotics Week observances.

During November 14-20th, 2016 —  the Annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week will be observed. As in past years, the effort will coordinate work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. As with the past observances, messages and resources for improving antibiotic use in  healthcare settings from CDC’s Get Smart for Healthcare campaign will be included. Get Smart for Healthcare is a program housed in CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.

  • Ask your physician questions such as, “Do I really need an antibiotic?”
  • Bacteria only, not viruses (common cold, flu), can be killed by antibiotics.
  • Complete the entire course of prescribed antibiotics, even if you feel better midway through.

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacterial changes reduce or eliminate an antibiotic’s ability to kill the bacteria.

The Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC)  recommends the following:

  • Take antibiotics only and exactly as instructed by your healthcare provider.
  • Only take antibiotics prescribed for you.
  • Do not save or share antibiotics prescribed to you.
  • Do not pressure your healthcare provider to prescribe you antibiotics.

C. diff. Testing:  When a patient presents symptoms (diarrhea with abdominal cramping/pain, fatigue, fever) ordering a C. difficile stool test to rule out a C. diff. infection is beneficial, especially if the patient has been treated with antibiotics within ninety-days.

Environmental Safety:  Disinfecting a patient’s room, treated for a positive C. difficile infection, with a bleach or Federal EPA registered spore-killing product will help eliminate      C. difficile spores from being spread to another patient’s room.  Environmental safety is also an important matter in home-care.  Cleaning all high-touch areas in both long-term and acute care facilities, and home environments will help decrease the spread of this infection.  (High-touch surfaces: light switches, door knobs/handles, bed-side commodes, bathroom hand rails, commode, sink and sink handles, counter-tops, floors, bath-tubs, showers, canes, wheel-chairs, and all medical equipment in a patient’s room).

Personal Protection: ISOLATION: Visitors and Environmental professionals, wear proper personal protection equipment when treating and cleaning areas/rooms of a     C. difficile patient.  (gloves, gowns, shoe coverings, protective eye wear if using using spray solutions).

Patient Isolation:  Contact Precautions: Protect the patient and others by keeping a C. difficile patient in isolation in long-term and acute care facilities.  This will prevent the spread of infection to others and other areas within the facilities.

Communication:  If a patient is being transferred from either a long-term or acute care facility, communicate to the facility intake personnel the patient’s C. diff. infection and necessary infection control protocols to be implemented for the patient and other patient’s safety.

The CDC has been sharing public announcements regarding the use of Antibiotics for both healthcare professionals and patients alike.  Colds, Ear and Sinus symptoms may be caused by a virus, not bacteria.  Taking antibiotics to treat a virus makes antibiotic medications less effective when they are needed while raising the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Limit the use of Antibiotics to reduce the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection  (Bacterial infections and the treatment of symptoms will be determined and should be followed by the treating healthcare professionals). * November 17-23rd, 2014 join the CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign.

“None of us can do this alone…..all of us can do this together”

For additional C. difficile information, review the Infection Prevention categories available on the website :   http://www.cdifffoundation.org

 

 

 

Sources: CDC