Tag Archives: infection prevention

Xavier University Researchers 2015 Study Demonstrated That By Using Launderable Mattress Barrier Cover Could Decrease the Number Of Patients Who Became Infected With C. difficile by 50%

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In 2010 Xavier University researcher
Dr. Edmond Hooker began research delving into a possible link between hospital beds and healthcare acquired infections (HAIs).

It immediately became apparent that hospital mattresses have been frequently linked to outbreaks of HAI;s. Hospital mattresses are soft porous surfaces.

They are designed to allow moisture to move away from the patient to prevent skin breakdown and bedsores. However, this design makes it impossible for the mattress surface to be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected using currently available cleaning products.

Dr. Hooker’s first line of scientific inquiry was to culture the surfaces of mattresses that had been “terminally” cleaned and were ready for the next patient. In 2011, the Xavier team showed that these mattresses were still contaminated with pathogenic bacteria despite having been cleaned.

Again in 2012, while investigating the use of a launderable mattress barrier cover,

Dr. Hooker showed that mattresses cleaned using traditional hospital methods were still contaminated with pathogenic bacteria.

Prior research demonstrated that patients who are placed in a bed where the previous patient had Clostridium difficile (C. diff) and/or other bacterial infections are at an increased risk of acquiring those infections.

In 2015, researchers from Xavier University published the results of a landmark study. It demonstrated that, by using the launderable mattress barrier cover in two long-term acute care hospitals (treating extremely ill patients), they could decrease the number of patients who became infected with C. diff by 50%, even when the beds of C. diff patients had been cleaned using bleach.

Another recent study, just published in JAMA, demonstrated that hospital beds are the vector for transmission of C. diff even from asymptomatic patients who had occupied the same bed and received antibiotics during their hospital stay.

It is clear that the hospital environment, especially the hospital bed, is a major vector in the transmission of C. diff and many other bacteria that cause HAIs.

Healthcare providers must find ways to ensure that hospital mattresses are cleaned and disinfected properly between patients, and that additional non-chemical measures are taken, if available, to protect patients.

Enjoy the following Video Clips For Additional Trinity Guardion News

 

*Please note – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. Thank You.

C Diff Foundation Global Network Welcomes Ron Romano, RN

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We are pleased to welcome Ron Romano, RN to the C Diff Foundation Global Network.

Ron Romano, RN  presides as Infection Prevention Advocate.

 

Ron has certifications from the following organizations :

      • American Association for LTC Nursing – Co-founder Past President – 2007- 2015
      • American Association for Safe Patient Handling – Board Member 2010-2012
      • Association for Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology – Current Member
      • Safety Specialist LTC – Certification – Current

C. difficile Infections are no stranger to Ron as his family members have also been touched by this infection.  His background in healthcare and passion for Infection Prevention and Epidemiology is an asset to many.  Ron is the Owner, President and CEO of Safety Net LLC in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Safety Net is a national healthcare safety consulting and distribution company providing unique product solutions to mitigate risk associated to infections. We serve acute care hospitals, post-acute and home-care. Our solutions protect our healthcare workers and those under their care.

Ron has also been the Past-President in the following organizations:

American Association for LTC Nursing (AALTCN) 07-15    The AALTCN is a professional organization that supports all levels of caregivers providing career ladder with supporting education, certifications and resources. AALTCN has recently merged with the American Association for Nurse Assessment Coordinators to form the largest professional nursing organization in long term care.

Health Education Network – 07-15,  Co-owner – President

Health Education Network is a medical publication company that provides Nursing education for all levels of caregivers on a variety of topics for LTC. Certificate programs are available for Staff Development Coordinators, Nurse Assessment Coordinators, Director of Nursing in LTC, RN and LPN in LTC.

National Association Director of Nursing Administration (NADONA/LTC) Cincinnati, Ohio 01-07

NADONA/LTC is a professional organization representing Directors of Nursing, Assistant Directors of Nursing and Clinical Managers in long-term care. NADONA/LTC has 38 state chapters nationally and internationally in Canada.

We welcome Ron to the C Diff Foundation and appreciate his healthcare background to join us in promoting Infection prevention and C. diff. Awareness worldwide with fellow members

CDC Launches Clean Hands Count Campaign May 5, 2016 On World Hand Hygiene Day

In The News:   #CleanHandsCount

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CDC Launches Clean Hands Count Campaign

Today, May 5, 2016 –   World Hand Hygiene Day, CDC has launched a new hand hygiene campaign for healthcare providers, patients, and their loved ones called Clean Hands Count. The campaign aims to:

  • Improve healthcare provider adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations.
  • Address the myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene.
  • Empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands

 

Hand Hygiene Is Everyone’s Responsibility
Everyone CAN Do Their Part At Preventing Infections Worldwide.

 

  • Did you know?
    • On average, healthcare providers clean their hands less than half of the times they should.
    • Alcohol-based hand sanitizer is more effective and less drying to the skin than using soap and water.
    • Using alcohol-based hand sanitizer does NOT cause antibiotic resistance.

    Patients may be at risk of getting an infection while they are being treated for something else.

    The science is clear: Clean hands protect patients and healthcare providers from dangerous and deadly infections.

    Check out today’s Public Health Matters blog to learn other things you may not know about hand hygiene. Visit: http://blogs.cdc.gov/publichealthmatters/2016/05/what-you-may-not-know-about-hand-hygiene/

    Join the CDC  today – May 5, 2016 – at 2 pm ET

    for a Twitter chat on hand hygiene.

    Follow #CleanHandsCount and @CDCgov and be sure to let us know

    who your #CleanHandsCount for

    To learn more about the CDC hand hygiene  Clean Hands Count campaign please visit:

    http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/

World Health Organization (WHO) Recommends Six-Step Hand-Hygiene Technique

Scientists reveal how to wash your hands: Research shows six step process is most efficient at killing bacteria.,  It turns out that just lathering your hands with soap, rubbing them vigorously for 20 seconds and rinsing is not the most effective way to clean them.
Experts now say the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is far more superior than a rival three step process.

https://youtu.be/XedODzGrmic

During the randomized controlled trial in an urban, acute-care teaching hospital, researchers observed 42 physicians and 78 nurses completing hand-washing using an alcohol-based hand rub after delivering patient care. The six-step technique was determined to be microbiologically more effective for reducing the median bacterial count (3.28 to 2.58) compared to the three-step method (3.08 to 2.88). However, using the six-step method required 25 percent more time to complete (42.50 seconds vs. 35 seconds).

 

HOW TO PROPERLY WASH YOUR HANDS WITH THE SIX-STEP TECHNIQUE  

1. To properly wash your hands using the superior six-step method begin by wetting hands with water and grab either a dollop of soap or hand rub.

2. Begin rubbing your palms together with your fingers closed, then together with fingers interlaced.

3. Move your right palm over left dorsum with interlaced fingers and vice versa – make sure to really rub in between your fingers.

4. Then interlock your fingers and rub the back of them by turning your wrist in a half circle motion.

5. Clasp your left thumb in your right palm and rub in in a rotational motion from the tip of your fingers to the end of the thumb, then switch hands.

6. And finally scrub the inside of your right hand with your left fingers closed and the other hand.

 

‘Only 65 percent of providers completed the entire hand hygiene process despite participants having instructions on the technique in front of them and having their technique observed.’

 

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Resourece:

(1)  http://www.shea-online.org/View/ArticleId/409/Six-Step-Hand-Washing-Technique-Found-Most-Effective-for-Reducing-Bacteria.aspx

 

Seal Shield LLC, A Healthcare Technology Company, Introduces SKY™ To Their Family Of UVC Sanitizers, Designed To Kill Bacteria and Viruses On Hard To Clean Consumer Electronics

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Seal Shield LLC (Jacksonville, FL), today will demonstrate the SKY™ family of UV Sanitizers at the CES- Consumer Electronics Show, Sands Booth #73213. 

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The SKY™ is the world’s first UV Sanitizer to kill more than 99.95% of pathogens in less than 30 seconds. Designed for use in hospitals to protect patients and practitioners from dangerous cross contamination infections, the Sky is also the perfect solution for mobile retailers and IT / MIS professionals who service and support mobile devices of unknown or dubious origins.

Tablet computers and smart phones have been proven to harbor harmful bacteria and viruses. A study published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology warns that “twenty to thirty percent of viruses can be readily transferred from a fingertip to a glass surface, like that on a touch screen.”

“Mobile device hygiene is imperative in today’s pathogen rich environments. SKY™ was designed to be easy to use, and it can safely disinfect virtually any mobile device in under 30 seconds,” states Seal Shield CEO, Brad Whitchurch.

The SKY™ UVC sanitizers use high intensity, 254 nanometer UVC light, at close proximity of less than 60 thousandths of an inch, to thoroughly disinfect a tablet or smart phone and achieve up to a 6 log reduction in pathogens such as MRSE, VRE, MDR-gram negative, Norovirus and C.diff..

The Seal Shield SKY™ is currently available in 2 models.

The SKY™ 6Xi features a horizontal orientation, ideal for desktop applications.

The SKY™ 7Xi features vertical orientation and can be wall mounted or placed on a mobile cart.

The SKY™ sanitizers are the latest additions to Seal Shield’s family of UV infection prevention devices which include the ElectroClave™ and MoonBean™ UV sanitizers.

Seal Shield is a world leader in infection control technology. Seal Shield designs, develops and manufactures medical grade, infection prevention technology for hospitals and the home including UV sanitizers, air purification systems, antimicrobial products, waterproof keyboards, mice and TV remote controls.

 

For more information please visit http://www.SealShield.com/

 

To read article in its entirety:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-sanitizers-for-smart-phones-and-tablets-can-reduce-the-spread-of-super-bugs-in-under-30-seconds-300199923.html?tc=eml_cleartime&utm_source=NetSuite+Contacts&utm_campaign=f41fd750a2-SKY%2FCES16&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e25719ba34-f41fd750a2-102891281

C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

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The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website https://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html

“It Takes A Village” Re: Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) and Healthcare-Associated Infections, By Dr. Rosie D. Lyles, MD,MHA,MSc

“It Takes a Village”
By: Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc, Head of Clinical Affairs for Clorox Healthcare
September 21, 2015

With increasing rates of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile now rivals methicillin-resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as the most common organism to cause healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in the United States. (1) The prevalence of C. difficile infections has more than doubled in U.S. hospitals from 2000 to 2009 (2) and CDI is regarded as one of the serious, expensive, and potentially avoidable consequences of hospitalization. The cost of treating CDI in the hospital is $3427-$9960 (in 2012), and the cost of treating patients with recurrent CDI is $11,631, for a total cost of more than $1.2 billion annually in the United States. (3-4)

In June 2015, the White House spearheaded an executive call to action focused on implementing and improving antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) across the continuum of care (acute care facilities, outpatient clinics, doctors’ offices and long-term care facilities). The urgency around this issue stems from the increasing number of antibiotics prescribed, which subsequently breeds multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) like C. difficile. Unnecessary or excessive antibiotic use combined with poor infection control practices may increase the spread of C. difficile within a facility and across facilities when infected patients transfer, such as from a hospital to a nursing home. Increasing evidence suggests that contaminated surfaces in healthcare facilities play an important role in the transmission of several key pathogens including C. difficile, vancomycin – resistant enterococci (VRE), MRSA, Acinetobacter baumannii, and norovirus.

In order to reduce HAIs, all hands on deck are required to support a successful infection prevention strategy. In other words, “it takes a village.” Growing up, I remember hearing the phrase, “it takes a village to raise a child,” meaning there is a partnership within a community with several individuals playing a role in the maturation of a youth. Within a hospital, it’s a collaborative team across several departments that implements evidence-based protocols, continues to educate staff and patients, and maintains compliance of infection control strategies/approaches to reduce the risk of a broad range of infections, including CDI. From the C-suite (administrators and senior management) to direct healthcare providers (such as physicians, nurses, aides, and therapists) and environmental staff (EVS); everyone with direct or indirect contact with a patient’s care plays an essential role.

As a healthcare professional, it’s very important for hospitals to focus on the bigger picture when it comes to infection prevention strategy and control. Prioritizing infection control measures for just one or two pathogens of concern is insufficient. At the end of the day, one pathogen doesn’t trump another because patients don’t want an HAI from ANY pathogen! The horizontal approaches aim to reduce the risk of infections due to a broad array of pathogens through implementation of standardized practices that do not depend on patient-specific conditions:

• Proper hand hygiene
Hand hygiene practices in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines are a key component in preventing and controlling C. difficile, in addition to many other HAI-causing pathogens.
• Universal use of gloves or gloves and gowns
Donning the correct protective equipment minimizes contact with pathogens. It is also important to follow protocols for properly discarding this equipment.
• Universal decolonization (daily optimal bathing with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG))
CHG bathing has been shown to decrease the bioburden of microorganisms on the patient, the environment, and the hands of healthcare personnel.
• Antimicrobial stewardship program
Ensuring every patient receives an antibiotic only when needed: the right agent, at the right dose, for the right duration.
• Evidence-based environmental cleaning and disinfection products
At a minimum, effective environmental cleaning involves using cleaners & disinfectants that are registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Supplementing manual cleaning with new technology like ultraviolet (UV) light provides an extra layer of protection and the most comprehensive approach. UV has the highest-energy form that can inactivate dangerous and persistent pathogens by eradicating microorganism deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that may be left on surfaces, which can be missed with traditional cleaning. Finally, because C. difficile has been found in non-CDI patient rooms, using an EPA-registered sporicidal surface disinfectant to clean all patient rooms (daily and terminal) is great strategy to prevent the spread of the bacteria.

I had the pleasure of attending the CDC’s Environmental Hygiene for Ebola and Other Emerging Pathogens meeting on September 14, 2015, with attendees from academia, private industry, federal employees and health organizations, participated in a roundtable discussion on the research framework needed to determine the public health significance of non-critical environmental surface contamination and provide guidance to healthcare facilities about the methods to reduce the contamination of non-critical environmental surfaces reliably in order to improve patient safety. Every participant present at the meeting agreed that, due to the challenges/barriers that hospitals face with preventing HAIs (both from emerging pathogens and more common pathogens like C. difficile), it takes a village to successfully implement evidence-based protocols, continue to educate and maintain compliance with infection prevention protocols.

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About Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc, Head of Clinical Affairs for Clorox Healthcare

Rosie D. Lyles, MD, MHA, MSc is the Head of Clinical Affairs for the Clorox Professional Products Company where she serves as a research fellow and primary medical science liaison for the healthcare business, supporting all scientific research as well as clinical and product intervention design and development.
Dr. Lyles previously served as a physician researcher and study director for multiple epidemiologic research initiatives in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Cook County Health and Hospitals System, investigating healthcare-associated infections with a particular focus on the epidemiology and prevention of multidrug-resistant organisms and infections in intensive care units and in long-term acute care hospitals. She has directed numerous clinical studies and interventions for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Chicago Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Prevention Epicenter.
During her nine years as a study director and physician researcher at Hektoen Institute for Medical Research, Dr. Lyles’ work included CDC Epicenters Prevention program studies on bloodstream infections, Clostridium difficile infections and case-control studies of community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). She also performed surveillance studies of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) positive patients, examining universal contact isolation and patient skin antisepsis protocols to identify ways to optimize standard infection control measures.
Dr. Lyles received her medical degree from St. Matthew’s University School of Medicine and holds a Master of Health Service Administration from St. Joseph College. She also recently completed a Master of Science in Clinical Research and Translational Sciences through the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is an active member of the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, the Infectious Disease Society of America, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and has served as a peer reviewer for the National Institutes of Health, New England Journal of Medicine, and American Journal of Infection Control.
References:
1. Dubberke, ER, et al. Strategies to Prevent Clostridium difficile Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014, V35:S48-S65
2. Tabak et al., Predicting the Risk for Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile Infection (HO-CDI) at the Time if Inpatient Admission: HO-CDI Risk Score. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2015, 36: 6; 695-701
3. Magill, SS. et al. “Multistate Point-Prevalence Survey of Health Care-Associated Infections.” The New England Journal of Medicine 370.13 (2014): 1198–1208.
4. Dubberke, ER, and Olsen, MA. “Burden of Clostridium Difficile on the Healthcare System.” Clinical infectious diseases 55 Suppl. 2 (2012): S88–92.
5. Septimus, E., et al. “Approaches for preventing Healthcare-associated Infections: Go Long or Go Wide?” Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2014. 35: 7; 797-801