Tag Archives: Hospital acquired infections

Patient Safety In Hospitals Nationwide Continued To Improve From 2010 to 2014 With A Decline In Hospital-Acquired Conditions By 17% According To the 2015 QDR Report

P A T I E N T    S A F E T Y     N E W S

This Patient Safety chartbook is part of a family of documents and tools that support the National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report (QDR).

Patient safety in hospitals nationwide continued to improve from 2010 to 2014, as the overall rate of hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) declined by 17 percent, according to the 2015 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report’s         Chartbook on Patient Safety

Examples of HACs include surgical site infections, adverse drug events, pressure ulcers and catheter-associated urinary tract and vascular infections.

The overall HAC rate declined from 145 per 1,000 hospital stays in 2010 to 121 per 1,000 stays in 2013 and remained at that lower rate in 2014. Approximately 2 million harmful events were avoided from 2010 to 2014, saving an estimated 87,000 lives and $20 billion in health care costs.

Researchers found that more than 60 percent of patient safety measures showed improvement from 2001-2002 through 2013.

http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/chartbooks/patientsafety/index.html?utm_source=GOVDEL&utm_medium=PSLS&utm_term=&utm_content=20&utm_campaign=AHRQ_PSCB_2016

 

Get more information on AHRQ’s patient safety resources.

Healthcare Disinfecting Cell PhoneSoap System

PHONESOAP_CELL_PHONE_CHARGER_UV_SANITIZER_003Cell Phone Soap

Click on the link below to be directed to the PhoneSoap website and learn more about this Cell Phone Disinfecting System Available:

https://www.phonesoap.com/product/healthcare-sanitizing-and-disinfecting/

 

 

PhoneSoap’s UV products are used in hospitals throughout the country

 

UV-C light is already being used in hospitals and clean rooms throughout the world because it has been proven to effectively penetrate and disarm bacteria. The light will sanitize any surface it touches. PhoneSoap has adapted this technology to be portable and accessible to the average health care provider.

 

Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet (PX-UV) Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms

“Evaluation of a Pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet (PX-UV) Disinfection System for Reduction of Healthcare-Associated Pathogens in Hospital Rooms”

A study conducted by Dr. Curtis Donskey, and a team of researchers with the objective to determine the effectiveness of pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection device for reduction in recovery of healthcare-associated pathogens was recently published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology (ICHE).

Michelle M. Nerandzica1 c1, Priyaleela Thotaa2, Thriveen Sankar C.a2, Annette Jencsona1, Jennifer L. Cadnuma2, Amy J. Raya2a3, Robert A. Salataa2a3, Richard R. Watkinsa4 and Curtis J. Donskeya2a3a5

a1 Research Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

a2 Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio

a3 Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

a4 Akron General Medical Center, Akron, Ohio

a5 Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of a pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection device for reduction in recovery of healthcare-associated pathogens.

SETTING Two acute-care hospitals.

METHODS We examined the effectiveness of PX-UV for killing of Clostridium difficile spores, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) on glass carriers and evaluated the impact of pathogen concentration, distance from the device, organic load, and shading from the direct field of radiation on killing efficacy. We compared the effectiveness of PX-UV and ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation, each delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet. In hospital rooms, the frequency of native pathogen contamination on high-touch surfaces was assessed before and after 10 minutes of PX-UV irradiation.

RESULTS On carriers, irradiation delivered for 10 minutes at 4 feet from the PX-UV device reduced recovery of C. difficile spores, MRSA, and VRE by 0.55±0.34, 1.85±0.49, and 0.6±0.25 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/cm2, respectively. Increasing distance from the PX-UV device dramatically reduced killing efficacy, whereas pathogen concentration, organic load, and shading did not. Continuous UV-C achieved significantly greater log10CFU reductions than PX-UV irradiation on glass carriers. On frequently touched surfaces, PX-UV significantly reduced the frequency of positive C. difficile, VRE, and MRSA culture results.

CONCLUSIONS The PX-UV device reduced recovery of MRSA, C. difficile, and VRE on glass carriers and on frequently touched surfaces in hospital rooms with a 10-minute UV exposure time. PX-UV was not more effective than continuous UV-C in reducing pathogen recovery on glass slides, suggesting that both forms of UV have some effectiveness at relatively short exposure times.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2014;00(0): 1–6

(Received July 11 2014)

(Accepted October 14 2014)

To access the report in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2014.36

Global Handwashing Day – October 15th

handwashing-day-poster

October 15th is Global Handwashing Day

Global Handwashing Day was originally created for children and schools, but can be celebrated by anyone promoting handwashing with soap and water.

Each year on October 15, over 200 million people are involved in celebrating “Global Handwashing Day” in over 100 countries around the world.

It all begins with soap (non-antibacterial soap is even better), warm water, and scrub hands (don’t forget to scrub in between fingers) for a minimum of twenty seconds
(singing one rendition of Happy Birthday or the ABC song usually accomplishes the twenty second minimum). Rinse hands well, turn off water faucets with dry paper towel and toss away, proceed to dry hands with dry towel and toss away. Open door handles, turn off light switches with a dry towel, or if possible use elbow so not to recontaminate clean hands.

* Handwashing with soap and water remains the most effective & inexpensive way to prevent serious germs from spreading. Let’s join the millions around the globe and continue to share the news, wash our hands
and stop giving harmful germs a free ride.