Tag Archives: C Diff Foundation’s Raising Cdiff Awareness Worldwide

November IS C.diff. (Clostridium difficile, C.difficile) Infection Awareness Month – Changing Lives – Saving Lives – Making a Difference With You

YOU CAN make a difference!

How?

Let us show you the ways……

It is as simple as sharing a graphic provided below or by sharing the website which is complete with C.diff. Infection key points on  Prevention, Treatments available, Clinical Trials in progress, Environmental Safety, Infection Prevention, Support, Healthcare Provider updates, Patient and Family resources and much more.

www.cdifffoundation.org

The valuable information located on the website can answer questions that develop during a C.difficile infection.  The website also provides important contact information with  listings of free patient/family programs.

It is empowering to share the information through the printed literature available.  The information will be mailed  to a physical address (not e-mailed) and can be shared with friends, family, health care professionals, and within your community.

Having a conversation —- sharing your story, accompanied with the facts found on the website explaining C.diff. prevention, treatments available, clinical trials, environmental safety, and support worldwide, is both appreciated and powerful.

To receive complimentary brochures, magnets and additional information – please complete the form below:

You are invited to join us in advocating for Cdiff Awareness during the month of November and every month after that because educating and advocating  for C.diff. prevention, treatments available, clinical trials, environmental safety, and support is important every day of the year.

Become a Volunteer Patient Advocate today

Thank you for considering taking steps forward and walking with us to witness a global change and decrease in newly diagnosed Clostridium difficile infections worldwide.

With our sincere gratitude 💚

The Committee Chairs, Patient Advocates, and Members of the C Diff Foundation Worldwide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Please Note:  ALL personal information submitted will never be shared or sold by the C Diff Foundation.  Name, Address, e-mail address will be utilized for the purpose set forth in this message.
  • Thank you .

 

Food For Thought, An Overview Of a Low FODMAP Diet and the Importance Of a Registered Dietitian

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The FODMAP Diet is being discussed at greater lengths with patients experiencing gastrointestinal (GI)  challenges and alterations with their GI systems.

 

There is not a specific “C. diff. Diet,” as Clostridium difficile is an infection, however; we know and understand that the G.I. system is quite effected by this infection causing a disruption in normal dietary intake and difficulties maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition on a daily basis.

This brings us to the Low FODMAP Diet. What is it? What does FODMAP stand for? Can it benefit patients diagnosed with C.diff. ? All good questions and this is yet one more topic patients can discuss with their healthcare providers providing their care and with a Registered Dietician with a solid background in Gastroenterology and utilizing the FODMAP diet plan with patients.

FODMAP is an acronym for:
Fermentable (produces gas in the intestines)
Oligosaccharides (fructans and galactans/GOS)
Disaccharides (lactose)
Monosaccharides (excess fructose)
And
Polyols (sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, maltitol, mannitol, xylitol, and isomalt)

FODMAP’s are sugars – the carbohydrates – in foods eaten and are poorly absorbed by the GI system.  The intestinal bacteria in the gut can react negatively to these types of foods and cause abdominal bloating, accompanied by gas,  developing pain and even diarrhea and/or constipation.

When foods high in FODMAP are eliminated from the daily diet of patients diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), patients begin to witness a decline in the negative GI (gastrointestinal) symptoms.  By reducing the intake of FODMAP foods may also help reduce GI symptoms for patients diagnosed with Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis (UC) or Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

  • Please Note:  Before changing diets, always speak to the healthcare professional/s monitoring and treating any/all gastrointestinal symptoms.

What foods contain FODMAP’s ?

Here is a partial listing of food high in FODMAP:

  • Fructans and Galactans/GOS:  Wheat, Rye, Barley, Onion, Garlic, Inulin/Chicory root, Most Legumes (bean sources), Artichoke, Soy Milk, Rice Milk, Coconut Milk.
  • Lactose:  Milk, Yogurt, Ice Cream, Soft Cheeses such as Ricotta and Cottage Cheese.
  • Fructose: A major ingredient in many processed foods is High Fructose Corn Syrup, Honey, Agave, and Fruits such as Applies, Pears, and Watermelon.
  • Polyols:  Mushrooms, Cauliflower, Sugar-Free Gum and Candy, and a few fruits such as Peaches, Plums, and Cherries.

Here is a partial listing of foods that are allowed when following a FODMAP Diet:

  • Grains:  Rice, Oats, Gluten-Free Pasta, Breads, and Cereals.
  • Fruites: Oranges, Bananas, Grapes, Honeydew Melon, Cantaloupe Melon, Kiwi, Pineapple and Berries except blackberries.
  • Vegetables:  Carrots, Eggplant, Zucchini, Peppers, Green Beans, Lettuce, Cucumber, Potato, and Tomatoes to name a few.
  • Protein:  Chicken, Turkey, Fish, Eggs, Beef, Pork, Tofu, Nut Butters.
  • Dairy: Lactose FREE Milk products, If there is not a nut allergy then proceed to Nut Milks such as Almond and Cashew Milk, Lactose Free Yogurt, Hard Cheese like Chedder and Feta.

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Registered Dietitians (RD) with expertise and familiar with this diet help patients live better with any gastrointestinal diagnosis successfully.

Please note: This diet is a two step diet and consists of the elimination process and then the reintroduction of foods back into the diet.

The support and guidance gained by patients working directly with a RD will find this diet less restricting and experience the alleviation of negative symptoms caused by many food items.

The role of a RD is to guide patients and their families to eating nutritious foods and to assist in creating healthy, enjoyable meals that will promote a healthy GI system and reduce the symptoms.

To learn more about Registered Dietitians please take a moment to click on the link below to view a short video and gain a better understanding of the important role a RD provides in promoting well being and improving patient care in the healthcare system.

https://cdifffoundation.org/2013/07/18/what-a-registered-dietitian-can-do-for-you/

Karen Factor, RD is the Chairperson of Nutrition and Wellness Committee
of the C Diff Foundation and is available through the  C.diff. Support Sessions offered each month.  Register for a FREE support session with Karen by clicking on the following link:

https://cdifffoundation.org/cdiffsupport/

 

 

Resources: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Global C. difficile Congress – Eight Sessions In Four Hours Webinar – A Half Day To Change the C. difficile World

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Raising global awareness with leading international topic experts have proven to be effective over the years with audiences attending our annual conferences.

 

The Global C. difficile Congress took place on November 11th, 2016 and broadened existing knowledge surrounding C. difficile infection (CDI)  prevention, treatments, research, and environmental safety worldwide.

The drive and passion takes us forward in promoting the practical and technical advancements taking place across the globe.  Healthcare Professionals from every area of expertise, discussed the control and  treatment options,  the healthcare perspectives, antibiotic-resistance stewardship programs, and much more to raise C. diff. awareness and share successful implementations and guidelines.

This free webinar is available to you and with the ease of learning without having to travel.

The Global C. difficile Congress  —  eight sessions presented by topic experts  – in four hours – in one day –  with goals to change the C. difficile world with a common focus; To
improve awareness of C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, research, and environmental safety in the healthcare communities worldwide.

 

https://recordings.join.me/ezyFo7graka6cXR8nmjkoQ

 

Guest Speakers and Program Topics

USA    ET                         UK TIME               GUEST SPEAKER

8:00 – 8:15 a.m.            1:00 – 1:15 p.m.       Paul Feuerstadt, MD

Dr. Paul Feuerstadt; Native of Long Island, New York, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology, with distinction in research and graduated Summa Cum Laude. Following completion of his undergraduate training, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan, New York where he earned his Medical Doctor degree and stayed at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell medical center for his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Following completion of his residency
Dr. Feuerstadt then moved on to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY for his clinical fellowship training.His areas of interest include ischemic diseases of the gut and chronic diarrheal syndromes with a specific focus on C.diff. infections.Dr. Feuerstadt is affiliated with St. Raphael campus of Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale-New Haven Hospital and
Milford Hospital seeing outpatients in his offices in Hamden and Milford, CT
Topic: Welcome – Introduction

8:15 – 8:45 a.m.            1:15 – 1:45               Jean de Gunzburg, PhD

Dr. de Gunzburg is Chief Scientific Officer of Da Volterra, an emerging biotechnology company, headquartered in Paris, France.  Prior to this, Jean de Gunzburg led an academic research career in molecular and cell biology at the Institut Pasteur (Paris, France), the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (Cambridge, MA, USA) and the Institut Curie (Paris, France). He is the author of over 70 publications in international peer reviewed scientific journals, and continues to serve on several grant review committees.
Topic: “DAV132, A  Novel Product Destined To Prevent Antibiotic-Induced
Clostridium difficile Infections.”

8:45 – 9:15                   1:45 – 2:15                Arjun Srinivasan, MD

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan is the Associate Director for healthcare-associated infection (HAI) prevention programs in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Dr. Srinivasan is also a captain in the US Public Health Service. An infectious disease doctor, Dr. Srinivasan oversees several CDC programs aimed at eliminating healthcare-associated infections and improving antibiotic use. For much of his CDC career, Dr. Srinivasan ran the healthcare outbreak investigation unit, helping hospitals and other healthcare facilities track down bacteria and stop them from infecting other patients. Dr. Srinivasan leads the CDC’s work to improve antibiotic prescribing and works with a team of CDC experts researching new strategies.
Topic: Antibiotic Stewardship- Improving Antibiotic Use to Combat C diff.”

9:15 – 9:45                   2:15 – 2:45               Clifford McDonald, MD

Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School. He completed a medical microbiology fellowship at Duke University and is a former member of CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. Dr. McDonald is currently the Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC. He has first authored or co-authored over 100 peer reviewed publications on subjects related to healthcare and infectious disease epidemiology Dr. McDonald joins fellow world-renowned topic experts to discuss the burden of C. difficile infections with the risk factors pertaining to current and emerging treatment options along with the importance of applying evidence-based clinical approaches to the prevention of  a C. difficile infection (CDI), one of the leading community and healthcare-associated infections.
Topic: “Challenges and Opportunities Posed by Current Diagnostics
for Clostridium difficile Infection”

9:45 – 10:15                 2:45 – 3:15               Barley Chironda,, RPN, CIC

Barley Chironda a Nurse, National Healthcare Sales Director and Infection Control Specialist Clorox Canada, Social Media Manager of IPAC Canada,  and the current President of IPAC- GTA.    Mr. Chironda is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC™) and has worked extensively in Infection Control.  He is typically found engaged in motivating hospital staff, patients and the public on proper infection prevention practices.   Mr. Chironda’s roles allow great participation in quality improvement interventions related to patient and public safety. Therefore Barley has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral change.
Topic:  “The C.diff.. Disinfection Debate: To Use
Or Not To Use Sporicidal Disinfectants Every-Time In Healthcare Facilities.”

10:15 -10:45                 3:15 – 3:45              Dale Gerding, MD

Dr. Dale Gerding,  Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Maywod, Illinois and Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Prior to his present position Dr. Gerding was Chief of Medicine at VA Chicago, Lakeside Division, and Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.  He is an infectious diseases specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA.  He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past Chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of IDSA from 2005-2008. He is a Master of the American College of Physicians and the 2013 recipient of the William Middleton Award, the highest research award given by the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology, and is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of  Clostridium difficile disease, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.  He has been a Merit Review funded research investigator in the VA for over 40 years and is the author of over 400 peer-reviewed journal publications, book chapters, and review articles.  He holds patents for the use of non-toxigenic C. difficile for the prevention and treatment of this disease.
Topic: “Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile for Prevention of CDI”

10:45 – 11:15               3:45 – 4:15               Richard Vickers, PhD

Dr. Richard Vickers is the Chief Scientific Officer, Antimicrobials and Programme Lead for CDI,
Summit Therapeutics.  He joined Summit in 2003 and during his time has worked in a variety of roles involved in the development and management of various antibacterial therapeutic programs.  This includes leading the discovery and development of ridinilazole, the investigational antibiotic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Prior to joining Summit, Dr Vickers undertook postdoctoral research studies with Professor Stephen Davies at the University of Oxford and held a Stipendiary Lectureship in organic chemistry at St. Catherine’s College in Oxford. Dr Vickers received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Reading and a B.Sc. in chemistry from King’s College London.
Topic: “Ridinilazole; A Selective Therapy for the Treatment
of C. difficile Infections (CDI)”

11:15 – 11:45               4:15 – 4:45               Simon Cutting, PhD

Professor Cutting of Molecular Microbiology at Royal Holloway, University of London is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His D.Phil was on understanding the genetic control of spore formation in Bacillus Clostridium difficile.. His other expertise is in the use of Bacillus spores as probiotics and has a number of contracts and consultancies with European and US companies in the food and feed sectors.
Topic: “Thwarting the Opportunist: An Anti-adhesion
Vaccine That Prevents C.difficult Colonization.”

11:45 – 12:15               4:45 – 5:15               Hudson Garrett, Jr, PhD

Dr. Garrett is currently employed as the Global Chief Clinical Officer for Pentax Medical. He holds a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular access, moderate sedation, infection prevention, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.
Topic:  “Improving Patient Safety and Reducing Clostridium difficile
through Collaboration with Clinical Nursing and Environmental Services Professionals”

 

For more information please visit the Global C. difficile Congress

http://www.globalcdifficilecongress.org

 

Learn More About The Signs and Symptoms Of Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

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Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

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“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

SepsisCDCBannerHealthcareMatters

According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

 

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C Diff Foundation’s Volunteer Patient Advocates Promote Their Summer of 2016 Schedule Of Events “Raising C. diff. Awareness™”

VOLUNTEER PT ADVOCATES

C Diff Foundation’s Volunteer Patient Advocates; Heather Clark and Kimberly Reilly

will be “Raising C. diff. Awareness ™”  at the following events over the Summer of 2016.

 ~ Save the dates ~ 

Lycoming County Fair
1 E. Park St, Hughesville, PA 17737
Saturday, July 16 and Saturday, July 23, 2016
10 am to 10 pm

Hart-Parr Oliver Collectors Association National Summer Show
(This is the national tractor show where their Father’s tractor will be on display)
3349 Gehan Road, Canandaigua, NY 14424
Friday, August 12, 2016
* See us in the flea market section of the event; there will be acres of flea market displays
Hours not set, but we will be there all day

Wyoming County Fair
Route 6, Meshoppen, PA 18629
Saturday, September 3, 2016
10 am to 10 pm

 

Stop by their booths to learn more about C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide.

For additional information please
contact the C Diff Foundation office:  1-919-201-1512

C Diff Foundation Is Approved For Google Ad Grant To Promote Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Prevention, Treatments, Environmental Safety, And Support Worldwide

 

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The C Diff Foundation announces that it has been approved  for a Google Ad Grant equivalent to about USD 10,000 per month .  Google offers organizations free access to Google tools like Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive, Google Ad Grants,

“Nearly half a million Americans suffer from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year. With annual fatalities close to 29,000 a year, it’s a global problem that affects every community,” explains Nancy Caralla, Executive Director and Foundress of the
C Diff Foundation. “With the support of companies like Google, we can further raise C. diff. awareness, provide information and support  and save lives worldwide.”

We’ are truly appreciative to have Google Ad Grants as part of the C Diff Foundation’s  C. diff. educational and advocacy  program and we are confident that the AdWords Grant will help the C Diff Foundation deliver additional support to patients, their families, and healthcare professionals worldwide.

With the Google Ad Grant the C Diff Foundation is able to help raise C. diff. awareness through education about research being conducted by the government, industry, and academia; and better advocacy on behalf of patients, healthcare professionals, and researchers worldwide working to address the public health threat posed by this devastating infection.

About the C Diff Foundation:
The C Diff Foundation is a leading nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, established in 2012 and dedicated at supporting public health through education and advocating for C. difficile infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide. The Foundation’s founder is a Nurse and after suffering through C. difficile infections herself and witnessing the loss of her father, whose life was claimed by C. difficile involvement, the
C Diff Foundation came to fruition.

The C Diff Foundation, with their Volunteer Patient Advocates, successfully “Raise C. diff. Awareness” nationwide and in 38 countries, and host a Nationwide information Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) which also supports health care providers and patients to manage through the difficulties of a C. diff. infection.

 

Twitter:          @cdiffFoundation   #cdiff2016

Face Book:   https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio