Tag Archives: C diff Global Community Support

Thanksgiving Reflections With Gratitude – 2017

Dear Members, Followers, and Visitors,

It’s hard to believe another  year has caught up with us and here we are preparing for the Thanksgiving holiday and reflecting upon the days that have passed by in 2017.

 

During this year we have been expanding across  the globe and reaching far away lands
meeting great people like you who are devoted to “Promoting C. diff. Awareness” with
the C Diff Foundation.

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We want to extend our gratitude to you and everyone for the warm welcome this past
year.  In our travels, and communication we get to discover many organizations doing outstanding work.

Each organization dedicated in researching and developing new avenues to prevent and treat a Clostridium difficile infection are all successful, appreciated, and applauded by the patients and their families who are being treated and recovering from a          C. difficile infection.

The C Diff Foundation is an exceptional organization, and its special ingredients
are what makes us so proud to be a part. The first of these is our outreach programs. We offer patients and their families opportunities worldwide to gain support and information which is vital during a C. diff. infection and during the recovery phase of this infection.

The second special ingredient is the dedicated volunteering staff here in the USA,  most of whom have been faithfully serving our Foundation since the formation in 2012.

The third special ingredient is you and all the Volunteer Advocates worldwide with the financial supporters who see to it that our mission continues promoting  “C. difficile Awareness” with the many programs in place to make you and your communities stronger than ever in C. diff. infection prevention, treatment information, support, and environmental safety products available.

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As we work together today and in the coming  year, seeking opportunities to bring hearts to a mend through the C. diff. Global Community Support Program, we look forward to speak with you by phone via: Teleconferencing sessions or in person at a local event.  Sessions are scheduled each month and available throughout the US and accessible from 57 countries right now.  Register through the website support page or call us (919) 201-1512 and register for upcoming sessions.  It will be our pleasure to speak with you about C. diff. infections, financial support, pharmaceutical information, group discussions related to anxiety and depression, nutrition, and sessions speaking with others that truly understand the diagnosis and ways to work through it.

We encourage you to introduce others to the C Diff Foundation and to the validated information provided.

As we come together with friends, family, and strangers~  let us reflect on our own thoughts and reflections of gratitude and let us light a candle to signify “hope” – the shining light that we see in the shadows when turmoil and struggles occur.

The days may becoming shorter during the winter months on the horizon but our light of “hope” for better health and stronger days has never shown brighter than today.

 

 

 

 

We especially wish to thank the many USA Governors for signing State Proclamations declaring “November Clostridium difficile Infection Awareness Month.”

The gratitude expressed by the patients and their families is overwhelming and the health care professionals around the globe hold this statement in the highest regards.

“We are thankful!”

We are all truly grateful for the opportunity to work with dedicated volunteers, healthcare professionals, scientific researchers, and associates from so many worthy organizations.

Thank you for all that you do for others, for their communities – and partnering with the C Diff Foundation in  our mission of educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and support worldwide!

Gut Health and Nutrition

Your digestive, or gastrointestinal (GI), tract is a long, muscular tube that runs from your mouth to your anus. It’s about 30 feet long and works with other parts of your digestive system to break food and drink down into smaller molecules of nutrients. The blood absorbs these and carries them throughout the body for cells to use for energy, growth, and repair.

With such a long GI highway, it’s common to run into bumps in the road. About 60 to 70 million Americans are affected by digestive diseases, like gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). GERD happens when your stomach acid and/or contents come back up into your esophagus (swallowing tube) or throat. This causes uncomfortable symptoms like heartburn and indigestion. IBS is a group of symptoms that includes pain in the abdomen and changes in bowel habits. People with IBS may have constipation, diarrhea, or both. Many more people have other digestive problems, like bloating and stomach pain.

“There are many factors that can impact gut health,” says Dr. Lin Chang, a GI expert at the University of California, Los Angeles. How your body’s built, your family and genetic history, how you manage stress, and what you eat can all affect your gut.

“I see a lot of lifestyle-related GI issues, and there are often no quick fixes for that,” she says. “In general, people do well when they create a more routine schedule, eat a healthy diet and smaller more frequent meals, add in some exercise, and get a good amount of sleep.”

Chang studies the connection between stress and IBS. Her research group has found that people who have early life stress are more likely to develop IBS. “However, this increased risk for IBS went down when people confided in someone they trust about the stress they experienced,” she explains. “Finding healthy ways to manage stress is important for GI health, and your health overall.”

What you eat can help or hurt your digestive system, and influence how you feel. “Increasing fiber is really important for constipation,” says Chang. “Most Americans do not eat a lot of fiber so you have to gradually increase the fiber in your diet. Otherwise you might get gas and more bloating, and won’t stick with [the changes].”

Chang says you should eat at least 20–30 grams of fiber a day for constipation. You can spread out your fiber in small amounts throughout the day. Start with small servings and gradually increase them to avoid gas, bloating, and discomfort.

Try to eat fruits and vegetables at every meal * cooked well for post-C.diff. infection patients until tolerated.

A variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains can provide a healthy mix of different fibers and nutrients to your diet. An added benefit is that the more fiber and whole foods you eat, the less room you’ll have for less healthy options.

But some fiber-rich foods, called high FODMAP foods, can be hard to digest. Examples include certain fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and wheat and rye products.

If you have IBS, your doctor may recommend a diet low in FODMAPS.

Researchers are coming to understand the complex community of bacteria and other microbes that live in the human GI tract. Called gut flora or microbiota, these microbes help with our digestion.

But evidence has been growing that gut microbes may influence our health in other ways too. Studies suggest that they may play roles in obesity, type 2 diabetes, IBS, and colon cancer. They might also affect how the immune system functions. T

his can affect how your body fights illness and disease.

Recent studies have found that microbes’ effects on the immune system may impact the development of conditions such as allergy, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis.

You might have heard that probiotics—live microbes that are similar to those found in the human gut—can improve your gut health. These are also called “friendly bacteria” or “good bacteria.” Probiotics are available in dietary supplements and in certain foods, such as yogurt.

There is some evidence that probiotics may be helpful in preventing diarrhea associated with antibiotics and improving symptoms of IBS, but more needs to be learned.

Researchers still don’t know which probiotics are helpful and which aren’t. They also don’t know how much of the probiotics people would have to take or who would most likely benefit from them.

Certain food additives called emulsifiers are something else that may affect your gut health. Emulsifiers are added to many processed foods to improve texture and extend shelf life. But studies show they can affect our gut flora.

“Our work and other research indicate that emulsifiers and other food additives can negatively impact the microbiota and promote inflammatory diseases,” says Georgia State University’s Dr. Andrew Gewirtz. His group has been studying the relationships between food additives, gut bacteria, and disease in mice. The team also plans to examine how different food additives may affect people.

Based on what his team and others have found, Gewirtz advises, “The take home message: Eat a balanced diet and less processed foods.”

“The GI system is complicated and such an important part of our health,” Chang says. “It takes a real partnership between patient and doctor to get to the root of issues. Everyone has to find a healthy routine that works for them.”

She encourages you to take an active role in finding a doctor who makes you feel comfortable. The right doctor will listen carefully to your health history and symptoms. You can help keep your gut in check by talking with your doctor and—together—making the right choices for you.

To Learn More About FODMAP, Probiotics, Prebiotics, C. difficile and post-C.difficile nutrition

join Karen Factor, RD every 3rd Thursday each month for free sessions.  Sign up today through

the website:  https://cdifffoundation.org/cdiffsupport/

To read this article in its entirety click on the following link:

https://newsinhealth.nih.gov/issue/May2017/Feature1

References
Adverse childhood experiences are associated with irritable bowel syndrome and gastrointestinal symptom severity. Park SH, Videlock EJ, Shih W, Presson AP, Mayer EA, Chang L. Neurogastroenterology & Motility. 2016 Aug;28(8):1252-60. doi: 10.1111/nmo.12826. Epub 2016 Apr 8. PMID: 27061107.

Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome. Chassaing B, Koren O, Goodrich JK, Poole AC, Srinivasan S, Ley RE, Gewirtz AT. Nature. 2015 Mar 5;519(7541):92-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14232. Epub 2015 Feb 25. PMID: 25731162.

Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota? Evolutionary pressures and potential mechanisms. Alcock J, Maley CC, Aktipis CA. Bioessays. 2014 Oct;36(10):940-9. doi: 10.1002/bies.201400071. Epub 2014 Aug 8. PMID: 25103109.

Understanding IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) With Guests Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD and Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD On C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network

Broadcast Live On Tuesday, May 3rd

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015
To access the Podcast Library
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
please click on the logo above *


C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This episode——    “Understanding IBS”

With Our Guests:

Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD,

and

Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD, FACG

This episode of “C. diff. Spores and More” is focused on “What is IBS?” So you’ve been diagnosed with IBS (Irritable Bowel Sydrome). Now what? Join us for a discussion about the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of the various forms of IBS with our special guests: Dr. Caterina Oneto,, MD and Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD, Both professors and physicians specializing in Gastroenterology with a wealth of knowledge and experience treating patients diagnosed with a CDI and through ongoing scientific/medical research.

 

MORE ABOUT OUR GUESTS:

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Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD

Dr. Caterina Oneto is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the NYU Division of Gastroenterology, Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine.
Fluent in Spanish, she graduated with a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the Universidad de Valparaiso in Chile. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Cabrini Medical Center, where she served also as Chief Resident, and later completed her Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
With expertise in endoscopy, colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, liver and pancreatic diseases, Dr. Oneto’s special interests include IBD (Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), microbiota modification, treatment of Clostridium Difficile and FMT (Fecal Microbiota Transplantation).

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Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD

A native of Long Island, New York, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology, with distinction in research and graduated Summa Cum Laude. Following completion of his undergraduate training, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan, New York where he earned his Medical Doctor degree and stayed at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell medical center for his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Following completion of his residency Dr. Feuerstadt then moved on to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY for his clinical fellowship training.His areas of interest include ischemic diseases of the gut and chronic diarrheal syndromes with a specific focus on C.diff. infections.Dr. Feuerstadt is affiliated with St. Raphael campus of Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale-New Haven Hospital and Milford Hospital seeing outpatients in his offices in Hamden and Milford, CT

Both Dr. Oneto and Dr. Feuerstadt  preside as Medical Advocates
for the C. diff. Global Community Support Program.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

 

Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™  is made possible through our official  Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

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A World of Thanks To the C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates Around the Globe

National Volunteers Week     #NVW2016

 

Did you know that it is  NATIONAL VOLUNTEER WEEK
April 10-16, 2016

President Richard Nixon established National Volunteer Week with an executive order in 1974, as a way to recognize and celebrate the efforts of volunteers. Every sitting U.S. president since Nixon has issued a proclamation during National Volunteer Week (as have many U.S. mayors and governors).  Since then, the original emphasis on celebration has widened; the week has become a nationwide effort to urge people to get out and volunteer in their communities.

To each C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate, , on behalf of all the staff and the thousands of members around the globe we want to say THANK YOU!

Your continued support and efforts contribute in a significant way to our mission of educating, and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety awareness worldwide.

November marked our third  year in “Raising C. diff. infection Awareness” campaign and we thank the many organizations who supported and contributed by sharing information with others.  We are all working toward a shared goal in witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases and “None of us can do this alone…..all of us can do this TOGETHER!”

We celebrate our volunteers and this week stands as a reminder that our daily work sharing information, educating, and advocating for C. diff. infections, remains not only critical but it is urgent.

We do not know when new interventions to prevent, to treat, and protect our environments with products that will  eradicate C. diff. spores will become available to the public.  The good news is that we do know that there are many positive interventions presently in clinical trials, which give us all HOPE.

Visit the website for updates and feel free to inquire if you or a loved one would be considered a candidate to participate in an ongoing clinical trial:

 https://cdifffoundation.org/clinical-trials-2/

This is why acts of sharing the C Diff Foundation literature during every opportunity quickly opens doors of knowledge helping others learn how to prevent acquiring this painful and life-threatening infection, treatments available, and disinfecting products with EPA Registered C. diff. kill for environmental safety–  to  help save lives.

Reminder that there is always information and support  available and  only a phone call away 1-844-FOR-CDIF

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates build awareness, help build support and provide education of C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety measures  to patients, survivors  their families and community healthcare professional centers/offices.  They also  guide individuals in giving a voice to patients, survivors and their families on healthcare-related infections, informing the public,  health-care providers (hospitals, healthcare professionals, etc.), organizations of health-care professionals, the educational world, with the medical, Governmental agencies, and pharmaceutical research communities.

We provide our Volunteer Patient Advocates with the necessary tools, and updates to generate positive results.

Do you have a few extra minutes to share vital information with others to raise C diff. infection awareness in your community?

By becoming a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate you will make a BIG difference and help spare others the pain, suffering, and tragedy of loosing a loved one that is caused by a C. diff. infection.

Contact our office for additional information and register today by e-mailing the C Diff Foundation your name and a valid mailing address to receive an official  C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate Packet

info@cdifffoundation.org

On this day, and throughout the year ahead, we want you to be confident that your Volunteer Membership in the Foundation is bringing important information out into the communities and throughout the world through the educational brochures, cards, letters, and from sharing your own personal experiences with others.  Please be sure to share your journey with others in need of “HOPE” on the C. diff. Survivors Alliance Network website  http://www.cdiffsurvivors.org

Your continued donations received during the year are always appreciated. Your gifts assist the Foundation in promoting C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety education, and advocacy to healthcare professionals, families, patients, and communities world-wide.  We are grateful for your assistance, dedication, and support and we hope the Foundation has also been helpful to you.  If you have any suggestions about how we can serve others better or share the information more effectively, please let us know.  You are welcome to email, telephone, or write to the Foundation at any time.

We certainly look forward to your continued Volunteer Membership in the Foundation.  There is so much more that needs to be accomplished and we continue to move forward together promoting our mission, which is entirely dedicated for the good of others.

May you and your families experience continued HOPE for good health, happiness, and peace throughout the year.

Thank You for helping prevent further pain and suffering worldwide by sharing in the

C Diff Foundation’s mission today.

 

The C Diff Foundation Offers Patients, Family Members, and Clinicians Global Community Support

We are pleased to announce the

C. diff. Global Community Support Program —   an extension of  our

existing patient program – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program.

Our Foundation Members and Medical Advocates, leading the support groups, via: teleconferencing, will now have the ability to offer support to patients, families, clinicians, and individuals seeking support —  in  the U.S. and 57 countries.

Below you will find the list of countries, with their local cities,  able
to participate in our teleconferencing support groups:

Argentina – Buenos Aires and Cordoba
Australia – Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney
Austria – Countrywide, Vienna
Bahrain – Countrywide
Belgium – Brussels
Brazil – Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
Bulgaria – Sofia
Canada – Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Toronto,
Vancouver, Winnipeg.
Chile – Santiago
China – Beijing
Columbia – Bogota
Costa Rica – National VolP
Croatia – Zagreb
Cyprus – Nicosia
Czech Republic – Prague
Denmark – Countrywide
Dominican Republic – Santo Domingo
El Salvador – San Salvador
Finland – Helsinki
France – Marseille, Paris
Germany – Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich
Greece – Athens
Hong Kong – Countrywide
Hungary – Budapest
India – Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai
Ireland – Dublin, National VolP
Israel – Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
Italy – Milan, Rome
Japan – Tokyo
Latvia- Riga
Lithuania – Vilnius
Luxembourg – Countrywide
Malaysia – Kuala Lumpur
Malta – Countrywide
Mexico – Guadalajara, Mexico City, Monterrey
Netherlands – Amsterdam
New Zealand – Auckland
Norway – Oslo
Panama – Panama City
Peru – Lima
Poland – Warsaw
Portugal – Countrywide
Puerto Rico – Aguadilla
Romania – Bucharest
Russia – Moscow
Singapore – Singapore
Slovakia – Bratislava
Slovenia – Ljubljana
South Africa – Cape Town, Johannesburg
South Korea – Seoul
Spain – Barcelona, Madrid
Sweden – Malmo, Stockholm
Switzerland – Bern, Geneva, Zurich
Turkey – Istanbul
Ukraine – National VolP
United Kingdom – Birmingham, Edinburgh, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, National.
Venezuela – Caracas

Registration will remain the same – through the main number (919) 201-1512
or utilizing the nationwide U.S. Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF, or from the Foundation website
http://www.cdifffoundation.org C. diff. Global Community Support page.

Support is only a phone call away worldwide

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