Tag Archives: Dr Hudson Garrett Jr

Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

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C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network
will host a special episode on their live radio program (cdiffradio.com)
airing on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 1:00 pm EST featuring world-renowned
infectious disease expert, Dr. Hudson Garrett Jr., Global Chief Clinical Officer for Pentax Medical-Hoya Corporation and Chairperson of the Clinical Education Committee
for the C Diff Foundation.

This special episode, Bridging Collaboration Between Patients and Healthcare Providers to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections (HAI’s),  will feature a robust discussion on the patient’s role in preventing healthcare associated infections, an overview of medical device hygiene and infection control, the importance of antibiotic stewardship, and applications of evidence-based infection control measures across the entire healthcare continuum of care.

“Healthcare continues to become more and more complex as the acuity and needs of the patient changes along with the correlating technologies. Patients and Healthcare Providers must work together to mitigate the risk for Healthcare Associated Infections and other adverse events,” says Dr. Garrett.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through the interviews, the C Diff Foundation’s mission connects, educates, and empowers listeners worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

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Clorox Healthcare, Sponsor of C. diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network

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Antibiotic Resistance IS A Serious Global Health Concern

C.diff. Treatments

A Nevada woman has died from an infection resistant to all available antibiotics in the United States, public health officials report.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the woman’s condition was deemed incurable after being tested against 26 different antibiotics.

Though this isn’t the first case of pan-resistant bacteria in the U.S., at this time it is still uncommon. Still, experts note that antibiotic resistance is a growing health concern globally and call the newly reported case “a wake up call.”

“This is the latest reminder that yes, antibiotic resistance is real,” Dr. James Johnson, a professor specializing in infectious diseases at the University of Minnesota Medical School, told CBS News. “This is not some future, fantasized armageddon threat that maybe will happen after our lifetime. This is now, it’s real, and it’s here.”

According to the report, the woman from Washoe County was in her 70s and had recently returned to America after an extended trip to India. She had been hospitalized there several times before being admitted to an acute care hospital in Nevada in mid-August.

Doctors discovered the woman was infected with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), which is a family of germs that CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden has called “nightmare bacteria” due to the danger it poses for spreading antibiotic resistance.

The woman had a specific type of CRE, called Klebsiella pneumoniae, which can lead to a number of illnesses, including pneumonia, blood stream infections, and meningitis. In early September, she developed septic shock and died.

The authors of the report say the case highlights the need for doctors and hospitals to ask incoming patients about recent travel and if they have been hospitalized elsewhere.

Other experts say it underscores the need for the medical community, the government and the public to take antibiotic resistance more seriously.

According to the CDC, at least two million people become infected with antibiotic resistant bacteria each year, and at least 23,000 die as a direct result of these infections.

The World Health Organization calls antibiotic resistance “one of the biggest threats to global health.”

A grim report released last year suggests that if bacteria keep evolving at the current rate, by 2050, superbugs will kill 10 million people a year.

While scientists are working to develop new antibiotics, that takes time, and experts encourage doctors and the public to focus on prevention efforts.

One of the most important ways to prevent antibiotic resistance is to only take antibiotics only when they’re necessary.

“Drug resistance like this [case] generally develops from too much exposure to antibiotics,” assistant professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, told CBS News. “Every time you’re placed on an antibiotic it’s important to question if it’s absolutely necessary and what’s the shortest amount of time you can take this antibiotic for it to still be effective.”

Johnson notes that medical tourism – the practice of traveling to another country to obtain medical treatment, typically at lower cost – may no longer be worth the risk. “With this [antibiotic] resistance issue, the risk/benefit of this approach really changes and I think that people really need to be aware and seriously consider if it’s a good idea given the possibility of this kind of thing,” he said.

Frequent hand washing, particularly in healthcare settings, is also extremely important in preventing the spread of germs.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected:

http://www.lasvegasnow.com/news/nevada-woman-died-from-superbug-resistant-to-all-available-antibiotics-in-us/640548775

Global C. difficile Congress – Eight Sessions In Four Hours Webinar – A Half Day To Change the C. difficile World

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Raising global awareness with leading international topic experts have proven to be effective over the years with audiences attending our annual conferences.

 

The Global C. difficile Congress took place on November 11th, 2016 and broadened existing knowledge surrounding C. difficile infection (CDI)  prevention, treatments, research, and environmental safety worldwide.

The drive and passion takes us forward in promoting the practical and technical advancements taking place across the globe.  Healthcare Professionals from every area of expertise, discussed the control and  treatment options,  the healthcare perspectives, antibiotic-resistance stewardship programs, and much more to raise C. diff. awareness and share successful implementations and guidelines.

This free webinar is available to you and with the ease of learning without having to travel.

The Global C. difficile Congress  —  eight sessions presented by topic experts  – in four hours – in one day –  with goals to change the C. difficile world with a common focus; To
improve awareness of C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, research, and environmental safety in the healthcare communities worldwide.

 

https://recordings.join.me/ezyFo7graka6cXR8nmjkoQ

 

Guest Speakers and Program Topics

USA    ET                         UK TIME               GUEST SPEAKER

8:00 – 8:15 a.m.            1:00 – 1:15 p.m.       Paul Feuerstadt, MD

Dr. Paul Feuerstadt; Native of Long Island, New York, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology, with distinction in research and graduated Summa Cum Laude. Following completion of his undergraduate training, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan, New York where he earned his Medical Doctor degree and stayed at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell medical center for his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Following completion of his residency
Dr. Feuerstadt then moved on to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY for his clinical fellowship training.His areas of interest include ischemic diseases of the gut and chronic diarrheal syndromes with a specific focus on C.diff. infections.Dr. Feuerstadt is affiliated with St. Raphael campus of Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale-New Haven Hospital and
Milford Hospital seeing outpatients in his offices in Hamden and Milford, CT
Topic: Welcome – Introduction

8:15 – 8:45 a.m.            1:15 – 1:45               Jean de Gunzburg, PhD

Dr. de Gunzburg is Chief Scientific Officer of Da Volterra, an emerging biotechnology company, headquartered in Paris, France.  Prior to this, Jean de Gunzburg led an academic research career in molecular and cell biology at the Institut Pasteur (Paris, France), the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (Cambridge, MA, USA) and the Institut Curie (Paris, France). He is the author of over 70 publications in international peer reviewed scientific journals, and continues to serve on several grant review committees.
Topic: “DAV132, A  Novel Product Destined To Prevent Antibiotic-Induced
Clostridium difficile Infections.”

8:45 – 9:15                   1:45 – 2:15                Arjun Srinivasan, MD

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan is the Associate Director for healthcare-associated infection (HAI) prevention programs in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Dr. Srinivasan is also a captain in the US Public Health Service. An infectious disease doctor, Dr. Srinivasan oversees several CDC programs aimed at eliminating healthcare-associated infections and improving antibiotic use. For much of his CDC career, Dr. Srinivasan ran the healthcare outbreak investigation unit, helping hospitals and other healthcare facilities track down bacteria and stop them from infecting other patients. Dr. Srinivasan leads the CDC’s work to improve antibiotic prescribing and works with a team of CDC experts researching new strategies.
Topic: Antibiotic Stewardship- Improving Antibiotic Use to Combat C diff.”

9:15 – 9:45                   2:15 – 2:45               Clifford McDonald, MD

Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School. He completed a medical microbiology fellowship at Duke University and is a former member of CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. Dr. McDonald is currently the Associate Director for Science in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC. He has first authored or co-authored over 100 peer reviewed publications on subjects related to healthcare and infectious disease epidemiology Dr. McDonald joins fellow world-renowned topic experts to discuss the burden of C. difficile infections with the risk factors pertaining to current and emerging treatment options along with the importance of applying evidence-based clinical approaches to the prevention of  a C. difficile infection (CDI), one of the leading community and healthcare-associated infections.
Topic: “Challenges and Opportunities Posed by Current Diagnostics
for Clostridium difficile Infection”

9:45 – 10:15                 2:45 – 3:15               Barley Chironda,, RPN, CIC

Barley Chironda a Nurse, National Healthcare Sales Director and Infection Control Specialist Clorox Canada, Social Media Manager of IPAC Canada,  and the current President of IPAC- GTA.    Mr. Chironda is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC™) and has worked extensively in Infection Control.  He is typically found engaged in motivating hospital staff, patients and the public on proper infection prevention practices.   Mr. Chironda’s roles allow great participation in quality improvement interventions related to patient and public safety. Therefore Barley has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral change.
Topic:  “The C.diff.. Disinfection Debate: To Use
Or Not To Use Sporicidal Disinfectants Every-Time In Healthcare Facilities.”

10:15 -10:45                 3:15 – 3:45              Dale Gerding, MD

Dr. Dale Gerding,  Professor of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Maywod, Illinois and Research Physician at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital. Prior to his present position Dr. Gerding was Chief of Medicine at VA Chicago, Lakeside Division, and Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.  He is an infectious diseases specialist and hospital epidemiologist, past president of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and past chair the antibiotic resistance committee of SHEA.  He is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and past Chair of the National and Global Public Health Committee and the Antibiotic Resistance Subcommittee of IDSA. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of IDSA from 2005-2008. He is a Master of the American College of Physicians and the 2013 recipient of the William Middleton Award, the highest research award given by the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is a member of the American Society for Microbiology, and is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of  Clostridium difficile disease, antimicrobial resistance, and antimicrobial distribution and kinetics.  He has been a Merit Review funded research investigator in the VA for over 40 years and is the author of over 400 peer-reviewed journal publications, book chapters, and review articles.  He holds patents for the use of non-toxigenic C. difficile for the prevention and treatment of this disease.
Topic: “Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile for Prevention of CDI”

10:45 – 11:15               3:45 – 4:15               Richard Vickers, PhD

Dr. Richard Vickers is the Chief Scientific Officer, Antimicrobials and Programme Lead for CDI,
Summit Therapeutics.  He joined Summit in 2003 and during his time has worked in a variety of roles involved in the development and management of various antibacterial therapeutic programs.  This includes leading the discovery and development of ridinilazole, the investigational antibiotic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Prior to joining Summit, Dr Vickers undertook postdoctoral research studies with Professor Stephen Davies at the University of Oxford and held a Stipendiary Lectureship in organic chemistry at St. Catherine’s College in Oxford. Dr Vickers received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Reading and a B.Sc. in chemistry from King’s College London.
Topic: “Ridinilazole; A Selective Therapy for the Treatment
of C. difficile Infections (CDI)”

11:15 – 11:45               4:15 – 4:45               Simon Cutting, PhD

Professor Cutting of Molecular Microbiology at Royal Holloway, University of London is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His D.Phil was on understanding the genetic control of spore formation in Bacillus Clostridium difficile.. His other expertise is in the use of Bacillus spores as probiotics and has a number of contracts and consultancies with European and US companies in the food and feed sectors.
Topic: “Thwarting the Opportunist: An Anti-adhesion
Vaccine That Prevents C.difficult Colonization.”

11:45 – 12:15               4:45 – 5:15               Hudson Garrett, Jr, PhD

Dr. Garrett is currently employed as the Global Chief Clinical Officer for Pentax Medical. He holds a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular access, moderate sedation, infection prevention, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.
Topic:  “Improving Patient Safety and Reducing Clostridium difficile
through Collaboration with Clinical Nursing and Environmental Services Professionals”

 

For more information please visit the Global C. difficile Congress

http://www.globalcdifficilecongress.org

 

Highlights — 4th Annual International “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Conference — Boston

symposium

THE C DIFF FOUNDATION 

  4th ANNUAL

INTERNATIONAL RAISING C. diff. AWARENESS CONFERENCE

HIGHLIGHTS — PROMISE & CHALLENGES IN C. diff.  TREATMENT

Part 1: Novel Approaches and Therapies in Development

The Centers for Disease Control first recognized C. difficile infection (CDI) as an urgent threat to public health in September 2013. However, I first began to understand the impact on patients in 2008 when I was first diagnosed with Clostridium difficile (C. diff).  My journeys, including many months of illness (nine recurrent CDI) which  included a referral to hospice care before finally being correctly treated in 2009.  Henceforth; I was no stranger to this diagnosis with over two decades of  Nursing and witnessing the loss of my Father, whose life was claimed by C. difficile involvement in 2004.

C. diff.  has left me with serious health complications. Though I returned to my career as a Nurse for a brief time, I was diagnosed with an entirely new  C. diff infection in 2011– enduring  nine recurrences through the following year.  Another year  taken away from C. diff..

Like many other patients, the physical, financial and emotional toll has been great – not only on me, but also on my family.  Yet, through my  journeys and what I have learned in the process has inspired me to help others affected by C. diff.  and share with fellow healthcare professionals through educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.

I was proud to kick off the third annual International Raising C. diff Awareness Conference & Health EXPO in Cambridge, MA last fall.   The Annual Conference is one of many important initiatives the C Diff Foundation undertakes to build awareness, advance advocacy and support research to address the public health threat posed by this devastating, life-threatening  infection and common healthcare-associated infection.

Through the Conference–  the C Diff Foundation offers perspective from world renowned experts on C. difficile infection prevention, treatment and research, with discussions ranging from pharmaceutical options to environmental safety products.

♦ Here are the  highlights from our guest speakers ♦

Bezlotoxumab

Dr. Mary Beth Dorr, Director of Clinical Research, Infectious Diseases at Merck, presented the most recent data on the company’s C. diff antitoxin, bezlotoxumab. Nearest to potential FDA approval among new options for patients, bezlotoxumab would be used as an adjunct to standard antibiotic regimens for C. diff, with a goal of reducing recurrences—something for which no other drug has been approved.

Merck’s first trial, MODIFY 1 (Monoclonal Antibodies For C. DIFficile Therapy), included 1,412 patients globally. In addition to standard treatment of care, patients received a single intravenous infusion of either the antitoxin actoxumab (binds to the C. diff toxin A) or bezlotoxumab (binds to the C. diff toxin B) alone, or the two in combination, or a placebo.

This study called for a pre-specified interim analysis allowing for modifications in the trial after 40% of patients had completed a 12-week follow-up. As a result, actoxumab alone was dropped from further study as it did not provide added efficacy over bezlotoxumab alone or the combination of bezlotoxumab and actoxumab.

The MODIFY 2 trial evaluated an additional 1,163 patients who received standard antibiotic treatment for C. diff plus either bezlotoxumab alone, or the combination of bezlotoxumab and actoxumab, or placebo. The primary endpoint was prevention of a recurrence of C. diff infection at 12 weeks defined as a new episode of diarrhea and a positive stool test for toxigenic C. diff.

Many of the patients in the trial were quite ill: 17% had severe CDI, 18% had the more virulent PCR ribotype 027 strain, and about 20% were immunocompromised.

For the two studies overall, the rates of recurrent C. diff were significantly less in patients receiving bezlotoxumab alone than placebo (17% vs. 28%). Adverse events were no different in the treatment and placebo groups.

Because there was no benefit to the combination of the two antibodies, bezlotoxumab alone was selected for new drug applications submitted to the US FDA and European Medicines Agency seeking marketing approval.

Ecobiotics  — A Novel Approach To Recurrent CDI’s

Fecal microbial therapy, also referred to as FMT or stool transplants, generated much discussion. However; this therapeutic approach aiming to change the gut microbiome, the collection of bacteria and other microorganisms in and on our bodies, is being studied in clinical trials by two of the presenters.

Dr. David Cook, PhD, Executive Vice President of Research and Development and Chief Scientific Officer, Seres Therapeutics, spoke about “ecobiotic therapeutic restoration.” He noted that a dysbiotic, or imbalanced microbiome, is increasingly linked to multiple diseases including C. difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and metabolic diseases like diabetes mellitus.   ECOSPOR ™ is their current Phase 2 clinical study focused on the safety and efficacy of SER-109, a drug for the potential prevention of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in adults who have had three or more episode of CDI within the previous nine months.

In its Phase 2 study, Seres used spores from the Clostridiales group of organisms, treated to decrease the risk of any pathogen transmission. A small group of patients with > 3 prior CDIs were given two doses of a mixture of strains of spores by mouth and followed up for 8 weeks. In this study, 13 of 15 (87%) patients met the primary endpoint of no recurrent diarrhea associated with a positive test for C. diff.

Another study, using a slightly smaller dose of spores, had the same findings. Overall, 29 of 30 (97%) patients had clinical resolution of their diarrhea; the improvement persisted at 24 weeks. A slightly larger Phase 2 study is underway now and Phase 3 studies are planned for 2016. The drug has received breakthrough and orphan drug designations from the FDA. Seres’ drug also reduced carriage of or colonization by multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO), including Klebsiella, Providencia, and Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), all of which are recognized by the CDC as urgent or emerging health threats.

RBX2660  —  Therapeutic Microbiota Restoration

Dr. Lee Jones, Foundress and CEO of Rebiotix, presented ongoing studies with RBX2660. Their product, RBX2660, which also aims to restore a gut microbiome altered by CDI, has been designated a drug, rather than a tissue transplant, by the FDA and has received fast track, orphan drug, and breakthrough therapy designations. The liquid microbial suspension packaged for enema delivery is manufactured differently than fecal microbial transplants, and the end-product is standardized and ready for administration.

The initial Phase 2 study, PUNCH™, was open-label and included 30 patients with at least two recurrences of C. diff requiring hospitalization. With a 6-month follow-up period, this trial had an 87% efficacy rate and no recurrences. A second 120 patient randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial (PUNCH CD 2) is ongoing. Rebiotix is also developing an oral formulation and planning trials for other indications.

Vaccines

Approaches to vaccination were also discussed at the conference by the companies leading those research initiatives. Mucosal vaccination, to protect people from pathogens that enter or cause harm at the mucosal surface, or lining of our gastrointestinal or respiratory tracts, has been used in developing a variety of vaccines, including polio, typhoid, and experimental influenza vaccinations. Dr. Simon Cutting, PhD, Professor of Molecular Microbiology at
Royal Holloway, University of London
, explained the rationale behind this approach and reviewed supporting animal data. If approved, this vaccine would be administered orally.
These studies are still in early development.

Dr. Patricia Pietrobon, Associate Vice President, Research and Development, C. diff Program Leader at Sanofi Pasteur, presented an update on the company’s vaccine, H-030-012, which relies on injection of an inactivated whole toxin to both C. diff toxins A and B. Sanofi’s vaccine showed immunogenicity in patients in Phase 2 studies, and was the first vaccine to be awarded fast track approval by the FDA. Their vaccine showed an antibody response and immunologic boost after a dose at 6 months, suggesting vaccination might confer long-term protection from C. diff. A 15,000 participant, 5-year, global trial is underway, hoping to provide long-term immunity to C. diff.

Several other approaches for C. diff prevention and treatment were presented:
The first, described by Dr. Klaus Gottleib, MD, FACG, Vice President, Clinical Development and Regulatory Affairs, Synthetic Biologics, involves use of a beta-lactamase enzyme given orally in combination with a patient receiving a beta-lactam (penicillin or cephalosporin) antibiotic. The antibiotics would still have full efficacy in the blood or soft tissue, but the company’s hypothesis is that the enzyme will destroy unneeded antibiotic in the gut and will prevent
C. diff from developing by reducing alteration in the gut flora.
Their drug, SYN-004, is in Phase 2 trial development.

Dr. Martha Clokie, Ph.D.  Leicester UK, Professor in Microbiology.  Dr. Cloakie’s research focuses on phages that infect bacterial pathogens of medical relevance and  is focusing on  targeting  C. diff without altering the rest of the microbiome in preclinical studies. Hoping to destroy
C. diff with a biological warfare approach, she focuses on phages, tiny virus-like particles that infect bacteria.

Dr. Melanie Thompson, Ph.D.  is studying an older drug used for rheumatoid arthritis, auranofin, in Australia. Auranofin targets the selenium metabolism of C. diff, and is likely to be fairly specific treatment against that bacterium.

 

Part 2 – Challenges in Testing and Infection Management

 

Challenges

Testing

Among the key presentations, Dr. Mark Wilcox, MD, FRCPath, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, lead on Clostridium difficile for Public Health England, and Chairman of the conference, addressed the challenges of diagnosing C. diff..  From knowing who to test, to which test to employ, the state of testing poses challenges in accurately determining the number of CDI cases and in comparing rates over time or between locations.

He raised important questions for the medical community to address:

  •  Who should be tested?
  • Which tests should be used?
  • How do we measure accuracy between tests in order to compare infection rates over time and by location?

Dr. Wilcox showed data from the Euclid Study in Europe looking at approximately 4,000 stool samples submitted to participating hospital labs on a given day, whether or not a test for           C. diff. was ordered.  The data shows that about 25% of cases were missed by the hospitals, but were picked up by a centralized reference lab.  On a single day, 246 patients (6.3%) received an incorrect result from their hospital.  The translates to about 40,000 cases of CDI missed in Europe alone per year and underscoring that CDI is far more common, and commonly missed than appreciated, making it hard to grasp both the magnitude of the problem and the treat individual patients.

Barley Chironda, RPN, CIC, Manager of Infection Prevention and Medical Device Reprocessing at St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada also addressed the topic of testing in acknowledging that some physicians may also be reluctant to order C. diff. tests both because the tests can be hard to interpret, and because there may be perceived disincentives for detecting and reporting the infection .  Hospitals can be penalized financially for infections acquired in the hospital as well as receive lower quality of care ratings.

Antibiotic Stewardship

While there is confusion over how to test for C. diff. there is a general understanding as to what we must do to contain the epidemic — use fewer antibiotics.  Currently, up to 85% of patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) have received antibiotics in the 28 days before their CDI occurred.  More than 1/2 of all hospital patients receive an antibiotic, as do almost all surgical patients.  Estimates are that 30 – 50% of antibiotic use is unnecessary or inappropriate.

As Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, Vice President, Clinical Affairs, PDI, Nice-Pak, and Sani Professional, explained, education of both healthcare workers and patients is needed.  Prescribers need to limit antibiotic use to the most specific or narrowest spectrum antibiotic they can, and patients need to learn that antibiotics are not helpful for colds or viral infections.

If use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in hospitals is reduced by 30%, the CDC has estimated there will be 26% fewer CDI’s.  Garrett stressed the importance of good leadership and multidisciplinary approach to the success of an antibiotic stewardship program, emphasizing the need for engagement, education and involvement from the top administrators, physicians, pharmacists, and patients,

Another concern is the overuse of the class of antibiotics called quinolones.  An especially toxic and severe strain of C. diff. NAP2/027/B1 has been emerging, seemingly driven by the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics.  Quinolones are a widely prescribed class of antibiotics often used in treating pneumonia.

Limiting antibiotics and more appropriate use is not just for people — it is also important in agriculture.  There is a growing concern that contaminated products — both meat and                 produce — may transmit resistant organisms to people and spread C. diff. outside healthcare facilities.

Infection Control

Controlling the spread of  C. diff.  is a challenge.  While previously believed to be strictly a             healthcare-associated infection, recent findings show that many patients acquire C. diff. in the community.

As part of his presentation, “Behind the Scenes;  C. difficile Management in Health from the lens of an Infection Preventionist, ”  Barley Chronda, also reviewed infection control issues, focusing on the importance of cleaning.  He noted that 11% of occupants in a hospital room would acquire C. diff. if a prior patient had the infection.

The issues hospitals face include:

  •  A lack of dedicated equipment which may allow for the spread of C. diff. spores on items like stethoscopes and blood pressure cuffs;
  • Isolation for patients with diarrhea or incontinence with consideration for patient symptoms, hospital costs and appropriate patient care;
  • Lack of clarity re: responsibility for cleaning specific items, and what type of cleaning agent to use, as many products do not inactivate spores.  Clorox ® and UV-C Xenon, a high-energy, full spectrum ™ pulsed Xenon Ultraviolet Light by Xenex — both sponsors of the Conference, were addressed as options for CDI and a variety of multi-drug resistant organisms.
  • Hand-washing (Hand Hygiene) as many hospitals lack conveniently placed sinks and rely on alcohol hand sanitize gels and solutions,.  While alcohol is great for reducing most bacterial contamination, it is ineffective against C. diff. spores.

The Patient Journey Continues

Nancy Sheridan an Educator and  Volunteer Patient Advocate, represented the voice of the many patients who face the challenges of being diagnosed,  treated, and surviving a C. diff.  infection and shared her experience with the audience.  After developing diverticulitis complicated by a perforated colon following an overseas trip.  Nancy was treated with antibiotics and developed diarrhea.  Though doctors thought she might have a travel – related infection, she insisted on being tested for C. diff. and found C. diff. was causing her severe symptoms.  She suffered recurrent C. diff. infections, forcing her to take a leave of absence from her job.  In addition to the loss of income and mounting medical bills, she described feeling “defeated and broken.”

Desperate, housebound, in pain, and having a marked weight loss from her recurrent vomiting and bloody diarrhea, she asked for a fecal transplant.  Despite multiple refusals, she persisted.  Eight months after her ordeal began, Nancy received the stool transplant.  She describes her recovery as “miraculous” and within a few weeks, she was back to her teaching and active life.  Nancy concluded her story by reminding us that on any given day, 1 of 25 hospitalized patients becomes infected with C. diff. noting “the risk of contracting this deadly infection is too  great to remain uninformed.”

That message – from Nancy Sheridan, from the professionals who support us, and the patients who we hear from each day on our U.S. national Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) continue to drive us in educating, and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety, and providing support worldwide.

About The C Diff Foundation
The C Diff Foundation is a leading non-profit organization founded in 2012 by Nancy Caralla, a Nurse who was diagnosed and treated for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections. Through her own journey, and the loss of her father to C. difficile infection involvement, Nancy recognized the need for greater awareness through education about research being conducted by the government, industry and academia and better advocacy on behalf of patients, healthcare professionals and researchers worldwide working to address the public health threat posed by this devastating infection. Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter (@cdiffFoundation) or Facebook. For more information, visit: http://www.cdifffoundation.org/.

 

 

“Sepsis Knows No Boundaries; It Can Happen To Anyone” Discussed on C. diff. Spores and More With Guests Carl Flatley,DDS, Sherrie Dornberger,RN, and Hudson Garrett, Jr, PhD

 

Listen In On Tuesday, April 26th

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To access the live broadcast and Podcast Library
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
please click on the logo above *

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This week’s episode——

“Sepsis Knows No Boundaries; It Can Happen To Anyone”

TO DOWNLOAD AN INFORMATION GUIDE, COURTESY OF SEPSIS ALLIANCE, PLEASE

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

http://www.sepsis.org/files/sig_sepsisandcdifficile.pdf

Our Guests:

Dr. Carl Flatley, DDS, MSD

Sherrie Dornberger, RN,CDONA, GDCN, CDP, CADDCT, FACDONA
Clinician and Sepsis Survivor

Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr. PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC™ , C-NAC™ , PLNC

 

In this episode Sepsis will be defined by three Healthcare Clinicians and one Clinician — a Sepsis survivor.  According to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics estimates that, based upon information collected for billing purposes, the number of times people were in the hospital with sepsis or septicemia (another word for sepsis) increased from 621,000 in the year 2000 to 1,141,000 in 2008. Between 28 and 50 percent of people who get sepsis die.

Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection.  If sepsis progresses to septic shock, blood pressure drops dramatically, which may lead to death. Anyone can develop sepsis, but it’s most common and most dangerous in older adults or those with weakened immune systems. Early treatment of sepsis improves chances for survival.

MORE ABOUT OUR GUESTS:

Carl Flatley, DDS, MSD
On April 30, 2002, Carl Flatley’s life changed. It was the day his daughter
Erin died from Septic shock, something Dr. Flatley, a retired Endodontist,had never heard of.
After Erin’s death, Dr. Flatley learned everything he could about sepsis and he was
astounded at what he – and millions of other Americans – didn’t know about the condition.
He was shocked to learn that sepsis killed well over 200,000 people in the U.S. every year
and affected so many more survivors. In 2004, Dr. Flatley founded the American Sepsis Alliance,which in 2007,became Sepsis Alliance. He made it his mission that sepsis would become as well  known as cancer, diabetes, and other illnesses, and that as few people as possible would  get sepsis, let alone die from it. His unending devotion to Erin’s memory has had a  significant impact on many people.

Sherrie Dornberger, RN,CDONA, GDCN, CDP, CADDCT, FACDONA
Clinician and Sepsis Survivor
NADONA/LTC is a Nurse specialty organization representing the nurse leaders within the long term care continuum association with a mission to support and promote quality of care for those individuals receiving long term care, and concern for those delivering long term care. NADONA/LTC has nominated Sherrie Dornberger as their designated representative. Sherrie is the current Executive Director of NADONA/LTC, and is a Registered Nurse with 40+ years of experience in Nursing Administration, Long Term Care, and Infection Prevention.

Hudson Garrett, Jr. PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC™ , C-NAC™ , PLNC
Dr. Garrett is a recognized international expert in infection prevention and control.
Dr Garrett currently serves as the Chairperson of the Education Committee for the
C Diff Foundation, and Vice President, Clinical Affairs PDI, Inc. and is a graduate of the
Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. He was honored  as a Who’s Who for Infection Control by Infection Control Today Magazine in 2013 in recognition of his contributions to the field.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

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Dr Hudson Garrett, Jr Is Elected Chairman Of the Education Committee Of the C Diff Foundation

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We are pleased to announce that Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC™ , C-NAC™ , PLNC  has been elected  to
Chairman of the Education Committee of the C Diff Foundation.

 

Dr. Garrett will be overseeing, and developing the Foundation’s volunteer patient advocate (VPA) program, healthcare workshops and programs for both patients and clinicians.  As a member of the Foundation’s Research and Development committee, Dr. Garrett provided great support.

Dr. Garrett is aiding in the development of patient and clinician focused C.diff. Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network episodes and discussing  leading healthcare
topics — as our global listeners span across 56 countries and counting.

Dr. Hudson Garrett is currently employed as the VP, Clinical Affairs for PDI, Inc. and NIce-Pak, and is responsible for the global Clinical Affairs program and also the Medical Science Liaison program for all divisions within the company. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology/Chemistry and Nursing, a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular assess, moderate sedation, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.

Dr. Garrett currently serves on the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Pediatric Subcommittee, as President of the Board of Directors, for the Vascular Access Certification Corporation, is the past Education Chair for the Greater Atlanta Chapter of the Association for Professionals In Infection Control and Epidemiology Board of Directors, a National Faculty Member for the Emergency Care and Safety Institute, President of the Board of Directors for the Southeast Chapter of the Infusion Nurses Society, the Industry Liaison for the Board of Directors for the Association for the Healthcare Environment, a member of the Clinical Practices Advisory Committee for the Association for Vascular Access, and a past member of the Recommended Practices Advisory Board for the Association of Peri-operative Registered Nurses. In addition, Dr. Garrett received a Presidential Citation from the Society of Critical Care Medicine in 2011 in recognition for his advancement of critical care nursing and infection prevention.

He also serves as the Industry Liaison for the Assoc. for the Healthcare Environment Board of Directors, is the lead faculty member for the Assoc. for the Healthcare Environment’s Online Certificate Program in the Essentials of Infection Prevention for Environmental Services Professionals, two time nominee for the Assoc. for Vascular Access Herbst Award, served as a reviewer for the 2013 Best Practices in Adult Peripheral Vascular Access Resource Guide for the Assoc. of Vascular Access, currently the second author for the second revision of the Assoc. for Vascular Access Pediatric Special Interest Organization Guidelines which is scheduled to be released in 2015, also an author for the AVA CVC Best Practices Resource guide. He was also recognized as a 2013 “Who’s who in Infection Prevention and Control” by Infection Control Magazine.

Dr. Garrett has published in many publications including Infection Control Today, Managing Infection Control, Provider, The Assisted Living Journal, and in the American Journal of Long Term Care, American Journal of Critical Care, and also in several Mosby Saunders medical textbooks to name a few.

He is currently an active member of many professional organizations including:
Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, the Association for the Healthcare Environment, the Society of Hospital Epidemiology of America, Infectious Disease Society of America, Association for Vascular Access, Infusion Nurses Society, American Society for Professionals in Patient Safety, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Assoc. for Peri-operative Registered Nurses, American Medical Directors Assoc., American Assoc. of Moderate Sedation Nurses, American College of Healthcare Executives, Nat’l Assoc. of Directors of Nursing in Long Term Care, American Assoc. for Long Term Care Nursing, American Assoc. of Nurse Assessment Coordinators, and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

Dr. Hudson Garrett is passionate about delivering unsurpassed material and provides excellent support on every level. We are fortunate to have Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr. leading the Foundation’s Education Committee.  Please join us in congratulating him on his new, well-deserved position.

 

Nancy C. Caralla, Founder, Executive Director
With the C Diff Foundation Board of Directors, Chairpersons and Committee Members

Antibiotic Resistance Is Everybody’s Business – Don’t Wait Another Day To “Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work”

getsmartlogo

 

 

 

Dr. Judy Stone, MD made good points about how we have a long way to go to be where the CDC would like us to be in both knowledge and practice focused on Antibiotics.   ” Last year, the Wellcome Trust brought us grim news about antibiotic resistance, with dire projections that 10 million people might die each year due to resistance, and equally severe economic consequences.”

Through the  “Get Smart” campaign and programs offered everyone can gain valuable knowledge about Antibiotics.  The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides the  Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work educational  programs for the general public, for farming, and healthcare.

Take a moment and review the CDC’s “Get Smart” information provided on their website and diligently advocate for the safety and the proper use of antibiotics worldwide.

(An excerpt from Dr. Stone’s article)

At last week’s C. diff Foundation conference, Dr. Hudson Garrett suggested that physicians employ a slightly different tactic. Rather than give in to demands for an unnecessary and harmful antibiotic prescription, he suggested that the patients receive a written prescription for specific symptomatic relief products, to provide this sense of validation and to boost satisfaction. It would be nice to see if this can be verified through studies.

Patients seem to have a love-hate relationship with antibiotics, both wanting them, and yet feeling they are a “harsh” and “necessary evil.” This in turn leads many to stop taking them early, not wanting their body to “grow immune”—and not understanding that it is the bacteria that become resistant to antibiotics. This was a widespread belief that appears difficult to overcome.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/judystone/2015/11/18/cdc-says-its-time-to-get-smart-about-antibiotics-weve-got-a-long-way-to-go/2/

Additional information presenting the “Get Smart” Know When Antibiotics Work

 

Antibiotic Resistance Is Everybody’s Business