Tag Archives: Raising C Diff Awareness

November 29th Is Giving Tuesday – A Global Day Of Giving and Your Support Grows and Strengthens the C Diff Foundation

giving-tuesday

#GivingTuesday

Giving Tuesday Is a global day dedicated to giving back.

On Tuesday, November 29th , 2016  Charities, Families, Businesses, Community centers, and Students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give.

 

giving tuesday

#GivingTuesday was founded in 2012 by New York’s 92nd Street Y in partnership with the United Nations Foundation. Together, with a team of influential and founding partners together launched a global movement that has engaged over 10,000 organizations worldwide.

Remember the C Diff Foundation in your Giving Tuesday efforts. Your gift is tax deductible and it will support patients touched by the life-threatening C. diffiicle infection,  their families, communities and the many  programs dedicated in Raising C. diff. Awareness™   by providing information and support — from villages to cities — worldwide.

We appreciate you and all that you do for the good of others.

To Donate please visit  the C Diff Foundation Website   www.cdifffoundation.org

and choose the tab at the top of the page —

https://cdifffoundation.org/donate/

 

Thank you for your continued support and we are grateful for your generosity.

“What is C. diff.?” One Woman Walked Up To Us And Asked – Then the Crowd Followed

Heather and Kimberly III 7.23.16

The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocates; Heather Clark and
her sister, Kimberly Reilly participated at local events over the summer season  to educate and advocate
for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety within the local communities raising C. diff. awareness and saving lives.

 

On behalf of the C Diff Foundation , we sincerely thank you Heather and Kimberly for your dedication, your time, and for joining the
C Diff Foundation partnering and sharing our global mission.

We are truly grateful to the many special Volunteer Patient Advocates, the special individuals donating their time in “Raising C. diff. Awareness within their communities” around the globe.  Thank You!

Heather and Kimberly lost their dear Father from C.diff. involvement.  Shortly after his passing,  Heather and Kimberly took a stand with the C Diff Foundation and dedicated their time and efforts in  “Raising C. diff. Awareness” to help educate, and advocate for this life-threatening infection that played a big part in their Father’s passing.

To listen to Heather’s journey, with fellow C. diff. survivors,  – please click on the podcast link below:

http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/85287/c-diff-survivors-share-their-unique-journey-through-a-c-diff-infection-and-how-it-changed-their

“What is C. diff.?”

Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) is gram-positive, anaerobic, and a spore, rod/spindle-shape,
a common bacterium of the human intestine in 2 – 5%. C diff. becomes a serious gastrointestinal infection when individuals have been exposed to antibiotic therapy, and/or have experienced a long-term hospitalization, and/or have had an extended stay in a long-term care facility. However; the risk of acquiring a C diff. infection (CDI) has increased as it is in the community (Community Acquired CDI) and found in outpatient settings.

There are significant risk factors in patients who are immunosuppressant, ones who have been on antibiotic therapy, and the elderly population.

How do Antibiotics cause C diff.? The antibiotics cause a disruption in the normal intestinal flora which leads to an over growth of C difficile bacteria in the colon. The leading antibiotics known to disrupt the normal intestinal flora, yet not limited to, are Ampicillin, Amoxicillin, Cephalosporins, Clindamycin, and the broad spectrum antibiotics.

Since  November 2012 the CDC has shared public announcements regarding antibiotic use: Colds and many ear and sinus infections are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Taking antibiotics to treat a “virus” can make those drugs less effective when you and your family really need them. Limiting the usage of antibiotics will also help limit new cases of CDI.
*Always discuss the symptoms and medications with the treating Physician.

What are C.diff. Symptoms? Symptoms of Clostridium difficile (C.diff.)
C.diff. strains produce several toxins; the most popular are enterotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin A and cytotoxin – Clostridium difficile toxin B.  Both strains are responsible for the symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and can advance to a complication of a severe inflammation of the colon; pseudomembranous colitis, which can also lead to further complications of toxic megacolon.

How is C.diff. Transmitted? Mode of transmission of CDI can be either directly or indirectly, hospital acquired (nosocomial) or community – acquired; Ingesting C.diff spores transmitted from others and patients by hands, or altered normal intestinal flora by antibiotic therapy allowing proliferation of C.diff.  in the colon.  Coming in contact with surfaces, devices, or material with Clostridium difficile spores can easily be transferred to individuals by hands that have touched a contaminated surface or item. Examples of surfaces, devices, and materials contaminated with C.diff. spores in hospital and community/outpatient settings: commodes, bath tubs, showers, hand rails, bed rails, counter tops, handles, clothing, medical equipment, and electronic rectal thermometers.

The C Diff Foundation provide a wide range of programs, such as education, and advocacy for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, support, and environmental safety worldwide, training of volunteer patient advocates (VPA’s) across the globe to provide educational workshops, supplying life-saving medications for those afflicted with this infection from young children to seniors, building satellite branches across the globe, presenting educational workshops in educational programs, improving and expanding the C. difficile infection awareness, providing global tele-conferencing support sessions in mental health counseling, long-term illnesses, the prevention, treatments, environmental safety with nutritional education for patients, and families suffering through a C. difficile infection
and so much more.

We are working together and dedicated at raising C. diff. awareness to witness a decrease in newly diagnosed C. difficile infections worldwide and through dedication and efforts of the
C Diff Foundation Volunteers – we will meet our goals.

Lycoming Fair 7.16.16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treatments For CDI?   Treating C diff is becoming more challenging to physicians, frustrating to patients, and costly to the health care industry. To date there are three antibiotics effective at treating C diff: Metronidazole is prescribed to treat mild to moderate symptoms and is cost effective (8). Vancomycin is prescribed for moderate to severe symptoms via: oral route as intravenous administration does not achieve gut lumen therapeutic levels. Vancomycin is prescribed to patients with unsuccessful results from the Metronidazole, or the patient is allergic, or pregnant, breastfeeding, or younger than ten years of age.

The most recent antibiotic, Dificid (fidaxomicin) http://www.dificid.com is the first medication approved by FDA to treat C diff. Associated-Diarrhea CDAD in over twenty five years with superiority in sustained clinical response (5) Loperamide, diphenoxylate and bismuth medications are contraindicated as they slow the fecal transit time which extends the toxins in the gastrointestinal system.

The use of Cholestyramine has demonstrated positive results as toxins A and B bind to the resin as it passes through the intestines aiding in slowing bowel motility and assists in decreasing dehydration (9).

C.diff. spores are able to live outside of the body for a very long period of time and are resistant to most routine cleaning agents. It has also been proven that alcohol based hand sanitizers remain ineffective in eradicating C. diff. spores. In 2009 Clorox Commercial Solutions Ultra Clorox Germicidal Bleach ® was named the first and only product to obtain Federal EPA registration for killing C. diff. spores on hard, non porous surfaces when used as directed (1).

Please visit the following Page for additional information:

https://cdifffoundation.org/c-diff-infection-%e2%99%a5-home-care/

 

The CDC also recommends a 1:10 ( 1 cup bleach to 9 cups of water) dilution of bleach and water for cleaning hard non-porous surfaces keeping areas covered with solution for 10 minutes and the solution is to be mixed fresh daily.

Hand hygiene following the guidelines in HAND WASING; it is important to wash hands before entering and exiting a patient’s room (4). The spores are difficult to remove from hands; Universal Contact Precautions remain best practice for healthcare personnel and Contact Precautions for patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CDI. Prevention through education about CDI has proven effective and beneficial to environmental housekeeping departments, health care professionals, administration, patients, and their families (2)

https://cdifffoundation.org/hand-washing-updates/

 

To Join The C Diff Foundation Volunteer Patient Advocate Program, please contact us by email info@cdifffoundation.org  or call us toll-free 1-844-FOR-CDIF

 

 

References:

(1) Clorox registered EPA
http://www.ahe.org/ahe/learn/press-releases/2009/20090402_clorox_epa_cdiff.shtml

(2) Clostridium difficile (CDI) Infections thttp://www.cdc.gov/hai/pdfs/toolkits/CDItoolkitwhite_clearance_edits.pdf
(3) Lab Tests and Diagnosis Mayo Clinichttp://www.mayoclinic.com/health/c-difficile/DS00736/DSECTION=tests-and-diagnosis
(4) CDC Hand washing
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/HandWashing/

(5) FDA announcement Dificid
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm257024.htm

(5) Dificid.com
http://www.dificid.com

(6) Probiotics in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3105609/

(6) Danimals PRNewswire8/Jan2012;
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dannonr-danimalsr-adds-proven-benefits-of-probiotics-53347947.html

(7) Get smart antibiotics week CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6144a7.htm

(8) Metronidazole
http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/flagyl

(9) Cholestyranine
http://www.globalrph.com/cholestyramine.htm

Smile.Amazon.com Program Provides Support

WorldII

Show your support to  the C Diff Foundation– it is as easy as a mouse click  with Smile.Amazon.com

 

 

♥ Mother’s Day ♥    is May 8th and your support is as easy as shopping at smile.amazon.com in support of the C Diff Foundation.

 
AmazonSmile Mother’s Day Link: http://smile.amazon.com/gp/charity/homepage.html?orig=%2Fgp%2Fbrowse.html%3Fnode%3D502659011&ein=46-1272728

Find a wonderful gift for you and  your family members and provide support by participating in the AmazonSmile Program.

Join us in our dedicated fight against C. diff. and help us continue our mission of educating, and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety and saving lives worldwide

Thank you for showing your support by participating in the AmazonSmile program.
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Make Mom Smile on Mother's Day

  Go to Org Central   C DIFF FOUNDATION

Through your support the C Diff Foundation will continue raising C. difficile infection
awareness, meeting the goals of our mission statement, and helping prevent this
life-threatening infection, and saving lives worldwide.

We thank you in advance for your support!

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Dr. Barbara McGovern, MD

BarbaraMcGovern (2)

We are pleased to welcome Dr. Barbara McGovern,MD to the C Diff Foundation.  Dr. McGovern  presides as a member of the Foundation’s Medical Advisory Board.

Dr. Barbara McGovern is Vice President of Medical Affairs at Seres Therapeutics. She obtained her M.D. degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and did her residency and infectious disease training at Tufts Medical Center where she worked many years as an infectious disease specialist.

 

 

Her clinical career began in working with HIV-infected patients, including taking care of incarcerated women with HIV and hepatitis C co-infection. When the rates of morbidity and mortality from HIV declined on potent ant-iretroviral therapy, she was one of the first to observe that end-stage liver disease secondary to hepatitis C infection had become a leading cause of death in HIV-infected patients and subsequently devoted her clinical research career to the management of these patients.

Dr. McGovern served as a member of the Antiviral Advisory Committee for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and also served several years on the Department of Health and Human Services Guideline Committee for management of viral hepatitis in HIV-infected patients. Dr. McGovern was also an Associate Editor at Clinical Infectious Diseases and was a Deputy Editor at Up-To-Date, an international medical journal where she founded a Global Health section for the care of patients living in developing countries.

Over the past three years she started working within the pharmaceutical arena and is currently head of Medical Affairs at Seres Therapeutics, which is developing microbiome-based therapies. Their lead microbiome therapeutic drug is SER-109, which is being evaluated in a Phase 2 clinical trial for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

Let’s Kick Off Raising C. diff. Awareness Worldwide

CDIFFSIGN1

“Raising C. diff.  Awareness ”

 

Let’s begin promoting C. difficile prevention and begin witnessing a shared goal in a decrease in newly diagnosed C.difficile infections worldwide.

 

HAND-WASHING remains the number one prevention.  Follow the hand washing procedures to ensure proper and effective technique:

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 30 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song  from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

When is it a good time for a hand-washing (hand hygiene) break?

Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food,Before and after patient care, Before and after treating a cut or wound, Before  exiting a restroom,  After a diaper change, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After petting a pet or any livestock animals, After touching garbage, AND OFTEN.

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommends infection prevention  protocols be shared between healthcare professionals and long-term facility administrators for the safety of the patient, visitors, and other patient’s safety.CDCantibioticresist2015infographic-a920px

 

 

 

 

 

 

Question the necessity of antibiotics to treat symptoms.  Unnecessary use of antibiotics raises the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Remember antibiotics do not effect viruses.  Healthcare professionals; confirming a bacterial infection before prescribing antibiotic course of treatment is advised.

Testing:  When a patient presents symptoms (diarrhea with abdominal cramping/pain, fatigue, fever) ordering a C. difficile stool test to rule out a C. diff. infection is beneficial, especially if the patient has been treated with antibiotics within ninety-days.

Environmental Safety:  Disinfecting a patient’s room, treated for a positive C. difficile infection, with a bleach or Federal EPA registered spore-killing product will help eliminate   C. difficile spores from being spread to another patient’s room.  Environmental safety is also an important matter in home-care.  Cleaning all high-touch areas in both long-term and acute care facilities, and home environments will help decrease the spread of this infection.  (High-touch surfaces: light switches, door knobs/handles, bed-side commodes, bathroom hand rails, commode, sink and sink handles, counter-tops, floors, bath-tubs, showers, canes, wheel-chairs, and all medical equipment in a patient’s room).

Person Protection: Visitors and Environmental professionals, wear proper personal protection equipment when treating and cleaning areas/rooms of a C. difficile patient.  (gloves, gowns, shoe coverings, protective eye wear if using using spray solutions).

Patient Isolation:  Protect the patient and others by keeping a C. difficile patient in isolation in long-term and acute care facilities.  This will prevent the spread of infection to others and other areas within the facilities.

Communication:  If a patient is being transferred from either a long-term or acute care facility, communicate to the facility intake personnel the patient’s C. diff. infection and necessary infection control protocols to be implemented for the patient and other patient’s safety.

The CDC has been sharing public announcements regarding the use of Antibiotics for both healthcare professionals and patients alike.  Colds, Ear and Sinus symptoms may be caused by a virus, not bacteria.  Taking antibiotics to treat a virus makes antibiotic medications less effective when they are needed while raising the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection.  Limit the use of Antibiotics to reduce the risk of acquiring a C. difficile infection  (Bacterial infections and the treatment of symptoms will be determined and should be followed by the treating healthcare professionals). * 2015 Get Smart Week is November 16-22.

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join the CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign.

None of us can do this alone…..all of us can do this TOGETHER!

 

For additional C. difficile information, review the archives and categories available on the website :   http://www.cdifffoundation.org