Tag Archives: Nursing

Severe Cases of C.diff. Infection (CDI)Study Suggests the Most Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic Is Not the Best Treatment

Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile  (C. diff ) now the most common healthcare-acquired infection in the United States.

 

As published – to view the article in its entirety please click on the link below to be redirected:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-02/uou-rpa020117.php

But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for severe cases. Scientists at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and University of Utah report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole.

The findings will be published online on Feb. 6, 2017 on the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine website.

C. diff does not cause illness outright. The bacterium produces two chemicals that are toxic to the human body. These toxins work in concert to irritate the cells of the Large intestinal lining producing the symptoms associated with the illness. Symptoms of CDI include watery diarrhea, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, and abdominal pain and tenderness. Severe cases are associated with inflammation of the colon.

Current guidelines primarily recommend two antibiotics metronidazole or vancomycin to treat CDI. While vancomycin was the original treatment, the medical community has favored metronidazole for the past few decades, because it is less expensive and will limit vancomycin resistance in other hospital-acquired infections. The guidelines are based on small clinical trials carried out about 30 years ago.

“For many years the two antibiotics were considered to be equivalent in their ability to cure C. diff and prevent recurrent disease,” says Stevens. “Our work and several other studies show that this isn’t always the case.” In the current issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, the research team looked at the effectiveness of the two drugs by comparing the risk of mortality after treatment with these two antibiotics.

The investigators conducted the largest study to date by examining the data from more than 10,000 patients treated for CDI through the US Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system from 2005 to 2012. A severe case of CDI was defined as a patient with an elevated white blood cell count or serum creatinine within four days of the CDI diagnosis. A mild to moderate case of CDI was defined as a patient with normal white blood cell counts and creatinine levels. About 35 percent of cases in this study were considered severe.

Patients with a severe case of CDI had lower mortality rates when treated with vancomycin compared to metronidazole (15.3 percent versus 19.8 percent). The scientists calculated that only 25 patients with severe CDI would need to be treated with vancomycin to prevent one death. “That is a powerful, positive outcome for our patient’s well-being,” explains Stevens. She cautions that the researchers still do not understand how the choice of antibiotic affects mortality rates.

“Although antibiotics are one of the greatest miracles of modern medicine, there are still tremendous gaps in our knowledge about when and how to use them to give our patients the best health outcomes,” explains Michael Rubin, M.D., Ph.D., an associate professor in internal medicine and an investigator at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System.

“This research shows that if providers choose vancomycin over metronidazole to treat patients with severe CDI, it should result in a lower risk of death for those critically ill patients,” said Rubin. This study showed that less than 15 percent of CDI patients, including severe cases, received vancomycin.

The study results did not show a difference in the rate of the illness returning following either antibiotic treatment whether the initial illness was mild to moderate or severe. Nor did it show a difference for the rate of death following either antibiotic treatment for mild to moderate CDI cases.

Stevens cautions that the study was observational in nature and does not prove cause and effect of the drug. In addition, the study focused on patients that were primarily men; however, past studies show that the C. diff treatment outcomes for men and women were similar.

According to Stevens, future work should balance the targeted application of vancomycin treatment, especially for severe CDI cases, with economic considerations and the consequences of antibiotic resistance. “The optimal way to move forward is to do decision analysis that allows us to weigh the pros and cons of the various treatment strategies,” she says.

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The research was funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Health Services Research and Development.

In addition to Stevens and Rubin, co-authors include Richard Nelson, Karim Khader, Makoto Jones, Lindsay Croft and Matthew Samore (University of Utah and the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System), Elyse Schwab-Daugherty and Kevin A. Brown (Public Health Ontario and University of Toronto), Tom Greene (University of Utah), Melinda Neuhauser (VA Pharmacy Benefits Management Services) and Peter Glassman and Matthew Bidwell Goetz (VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System).

ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) Is Now Available For Prescription To Reduce Recurrence Of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI)

ZINPLAVA (bezlotoxumab) is now available for prescription.

Ordering information is available on the brand website:

http://www.zinplava.com/

What is Zinplava ?

ZINPLAVA is indicated to reduce recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients 18 years of age or older who are receiving antibacterial drug treatment of CDI and are at a high risk for CDI recurrence.

ZINPLAVA is not indicated for the treatment of CDI.

ZINPLAVA is not an antibacterial drug.

ZINPLAVA should only be used in conjunction with antibacterial drug treatment of CDI.

Full prescribing information can be read at

http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/z/zinplava/zinplava_pi.pdf

The Merck Access Program can help answer physician’s questions about:
Insurance coverage for patients
Prior Authorizations and Appeals
Coding and Billing
Potential financial assistance options for eligible patients

Full program details can be found at:

https://www.merckaccessprogram-zinplava.com/hcp/

Also, Information about co-pay assistance for eligible, privately insured patients
Information about available independent assistance foundation support.

 

*PLEASE NOTE – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product, medication,  and/or clinical study in progress and available.     All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only.

 

Antibiotics; The Main Source Of C. diff. Epidemic Found Through Most Recent UK Study

 

As published by

University of Leeds  UK

 

Restricting the use of a common antibiotic was more important than a high profile ‘deep clean’ of hospitals in massively reducing UK antibiotic resistant Clostridium difficile, a major study found.

“These findings are of international importance because other regions such as North America, where fluoroquinolone prescribing remains unrestricted, still suffer from epidemic numbers of C. diff infections.”

http://www.leeds.ac.uk/news/article/3978/overuse_of_antibiotics_the_main_cause_of_c_diff_epidemic

The study concluded that overuse of antibiotics like ciprofloxacin led to the outbreak of severe diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile (C.diff) that hit headlines from 2006 onward. The outbreak was stopped by substantially reducing use of ciprofloxacin and related antibiotics.

Inappropriate use and widespread over prescribing of fluoroquinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin in fact allowed C. diff bugs that were resistant to the drug to thrive, because non-resistant bugs in the gut were killed off by the antibiotic, leaving the way clear for rapid growth of resistant C. diff.

Concerns about hospital ‘superbugs’ which had become resistant to common antibiotics resulted in the announcement of a program of “deep cleaning” and other infection control measures in the NHS in 2007.

The study, by the University of Leeds, University of Oxford and Public Health England published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, found that cases of C. diff fell only when fluoroquinolone use was restricted and used in a more targeted way as one part of many efforts to control the outbreak.

The restriction of fluoroquinolones resulted in the disappearance in the vast majority of cases of the infections caused by the antibiotic-resistant C. diff, leading to around an 80% fall in the number of these infections in the UK (in Oxfordshire approximately 67% of C. diff bugs were antibiotic-resistant in September 2006, compared to only approximately 3% in February 2013).

In contrast, the smaller number of cases caused by C. diff bugs that were not resistant to fluoroquinolone antibiotics stayed the same. Incidence of these non-resistant bugs did not increase due to patients being given the antibiotic, and so were not affected when it was restricted.

At the same time, the number of bugs that were transmitted between people in hospitals did not change. This was despite the implementation of comprehensive infection prevention and control measures, like better hand-washing and hospital cleaning in this case.

The study’s authors therefore conclude that ensuring antibiotics are used appropriately is the most important way to control the C. diff superbug.

The authors note that it is important that good hand hygiene and infection control continues to be practiced to control the spread of other infections.

The study analyzed data on the numbers of C. diff infections and amounts of antibiotics used in hospitals and by GPs in the UK.

More than 4,000 C. diff bugs also underwent genetic analysis using a technique called whole genome sequencing, to work out which antibiotics each bug was resistant to.

Co-author Derrick Crook, Professor of Microbiology, University of Oxford said: “Alarming increases in UK hospital infections and fatalities caused by C. diff made headline news during the mid-2000s and led to accusations of serious failings in infection control.

“Emergency measures such as ‘deep cleaning’ and careful antibiotic prescribing were introduced and numbers of C. diff infections gradually fell by 80% but no-one was sure precisely why.

“Our study shows that the C. diff epidemic was an unintended consequence of intensive use of an antibiotic class, fluoroquinolones, and control was achieved by specifically reducing use of this antibiotic class, because only the C. diff bugs that were resistant to fluoroquinolones went away.

“Reducing the type of antibiotics like ciprofloxacin was, therefore, the best way of stopping this national epidemic of C. diff and routine, expensive deep cleaning was unnecessary. However it is important that good hand hygiene continues to be practiced to control the spread of other infections.

“These findings are of international importance because other regions such as North America, where fluoroquinolone prescribing remains unrestricted, still suffer from epidemic numbers of C. diff infections.”

Co-author Prof Mark Wilcox, Professor of Microbiology, University of Leeds, said: “Our results mean that we now understand much more about what really drove the UK epidemic of C. diff infection in the mid-2000s.

“Crucially, part of the reason why some C. diff strains cause so many infections is because they find a way to exploit modern medical practice.

“Similar C. diff bugs that affected the UK have spread around the world, and so it is plausible that targeted antibiotic control could help achieve large reductions in C. diff infections in other countries.”

The funding for the study came from the UK Clinical Research Collaboration, (Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, National Institute for Health Research); NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre; NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antibiotic Resistance, University of Oxford in partnership with Leeds University and Public Health England; NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Modelling Methodology, Imperial College London in partnership with Public Health England; and the Health Innovation Challenge Fund.

Further information:  Source:

Contact Sophie Freeman in the University of Leeds

press office on 0113 343 8059 or email s.j.freeman@leeds.ac.uk

 

Learn More About The Signs and Symptoms Of Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

 

 

 

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

T

Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

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REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

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 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

Michael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

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