Tag Archives: Healthcare providers

Learn More About The Signs and Symptoms Of Sepsis With The CDC; It’s A Race Against Time

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Saving patients from sepsis is a race against time

CDC calls sepsis a medical emergency; encourages prompt action for prevention, early recognition

Sepsis is caused by the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection and requires rapid intervention. It begins outside of the hospital for nearly 80 percent of patients. According to a new Vital Signs report released by CDC, about 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had used health care services recently or had chronic diseases that required frequent medical care. These represent opportunities for healthcare providers to prevent, recognize, and treat sepsis long before it can cause life-threatening illness or death.

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“When sepsis occurs, it should be treated as a medical emergency,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Doctors and nurses can prevent sepsis and also the devastating effects of sepsis, and patients and families can watch for sepsis and ask, ‘could this be sepsis?’”   

Certain people with an infection are more likely to get sepsis, including people age 65 years or older, infants less than 1 year old, people who have weakened immune systems, and people who have chronic medical conditions (such as diabetes). While much less common, even healthy children and adults can develop sepsis from an infection, especially when not recognized early. The signs and symptoms of sepsis include: shivering, fever, or feeling very cold; extreme pain or discomfort; clammy or sweaty skin; confusion or disorientation; shortness of breath and a high heart rate.

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According to the Vital Signs report, infections of the lung, urinary tract, skin, and gut most often led to sepsis. In most cases, the germ that caused the infection leading to sepsis was not identified. When identified, the most common germs leading to sepsis were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and some types of Streptococcus.

 

Health care providers, patients and their family members can work as a team to prevent sepsis.

Health care providers play a critical role in protecting patients from infections that can lead to sepsis and recognizing sepsis early. Health care providers can:

·         Prevent infections. Follow infection control requirements (such as handwashing) and ensure patients to get recommended vaccines (e.g., flu and pneumococcal).

·         Educate patients and their families. Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and, if an infection is not improving, promptly seek care. Don’t delay.

·         Think sepsis. Know the signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients earlier.

·         Act fast. If sepsis is suspected, order tests to help determine if an infection is present, where it is, and what caused it. Start antibiotics and other recommended medical care immediately.

·         Reassess patient management. Check patient progress frequently. Reassess antibiotic therapy 24-48 hours or sooner to change therapy as needed. Determine whether the type of antibiotics, dose, and duration are correct.

CDC is working on five key areas related to sepsis:

·         Increasing sepsis awareness by engaging clinical professional organizations and patient advocates.

·         Aligning infection prevention, chronic disease management, and appropriate antibiotic use to promote early recognition of sepsis.

·         Studying risk factors for sepsis that can guide focused prevention and early recognition.

·         Developing tracking for sepsis to measure impact of successful interventions.

·         Preventing infections that may lead to sepsis by promoting vaccination programs, chronic disease management, infection prevention, and appropriate antibiotic use.

To read the entire Vital Signs report visit: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/sepsis.

For more information on sepsis and CDC’s work visit: www.cdc.gov/sepsis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

 

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Glenn Taylor, Head Microbiologist At the Taymount Clinic UK Discusses Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) To Treat a Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) on C diff Spores and More #CdiffRadio

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On Tuesday, March 8th  our guest, Glenn Taylor — Head Microbiologist –  joined us to discuss

“Taymount Clinic; Pioneering Fecal Microbiota Transplant ‘FMT’ For Digestive Problems”

CLICK ON THE Cdiff radio LOGO BELOW TO ACCESS THE PODCAST OF THIS EPISODE **

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Our guest, Glenn Taylor – Microbiologist at the Taymount Clinic just outside London in the UK, joined us to discuss this important topic.   Glenn has spent more than five years researching the commensal colonization of bacteria in the human digestive system. The Taymount Clinics are known internationally as a specialist center for the production of tested, certified, high quality gut bacteria and effective, efficient implant techniques Researching intestinal bacteria since 2006, the Taymount Clinic is now a recognized world leader in applying Fecal / Faecal Microbiota Transplant or FMT treatment procedures to create a “normal” bacterial environment in patients with a broad range of conditions. The Taymount clinic provides FMT treatment to normalize gut bacteria in patients with a Clostridium difficile infection.

For additional information visit the Taymount Clinic website:  www.taymount.com

C. diff. Spores and More™  Global Broadcasting Network –  producing educational programs dedicated to  C. difficile Infections and more —  brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

The C Diff Foundation Offers Patients, Family Members, and Clinicians Global Community Support

We are pleased to announce the

C. diff. Global Community Support Program —   an extension of  our

existing patient program – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program.

Our Foundation Members and Medical Advocates, leading the support groups, via: teleconferencing, will now have the ability to offer support to patients, families, clinicians, and individuals seeking support —  in  the U.S. and 57 countries.

Below you will find the list of countries, with their local cities,  able
to participate in our teleconferencing support groups:

Argentina – Buenos Aires and Cordoba
Australia – Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney
Austria – Countrywide, Vienna
Bahrain – Countrywide
Belgium – Brussels
Brazil – Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
Bulgaria – Sofia
Canada – Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Toronto,
Vancouver, Winnipeg.
Chile – Santiago
China – Beijing
Columbia – Bogota
Costa Rica – National VolP
Croatia – Zagreb
Cyprus – Nicosia
Czech Republic – Prague
Denmark – Countrywide
Dominican Republic – Santo Domingo
El Salvador – San Salvador
Finland – Helsinki
France – Marseille, Paris
Germany – Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich
Greece – Athens
Hong Kong – Countrywide
Hungary – Budapest
India – Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai
Ireland – Dublin, National VolP
Israel – Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
Italy – Milan, Rome
Japan – Tokyo
Latvia- Riga
Lithuania – Vilnius
Luxembourg – Countrywide
Malaysia – Kuala Lumpur
Malta – Countrywide
Mexico – Guadalajara, Mexico City, Monterrey
Netherlands – Amsterdam
New Zealand – Auckland
Norway – Oslo
Panama – Panama City
Peru – Lima
Poland – Warsaw
Portugal – Countrywide
Puerto Rico – Aguadilla
Romania – Bucharest
Russia – Moscow
Singapore – Singapore
Slovakia – Bratislava
Slovenia – Ljubljana
South Africa – Cape Town, Johannesburg
South Korea – Seoul
Spain – Barcelona, Madrid
Sweden – Malmo, Stockholm
Switzerland – Bern, Geneva, Zurich
Turkey – Istanbul
Ukraine – National VolP
United Kingdom – Birmingham, Edinburgh, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, National.
Venezuela – Caracas

Registration will remain the same – through the main number (919) 201-1512
or utilizing the nationwide U.S. Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF, or from the Foundation website
http://www.cdifffoundation.org C. diff. Global Community Support page.

Support is only a phone call away worldwide

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Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) A Promising Treatment And Recurrent C diff Infections

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The media and publications are raising
FMT awareness .

The positive effects are being
noted as FMT’s hold a promising treatment option and success is being witnessed in patients suffering
through C. diff. infections.

Being treated  by a physician with a Fecal Microbiota Transplantation, to treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, is resolving the pain and torment being experienced by patients.

What is a Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)?

Fecal microbiota transplants (FMTs) are exactly what they sound like.
They involve taking feces from a healthy person and putting them into the body
of a sick patient to strengthen the community of bacteria that live in the patient’s gut.
FMTs are very effective at curing stubborn infections with Clostridium difficile (C. diff).

The deadly bacteria cause 500,000 illnesses and 14,000 deaths each year in the United States. Small studies have shown that FMTs can cure about 90 percent of serious C. diff infections. They have been so successful that scientists are testing the transplants for other conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome. (1)

However; this treatment – in any form – has not yet been approved by the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Clinical data is pending and FMT remains investigational at this time.

Below is the link to the FDA website and the March 2014 document regarding
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) for the general public:

III.  When FDA Intends to Exercise Enforcement Discretion 

FDA does not intend to exercise enforcement discretion for the use of an FMT product when the FMT product is manufactured from the stool of a donor who is not known by either the patient or the licensed health care provider treating the patient, or when the donor and donor stool are not qualified under the direction of the treating licensed health care provider.
FDA will continue to evaluate its enforcement policy.
Furthermore, during the period of enforcement discretion, FDA will continue to work with sponsors who intend to submit INDs for use of FMT to treat C. difficile infection not responding to standard therapies.
This enforcement discretion policy does not extend to other uses of FMT.  Data related to the use and study of FMT to treat diseases or conditions other than C. difficile infection are  more limited, and study of FMT for these other uses is not included in this enforcement policy.  (2)
* Also, click on the link below to view the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Upcoming Workshop Information:
**  Always discuss treatment options available with a Healthcare provider
and review/discuss clinical studies in progress.
Resources:

Emphasize The Importance Of Antibiotic Stewardship To Control C. difficile Worldwide

Antibiotic Resistance – It’s Everybody’s Business

Antibiotic Resistance Know The Facts

As the incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection spirals, physicians should emphasize the importance of antibiotic stewardship.

A study published in the journal affiliated with the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) summarized a recent NFID webinar by Carolyn V. Gould, MD, and L. Clifford McDonald, MD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Thomas M. File, Jr., MD, Editor-in-Chief, Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice.

While C. diff is mainly a significant hospital-acquired infection, recently approximately 5% of C. diff cases are diagnosed outside hospitals.

Since prior antibiotic treatment is the primary risk factor for C. diff, antibiotic stewardship is considered a key factor in controlling significant spikes in incidences.

Antibiotics are capable of disrupting intestinal balance, thereby creating the opportunity for C. diff spores to produce diarrhea-causing toxins.

According to the CDC, there are six essential methods to consider for C. diff prevention:

·      Careful prescribing and use of antibiotics
·      Early and reliable diagnosis
·      Immediate isolation of infected patients
·      Contact precautions – wearing gloves and gowns for all contact with the patient and patient-care environment
·      Adequately cleaning patient care environments; using an EPA-registered C. diff sporicidal disinfectant
·      Effective communication about C. diff status when patients are transferred between healthcare facilities

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To review article in its entirety click on the following link:

http://www.hcplive.com/medical-news/immediate-action-necessary-to-control-c-diff-infection

C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

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The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website https://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html

Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI, C. diff. ) for Healthcare Providers

Patients admitted to an ICU for Clostridium difficile infection were at risk for developing subsequent C. difficile infections, according to recent research.

To read this article in its entirety:

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/gastrointestinal-infections/news/online/%7Be22ec9f0-c474-4753-9b95-2084d4f9b177%7D/icu-patients-admitted-with-c-difficile-colonization-at-risk-for-subsequent-infections

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Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) warranting admission to the ICU may benefit from a treatment regimen of combined oral vancomycin and IV metronidazole, according to recent findings.

To read article in its entirety: 

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/gastrointestinal-infections/news/online/%7B86429037-44a1-4ac3-9241-b2a8f31d9312%7D/c-difficile-patients-benefit-from-oral-vancomycin-iv-metronidazole-combination

In a retrospective, observational, comparative study, researchers evaluated 88 critically ill adult patients with C. difficile who were admitted to the ICU at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center between June 2007 and September 2012. All patients were treated for CDI with oral vancomycin, and those in the combination therapy group received concomitant metronidazole intravenously for a minimum of 72 hours. Patients were matched and equally placed within either the combination or vancomycin-only groups using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) metric. The patients were clinically and demographically comparable, although the combination therapy group had a higher prevalence of moderate-to-severe renal disease.

The study’s primary outcome was in-hospital death, and secondary outcomes included clinical success at days 6, 10 and 21; hospital length of stay after diagnosis of CDI; and duration of ICU stay after diagnosis of CDI. Multivariable analysis was used to identify factors independently correlated with survival.