Tag Archives: Depression

Researchers Find Gut Microbes Linked to Depression

Mice experiments and small studies of people with depression have suggested the involvement of the gut microbiome in both behavior and depression, respectively. However, human research addressing how gut microorganisms might contribute to depression—in large samples and considering confounding factors that can affect the microbiota—is lacking.

A new study of two large groups of Europeans, led by Dr. Sara Vieira-Silva and Dr. Jeroen Raes from the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium), has found new links between gut microbes and depression.

The researchers used 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequencing to analyze the fecal microbiota of 1,054 Belgians enrolled in the Flemish Gut Flora Project, aimed at studying gut microbiome variation at population level. Furthermore, microbial taxa were correlated with the participants’ quality of life and incidence of depression, using a self-reported quality of life questionnaire and general practitioner-supplied diagnoses of the latter. The researchers also validated the associations in an independent cohort of 1,063 individuals from the Netherlands’ LifeLines DEEP (LLD) project.

Ten genus abundances were correlated with quality of life scores, including both mental and physical scores. Among these bacterial genera, Faecalibacterium, Coprococcus, Dialister, Butyrivibrio, Gemmiger, Fusicatenibacter and Prevotella were consistently associated with higher quality of life scores, whereas Parabacteroides, Streptococcus and Flavonifractor showed negative associations. After controlling for a wealth of confounding factors, the authors validated some of these associations in the LLD cohort.

The researchers found that Dialister and Coprococcus genera were reduced in people with depression, after taking into account antidepressant drugs as confounders. Furthermore, the authors described an association between enterotype distribution in relation to quality of life scores and diagnosis of depression in the Flemish cohort. For instance, a higher prevalence of Bacteroides enterotype 2 was linked to lower quality of life and depression.

Finally, the authors dug through metagenomic data to create a catalogue describing the gut microbiota’s ability to synthetize or degrade molecules that can cross-talk with the human nervous system. With this aim, Raes and colleagues assessed the distribution of 56 compounds that play an important role in proper nervous system function, which gut microbes either synthesize or metabolize, in human gut-associated microbial genomes (n=532).

Certain neuroactive compounds might explain the beneficial relationship between gut microbes and quality of life. The researchers found, for example, that GABA and tryptophan metabolism pathways were expressed in human gut-associated microorganisms.

Furthermore, some positive correlations were also observed between quality of life and the potential ability of the gut microbiome to produce 3,4-dihydroxyphenyalcetic acid -a breakdown product of the neurotransmitter dopamine-, isovaleric acid and histamine. Of these, the association between 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and quality of life was also replicated in the LLD cohort. As neurotransmitters and neuroactive compounds can also have an impact on bacterial growth, further research is needed to disentangle the contribution of microbe-derived neuroactive molecules to a person’s behavior.

This is the first approach to build a database for studying the gut microbiome’s neuroactive potential and it will help future research to interpret microbiome-gut-mental axis research in a clearer way, supporting the translation of such complex research from the bench to the clinic.

Although these new findings do not prove cause and effect due to the observational design of the study, this research contributes to mounting evidence about mechanisms by which the “microbiome-gut-brain axis” is involved in the development of depression. Further options to experimentally prove the association between the gut microbiota and depression might include rodent models and large studies with enough follow-up periods that explore the role of probiotics, prebiotics, a healthy diet and fecal microbiota transplantation for recovering microbiota, considering the confounding effects of microbiome covariates.

On the whole, this new study strengthens the link between gut bacteria and depression. This is a first step towards understanding how the gut microbiome and its metabolites might affect mood in humans

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/en/a-large-study-of-belgian-and-dutch-people-finds-new-associations-between-gut-microbes-and-depression/

C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

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The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website https://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html