Tag Archives: Healthcare-Associated Infections

Contagion Live Infectious Diseases Today Report 2017 SHEA’s Spring Conference

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Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) continue to plague hospitals and long-term care facilities across the country, although, a recent report from shows that strategies to prevent these infections have made progress in decreasing their incidence since 2010. Still, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stated that a least one healthcare-associated infection is reported in about one in 25 hospitals on any given day.

When it comes to keeping up on the latest news regarding these harmful infections, the newest strategies being used to prevent them, antimicrobial stewardship efforts, and treating infections caused by organisms that have managed to develop resistance to current antibiotics, the annual Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Spring Conference is a gold mine packed full of information from key opinion leaders in the field, and Contagion® will be reporting on the conference for the second year in a row.

Since our inception in February 2016, Contagion® has kept readers current on new findings pertaining to healthcare-associated infections. Two of the big culprits that are most commonly behind these harmful and costly infections are Clostridium difficile and Staphylococcus aureus.

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At last year’s SHEA Conference, we interviewed Robin Jump, MD, PhD, about the burden of C. difficile in the hospital setting and up-and-coming prevention methods that healthcare providers can use to help manage these infections.

– See more at: http://www.contagionlive.com/news/contagion-to-report-on-2017-shea-spring-conference#sthash.kxaDnByE.dpuf

Cdiff Spores and More With Dr. Mark Stibich Discuss Healthcare-associated Infections Being Successfully Eliminated By Xenex Germ Zapping Robots, UV Disinfection Services

 

Listen To The May 17th, 2016 PodCast

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C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This episode——

“Xenex Germ Zapping Robots, UV Disinfection Services”

With Our Guest:       Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD

Join us as guest, and co-founder of Xenex, Dr. Mark Stibich Epidemiologist and Chief Scientific Officer, discusses UV Disinfection with Xenex UV Disinfecting Systems and Germ Zapping Robots making a clean sweep across the globe zapping ‪‎C.diff‬. and all harmful germs that can cause pain, suffering, and double digits in the already stressed healthcare industry.

 

MORE ABOUT OUR GUEST:

Dr Mark Stibich, a co-founder of Xenex, Mark oversees scientific research, new technology development, and protocol design. An epidemiologist who has published many scientific papers about Pulsed Xenon technology, Mark is also an inventor on multiple patents. Originally from Dayton, OH, Mark graduated from Yale and the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, where he earned a Masters in Health Science and PhD.  Mark’s interest in public health has taken him to many distant countries. He served as a Peace Corps health volunteer and then trained Peace Corps health volunteers in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. He has conducted research in Russia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, South Africa, Kenya, the U. S., and Brazil. In addition, he has received grants for and directed HIV/AIDS research and intervention projects throughout Russia and has been a consultant with the USAID project.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

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Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™  is made possible through our official  Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

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Patient Safety With The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Surveillance Antibiotic Resistance Patient Safety Atlas and More

P A T I E N T   S A F E T Y 

CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance Patient Safety Atlas provides open and interactive data about healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, which are reported to CDC through the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).

You can customize maps and tables to show antibiotic resistance patterns in Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI’s)  by filtering the data by geographical area (national, regional, and state), time period, event type, and patient age.

For more information visit the following CDC Website:

http://www.cdc.gov/hai/surveillance/ar-patient-safety-atlas.html

Taking Aim at Superbugs and A Review Of the Latest CDC Vital Signs Report With Guest Clifford McDonald, MD Of the CDC

Listen In On Tuesday, March 22nd

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To access the live broadcast and program archives,
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
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C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

“Taking aim at “super-bugs” and the latest CDC Vital Signs Report results”

With Our Guest, Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, — Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC

Tuesday, March 22nd at the following times

10 a.m. Pacific Time
11 a.m. Mountain Time 
12 p.m. Central Time  
1 p.m. Eastern Time

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sounds the alarm on the danger of modern medicine returning to a time when simple infections were often fatal. As the latest Vital Signs Report shows, much progress has been made in our hospitals and healthcare facilities to protect patients from healthcare-associated infections. But, more work needs to be done, because many of these infections are caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria which are difficult, if not impossible to treat. The CDC believes clinicians are key to national progress in preventing infections. They have the power to change the direction of antibiotic resistance each and every time they care for their patients. It requires taking the appropriate steps every time.

We are in a race to slow resistance, and we can’t afford to let the “superbugs” outpace us, especially in healthcare settings.

Cliff-McDonald

Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University, and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University. Past positions have included Associate Investigator at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan and Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville. Dr. McDonald is a former officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service and former Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC where he currently serves as Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity in the same division. He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology/prevention of HAI’s, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and prevention of antimicrobial resistance.

C. diff. Spores and More™  Global Broadcasting Network –  producing educational programs dedicated to  C. difficile Infections and more —  brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

C. difficile Infection Study By Yale-led Team Estimate Transmission Rates In Three Healthcare Settings

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In The News

A Yale-led study estimates transmission rates inside and outside of hospitals, providing insight into different sources of the infection and how it might be better controlled.

Previous studies found that less than half of C. diff infections in hospitalized patients could be attributed to spread from other infected patients. “It’s traditionally been thought of as a hospital-focused disease, but there is increasing recognition of transmission outside the hospital,” said first author David P. Durham, associate research scientist in epidemiology.

To determine how the remaining infections spread, the Yale-led team developed a dynamic model to estimate transmission rates in three settings: hospitals, long-term care facilities, and the general community.

They found that hospitalized patients with symptoms of C. diff infection transmitted it at a rate 15 times higher than asymptomatic patients, even after accounting for infection control measures.

The rates of transmission among residents in long-term care facilities and in the community were 27% and 0.1% that of hospitalized patients, respectively.

“The latter rates are lower but still important sources of transmission, due to the much larger population outside of the hospital setting,” said co-author Jeffrey Townsend, associate professor of public health.

The findings point to the need to account for asymptomatic carriers and community sources in efforts to prevent and control C. diff infection, the researchers noted.

The study was published on March 16 in Emerging Infectious Diseases. Other authors include Yale professor Alison Galvani and Washington University researchers Erik Dubberke and Margaret Olsen.

 

Source:

http://news.yale.edu/2016/03/16/research-news-yale-study-estimates-transmission-deadly-c-diff-infection