Tag Archives: Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD

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We are pleased to welcome Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD to the
C Diff Foundation. 

Dr. Oneto presides as a Medical Advocate for the  
C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program teleconferencing sessions.

 

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Dr. Caterina Oneto is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the NYU Division of Gastroenterology, Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine. 

Fluent in Spanish, she graduated with a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the
Universidad de Valparaiso in Chile. She completed her residency in
Internal Medicine at Cabrini Medical Center, where she served also as Chief Resident, and later completed her Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 

With expertise in endoscopy, colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, liver and pancreatic diseases, Dr. Oneto’s special interests include IBD (Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), microbiota modification, treatment of Clostridium Difficile and FMT (Fecal Microbiota Transplantation). 

Scientific research demonstrates new evidence supporting Fecal Microbiota Transplant successful in treating C. difficile infections

Research published in the open access journal Microbiome offers new evidence for the success of fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) in treating severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a growing problem worldwide that leads to thousands of fatalities every year.

Research led by Michael Sadowsky, Alex Khoruts, and colleagues at the University of Minnesota in collaboration with the Rob Knight Lab at the University of Colorado, Boulder, reveals that healthy changes to a patient’s microbiome are sustained for up to 21 weeks after transplant, and has implications for the regulation of the treatment. Findings also demonstrate the dynamic nature of fecal microbiota in FMT donors and recipients.

In FMT, fecal matter is collected from a donor, purified, mixed with a saline solution and placed in a patient, usually by colonoscopy. In contrast to standard antibiotic therapies                                (e.g., Vancomycin)  which further disrupt intestinal microflora and may contribute to the recurrence of CDI, FMT restores the intestinal microbiome and healthy gut function.

Using DNA samples of healthy individuals from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) as a baseline, Sadowsky and his team compared changes in fecal microbial communities of recipients over time to the changes observed within samples from the donor. Significantly, the composition of gut microbes in the both donor and recipient groups varied over the course of the study, but remained within the normal range when compared to hundreds of samples collected by the HMP.

According to Sadowsky, the findings have important implications for a range of diseases associated with microbial imbalance, or dysbiosis, and could influence the regulatory regime surrounding FMT, currently treated as a drug by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA).

“The dynamic nature of fecal microbiota in both the donor and recipients suggests that the current framework of regulation, requiring consistent composition, may need to be reexamined for fecal transplantations,” says Michael Sadowsky. “Change in fecal microbial composition is consistent with normal responsiveness to shifts in the diet and other environment factors. Variability should be taken into account when comparing microbial composition in normal individuals to those with dysbiosis characteristic of disease states, especially when assessing clinical interventions and outcomes.

Also discovered in the research, the performance of frozen and fresh preparations of fecal material was indistinguishable. Though the sample was limited and warrants further study with a larger cohort, it has several implications for the widespread adoption of FMT. The frozen preparation greatly simplifies the standardization and distribution of the fecal material. It also facilitates long-term storage of donor material for future study and makes FMT accessible to a greater number of physicians and patients. Finally, it offers advantages over fresh material in the testing of fecal samples for pathogens, which in some cases can take several weeks to complete.

While FMT is particularly successful in patients who suffer from recurrent CDI, University of Minnesota researchers led by Sadowsky and Dr. Alex Khoruts are currently preparing for a clinical trial using FMT to improve insulin sensitivity in pre-diabetic patients and to treat metabolic syndrome.

 

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-04/uom-nes040915.php

Lee Jones, Rebiotix and Glenn Taylor, Taymount Clinic Discuss Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) AKA Microbiota Restoration Therapy, Research to Clinical, on C diff Radio

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015Join us on Tuesday, April 7th at 11:00 a.m.  Pacific / 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time

As guests, Ms. Lee Jones, CEO Rebiotix, Inc.  and Glenn Taylor, Microbiologist at Taymount Clinic  discuss

Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) AKA Microbiota Restoration Therapy, Research to Clinical

 

 

Ms. Lee Jones, Founder, President and CEO of Rebiotix Inc, has over thirty years of experience in the medical technology industry in large and small companies and academia. Rebiotix is developing a new category of biologic drugs that use live human-derived organisms to treat disease. Lead candidate RBX2660 (microbiota suspension) is currently undergoing clinical study for recurrent C. diff. infection.

Mr. Glenn Taylor is the Microbiologist at the Taymount Clinic just outside London in the UK. He has spent five years researching the commensal colonization of bacteria in the human digestive system. Listen in as both guests discuss the Fecal or Faecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT),also known as Microbiota Restoration Therapy to treat recurrent C. diff. infections and more – Research to Clinical.

Each C. diff. Spores and More” episode becomes a pod-cast and can be easily accessed through our website:

http://cdifffoundation.org/c-diff-radio/

C. diff. Spores and More” spotlights world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more.

Through their interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

 

Please join us Tuesdays in listening to the educational episodes of C. diff. Spores and More”

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C difficile infection; AdvancingBio in Mather, CA Provides a Resource For Healthcare Partners to Treat Patients With Recurrent C. diff. With Fecal Microbiota Transplant

A resource for patients seeking FMT information:

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More than 350,000 cases of Clostridium difficile(C. diff), a dangerous and potentially fatal gastrointestinal bacterial infection, are diagnosed in the United States every year, killing over 15,000 people.

 

AdvancingBio, a not-for-profit organization that offers a treatment to patients suffering from C.diff, announces its launch with the opening of its stool collection and processing facility in Mather, CA, near Sacramento. The facility provides a unique resource for healthcare partners to treat patients with recurrent C. diff using Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT).

C. diff is a bacterium that can cause swelling and irritation of the large intestine, or colon. This inflammation, known as colitis, can lead to severe diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps. The infection is most common in people who are taking antibiotics or have taken them recently, but it also can be transmitted to other people when they come into contact with infected patients or contaminated surfaces, especially if proper hygiene is not practiced.

“There is an emerging need for resources to treat patients suffering from C. difficile, which can be a very aggressive and life-threatening infection,” said Donny Dumani, MD, who oversees all medical aspects of AdvancingBio. “AdvancingBio was created with the mission to provide services to those in need. Our focus is to provide vital resources to healthcare partners who in turn perform fecal microbiota transplants to heal the growing number of patients with C. diff.”

FMT involves the transfer of a healthy microbiome, or the good bacteria present in carefully screened and tested donor stool, including the totality of microorganisms and their collective genetic material. FMT has been shown to deliver a 90+% cure rate.

The donor screening and donation process takes approximately less than 30 minutes. Donors will receive pre-donation educational material and instructions, then proceed to a confidential medical history review by a licensed AdvancingBio staff member. A blood draw will be conducted for infectious disease testing, and then the donor will be provided a clean, private facility for the donation. Eligibility requirements to donate stool are assessed at the time of donation and include feeling well and healthy, being free from cold and flu-like symptoms for 14 days, being between 18 – 65 years old and having a Body Mass Index less than 35.

“The immediate availability of thoroughly screened products that meet the current FDA requirements for our patients with recurring C. difficile is more than welcome,” said R. Erick Pecha, MD, partner at Gastroenterology Medical Clinic in Folsom. “It is long overdue.”

AdvancingBio is open to donors Monday through Friday, from 7:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. PT. For more information or to become a donor, please visit advancingbio.org or call (844) 426-7264.

About AdvancingBio
Established in 2015, AdvancingBio is a not-for-profit organization that operates a stool collection and processing facility which provides a unique resource for healthcare partners to treat the growing number of patients suffering from Clostridium difficile infection (C. diff). More than 350,000 cases of C. diff are diagnosed in the U.S. every year, and over 15,000 people die each year from this aggressive bacterial infection. Schedule an appointment or learn more at 844.426.7264 or advancingbio.org

C. diff. and Healthcare-Associated Infections Discussed Live on C. diff. Radio

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#CdiffRadio

C Diff Foundation, Sponsor, with Founder            Nancy C. Caralla, Executive Director and               Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, Chairperson of the Research and Development Community will be broadcasting live on Tuesdays delivering the most up-to-date information pertaining to a leading super-bug/ Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI),  C. difficile, with additional HAI’s, and a variety of related healthcare topics.

Topic experts will be joining your hosts to discuss prevention, treatments, clinical trials, and environmental safety products on a global level.

Tune in Tuesdays beginning March 3rd at 11 AM Pacific Time (2 PM Eastern Time, 7 PM UK) on the VoiceAmerica network  http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more