Category Archives: Nutrition

Lactose Free Vanilla Pudding Recipe

vanillapuddingglass

Pudding is one of those easy and quick comforting desserts that can be prepared anytime  and enjoyed as an after school snack or dessert. This dairy-free (Lactose Free) pudding recipe is always a hit and it’s easy.

 

Ingredients:  (makes 4 Servings)  (t. = teaspoon, T=Tablespoon)

 

  • 2/3 cups white granulated sugar
  • ¼ t. salt
  • ¼ cup cornstarch
  • 2 ½ cups unsweetened plain almond milk or other non-dairy milk alternatives   (Soy, Cashew, Rice, Coconut, etc..).
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1 t. vanilla extract
 Directions:
  1. In a small saucepan, whisk together the sugar and salt.
  2. In a small dish, combine the cornstarch with 2 T. of the almond milk, mixing until dissolved. Add the cornstarch mixture, remaining milk of your choice and egg yolks to the saucepan, whisking until combined.
  3. Cook the pudding over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens and bubbles just begin to form on the surface.
  4. Whisking constantly, turn down the heat to low and cook for about 1 minute more.
  5. Pour the pudding through a fine sieve into a heatproof dish and stir in the vanilla extract.
  6. Place plastic wrap directly on the surface of the pudding and chill at least 2 hours before serving.

 

 

Food For Thought, An Overview Of a Low FODMAP Diet and the Importance Of a Registered Dietitian

The FODMAP Diet is being discussed at greater lengths with patients experiencing gastrointestinal (GI)  challenges and alterations with their GI systems.

 

There is not a specific “C. diff. Diet,” as Clostridium difficile is an infection, however; we know and understand that the G.I. system is quite effected by this infection causing a disruption in normal dietary intake and difficulties maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition on a daily basis.

This brings us to the Low FODMAP Diet. What is it? What does FODMAP stand for? Can it benefit patients diagnosed with C.diff. ? All good questions and this is yet one more topic patients can discuss with their healthcare providers providing their care and with a Registered Dietician with a solid background in Gastroenterology and utilizing the FODMAP diet plan with patients.

FODMAP is an acronym for:
Fermentable (produces gas in the intestines)
Oligosaccharides (fructans and galactans/GOS)
Disaccharides (lactose)
Monosaccharides (excess fructose)
And
Polyols (sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, maltitol, mannitol, xylitol, and isomalt)

FODMAP’s are sugars – the carbohydrates – in foods eaten and are poorly absorbed by the GI system.  The intestinal bacteria in the gut can react negatively to these types of foods and cause abdominal bloating, accompanied by gas,  developing pain and even diarrhea and/or constipation.

When foods high in FODMAP are eliminated from the daily diet of patients diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), patients begin to witness a decline in the negative GI (gastrointestinal) symptoms.  By reducing the intake of FODMAP foods may also help reduce GI symptoms for patients diagnosed with Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis (UC) or Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

  • Please Note:  Before changing diets, always speak to the healthcare professional/s monitoring and treating any/all gastrointestinal symptoms.

What foods contain FODMAP’s ?

Here is a partial listing of food high in FODMAP:

  • Fructans and Galactans/GOS:  Wheat, Rye, Barley, Onion, Garlic, Inulin/Chicory root, Most Legumes (bean sources), Artichoke, Soy Milk, Rice Milk, Coconut Milk.
  • Lactose:  Milk, Yogurt, Ice Cream, Soft Cheeses such as Ricotta and Cottage Cheese.
  • Fructose: A major ingredient in many processed foods is High Fructose Corn Syrup, Honey, Agave, and Fruits such as Applies, Pears, and Watermelon.
  • Polyols:  Mushrooms, Cauliflower, Sugar-Free Gum and Candy, and a few fruits such as Peaches, Plums, and Cherries.

Here is a partial listing of foods that are allowed when following a FODMAP Diet:

  • Grains:  Rice, Oats, Gluten-Free Pasta, Breads, and Cereals.
  • Fruites: Oranges, Bananas, Grapes, Honeydew Melon, Cantaloupe Melon, Kiwi, Pineapple and Berries except blackberries.
  • Vegetables:  Carrots, Eggplant, Zucchini, Peppers, Green Beans, Lettuce, Cucumber, Potato, and Tomatoes to name a few.
  • Protein:  Chicken, Turkey, Fish, Eggs, Beef, Pork, Tofu, Nut Butters.
  • Dairy: Lactose FREE Milk products, If there is not a nut allergy then proceed to Nut Milks such as Almond and Cashew Milk, Lactose Free Yogurt, Hard Cheese like Chedder and Feta.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Registered Dietitians (RD) with expertise and familiar with this diet help patients live better with any gastrointestinal diagnosis successfully.

Please note: This diet is a two step diet and consists of the elimination process and then the reintroduction of foods back into the diet.

The support and guidance gained by patients working directly with a RD will find this diet less restricting and experience the alleviation of negative symptoms caused by many food items.

The role of a RD is to guide patients and their families to eating nutritious foods and to assist in creating healthy, enjoyable meals that will promote a healthy GI system and reduce the symptoms.

To learn more about Registered Dietitians please take a moment to click on the link below to view a short video and gain a better understanding of the important role a RD provides in promoting well being and improving patient care in the healthcare system.

https://cdifffoundation.org/2013/07/18/what-a-registered-dietitian-can-do-for-you/

Karen Factor, RD is the Chairperson of Nutrition and Wellness Committee
of the C Diff Foundation and is available through the  C.diff. Support Sessions offered each month.  Register for a FREE support session with Karen by clicking on the following link:

https://cdifffoundation.org/cdiffsupport/

 

 

Resources: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

ProNourish Nutritional Drink Information For Healthcare Professionals — For Patients With Food Intolerance And Digestive Discomfort

*Please note – The
C Diff Foundation does not endorse any product and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. If you have questions, please contact the companies directly. Thank you.

 

FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS **

………………………

For Patients with Food Intolerance
ProNourish Nutritional Drink is a unique option for patients who suffer with digestive discomfort and are following an exclusion diet.

It was specifically formulated with the guidance of healthcare professionals to be compliant with a Low FODMAP Diet and is Low FODMAP Certified by Monash University. Monash University Low Fodmap Certified
Benefits in every bottle:
Low in FODMAPs*
3 g of Fiber
15 g of High Quality Protein
25 Essential Vitamins and Minerals
Suitable for Lactose Intolerance**

NO Gluten
NO High Fructose Corn Syrup
NO Sugar Alcohols or Artificial Colors
NO Inulin
NO Fructooligosaccharides
ProNourish Nutritional Drink helps make following a Low FODMAP Diet easier by providing a balanced mini-meal or snack without the ingredients that might trigger symptoms of digestive discomfort. Its just one more way Nestlé Health Science strives to help nourish patients quality of life through the power of nutrition.
HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS ONLY: Order Free Samples!
For Your Patients
To get your FREE samples, use promo code PRON-13851-1016.

Find out more about ProNourish Drink at ProNourish.com

or visit LowFODMAPcentral.com

For information and handouts for your patients.

Stop by the ProNourish Drink booth during these upcoming events!

2016 Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo (FNCE®): October 16–18
(booth #2951)
2016 ACG American College of Gastroenterology Meeting: October 16–18
(booth #1114)

*Formulated to be low in specific carbs (called FODMAPs) that can be difficult for some people to digest.

**Not for individuals with Galactosemia.

Monash University Low FODMAP Certified trademarks used under license by Nestlé.

A strict Low FODMAP Diet should only be commenced under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Signs That Tell If You Are Dehydrated

With the summer season at its peak and heat indexes climbing each day topped by a diagnosis of a C. difficile infection, dehydration can occur quickly.

Here is a short list of major signs to watch for that will indicate the body is low on fluid and prompt attention is needed to gain proper hydration.  Dehydration is dangerous and can even be life-threatening.

**  When any one is unable to maintain adequate hydration due to vomiting, diarrhea, excessive perspiring, over-exposure in hot weather — seek medical attention as soon as possible.

 

Signs of Dehydration (1)

Muscle Cramping:  The hotter you get, the more likely you are to get muscle cramps, and that’s from a pure heat effect on the muscles. As the muscles work harder and harder, they can seize up from the heat itself. Changes in the electrolytes, changes in the sodium and potassium can lead to muscle cramping.

Fever and Chills

Food Cravings: especially something sweet due to the inability for the liver to release glycogen.  Craving something sweet? Reach for a snack that has high water content. Most fruits and vegetables have high water content and will help maintain hydration.

How to Check If You’re Dehydrated

Here are two other ways to check if your body is dehydrated.

  • Try this skin test. First, use two fingers to grab a roll of skin on the back of your hand (between where your watch sits and where your fingers start), advises Higgins. Pull the skin up about ½ to one centimeter high and then let the skin go. The skin should spring back to its normal position in less than a couple of seconds. Higgins says that if the skin bounces back slowly, you might be dehydrated.
  • Check your urine. If you’re well-hydrated your urine will be mostly clear with a tinge of yellow, Higgins explains. Yellow, chardonnay, and orange are the “warning” colors to watch for. When your body is about three percent dehydrated your urine will be noticeably yellow. When your body is about five percent dehydrated, your urine will appear chardonnay-colored. When your body is more than five percent dehydrated – which is considered severely dehydrated – your urine will appear orange.

Tips for Staying Hydrated

  • Keep your water bottle handy and sip throughout the day.
  • Spice up plain water. Add a splash of fruit juice or chunks of fresh or frozen fruit,
  • Try different teas. unsweetened decaffeinated flavored teas, which are available in lots of different flavors, they all count towards your daily fluid goal.
  • Makeover your snacks. Refrain from dry, carb snacks like chips, pretzels, and crackers which have a very low water content, reach for fresh or frozen fruit, yogurt, healthy smoothies, celery with peanut butter, and cut veggies with hummus,
  • Pile on the produce. Set a goal to make half of the meals plated with produce.  Vegetable and fruit servings will supply water as well as a hearty dose of vitamins, minerals.
  • Room temperature or temped water/beverages. When it comes to fluids, refrain from ingesting  fluids with extreme cold temperatures. When ice water comes into the stomach it constricts the arteries surrounding the stomach, which help the stomach function properly and help with water absorption and Ice water will just sit in the stomach until it warms up. If you hear water swishing around in your stomach, it means the water is not getting absorbed. Fluids that are cool or room temperature are better options.
  • Refrain from alcoholic beverages and high caffeinated drinks.

What is the daily total water intake, which includes water gained from foods and other beverages like tea and milk?  The Institute of Medicine recommends that most women get about 2.7 liters of water a day (or about 12 cups), and most men get about 3.7 liters a day (or about 15 cups).

  • Always discuss fluid intake with healthcare providers as cardiac and kidney conditions may alter the amount of fluids allowed on a daily basis.   When in doubt, contact a healthcare provider or visit a local clinic/hospital for complete assessment.  Stay Safe!

(1) http://www.everydayhealth.com/news/unusual-signs-of-dehydration/

Simple and Basic Vegetable Soup Recipe Because “Soup Is Good Food”

Simple & Basic Vegetable Soup

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons butter

2 large carrots, peeled and diced

3 stalks celery, diced

1 (28 ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, chopped, juice reserved

1 teaspoon dried parsley or fresh parsley

2 quarts Beef broth OR Vegetable broth OR Chicken broth

DIRECTIONS:

In a large pot over medium heat, melt the butter.

ADD the carrots and celery to the melted butter and cook until semi-soft.

Stir in tomatoes with their juice, and  parsley.

Pour in beef OR vegetable OR chicken  broth.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes, until vegetables are tender and flavors are well blended.

OPTIONS:

Add 1/2 cup of dry uncooked pasta noodles of choice to the broth and vegetables and cook for 20 minutes until soft

Add 1 cup of cooked chicken cut into cubes for added nutrition (protein) OR cooked beef cut into cubes/small pieces for added nutritional value.