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C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

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September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Cdiff2015-1Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

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REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

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Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

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 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

Follow us on Twitter
@cdiffFoundation
#Cdiff2016

Lab Testing Is Critical For Persistent Diarrhea To Accurately Diagnose and Treat

An accurate diagnosis via laboratory testing is critical for effectively treating persistent diarrhea lasting more than 2 weeks, as the often poorly recognized syndrome can be caused by different pathogens than acute diarrhea, according to a clinical review recently published in JAMA.

“I’d like to educate doctors about the importance of taking the history and assessing duration of illness,” Herbert L. DuPont, MD, Director of the Center for Infectious Diseases at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, said in a press release. “For acute diarrhea, the lab has a minimal role, restricted to patients passing bloody stools. If a patient has had diarrhea for 2 weeks or more, the doctor should focus on the cause of the disease through laboratory testing, with an emphasis on parasites.”

DuPont performed a review of relevant literature published up to February 2016 to provide an overview of the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and management of persistent diarrhea in immunocompetent patients.

Common causes of persistent diarrhea

Although acute diarrhea is usually caused by viruses or toxins, persistent diarrhea is usually caused by bacteria or parasites, DuPont wrote.

Protozoa are the most common parasitic cause of persistent diarrhea, including Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora, whereas Entamoeba histolytica, Cystoisospora belli, Dientamoeba fragilis, Strongyloides stercoralis and Microsporidia species are less common.

Bacterial species that may cause persistent diarrhea include enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, Shigella, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Arcobacter butzleri and Aeromonas species.

Clostridium difficile can cause recurrent diarrhea in patients receiving antibiotics in health care settings, and viral agents, such as norovirus, and helminths can also cause persistent diarrhea.

“Parasites are more common in the developing world. Consequently, persistent diarrhea is more common in these areas and in local populations or people traveling to these locations,” DuPont wrote. “Persistent diarrhea occurs in approximately 3% of international travelers to developing regions.” Parasitic infection is less common in industrialized regions, where foodborne and waterborne pathogens and C. difficile are more common causes, he added.

Persistent diarrhea can also have noninfectious causes, including lactase deficiency, ingested osmotic substances, postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, functional bowel diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, ischemic or microscopic colitis, carbohydrate malabsorption, cancer and other idiopathic illnesses.

Complete evaluation, new diagnostic methods

Duration of illness should be determined by health care providers when developing an evaluation plan, and the clinical assessment of patients with persistent diarrhea lasting more than 14 days should include a complete history, physical examination and diagnostic testing for infectious or noninfectious etiologies.

“The longer the duration of illness, the more likely it is that parasitic pathogens or noninfectious causes will eventually be identified,” DuPont wrote.

Previously, bacterial pathogens were identified using stool culture-based methods, and parasites are often identified using commercial enzyme immunoassay tests or microscopy. However, the recent advent of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platforms enable simultaneous testing for a number of bacterial, viral and parasitic enteropathogens by identifying their DNA sequences.

The xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (Luminex Corp) tests for 14 viruses, bacteria, and parasites and the FilmArray GI panel (Biofire Diagnostics) tests for 22 viruses, bacteria, and parasites.

“These new tests are easy to use, are capable of detecting a broad range of pathogens and represent a significant improvement over culture-based diagnostic approaches,” DuPont said in the press release. “The technology needs to be more widely available. Diagnosis is critical when treating persistent diarrhea.” However, false positive results are problematic, he wrote.

Treatment depends on diagnosis

After treating any dehydration with oral rehydration therapy, a laboratory test should be performed to determine the cause of persistent diarrhea to determine the appropriate treatment. However, a single 1,000 mg dose of empirical azithromycin is appropriate concurrent to the lab test for adults who have traveled to the developing world, as bacterial causes that lab tests cannot usually identify are common.

Although antimicrobial agents are recommended for a number of pathogens, the antibiotic choice should be optimized based on the pathogen’s susceptibility to prevent antimicrobial resistance.

TO READ THE ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW:

The C Diff Foundation Offers Patients, Family Members, and Clinicians Global Community Support

We are pleased to announce the

C. diff. Global Community Support Program —   an extension of  our

existing patient program – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program.

Our Foundation Members and Medical Advocates, leading the support groups, via: teleconferencing, will now have the ability to offer support to patients, families, clinicians, and individuals seeking support —  in  the U.S. and 57 countries.

Below you will find the list of countries, with their local cities,  able
to participate in our teleconferencing support groups:

Argentina – Buenos Aires and Cordoba
Australia – Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney
Austria – Countrywide, Vienna
Bahrain – Countrywide
Belgium – Brussels
Brazil – Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
Bulgaria – Sofia
Canada – Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Toronto,
Vancouver, Winnipeg.
Chile – Santiago
China – Beijing
Columbia – Bogota
Costa Rica – National VolP
Croatia – Zagreb
Cyprus – Nicosia
Czech Republic – Prague
Denmark – Countrywide
Dominican Republic – Santo Domingo
El Salvador – San Salvador
Finland – Helsinki
France – Marseille, Paris
Germany – Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich
Greece – Athens
Hong Kong – Countrywide
Hungary – Budapest
India – Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai
Ireland – Dublin, National VolP
Israel – Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
Italy – Milan, Rome
Japan – Tokyo
Latvia- Riga
Lithuania – Vilnius
Luxembourg – Countrywide
Malaysia – Kuala Lumpur
Malta – Countrywide
Mexico – Guadalajara, Mexico City, Monterrey
Netherlands – Amsterdam
New Zealand – Auckland
Norway – Oslo
Panama – Panama City
Peru – Lima
Poland – Warsaw
Portugal – Countrywide
Puerto Rico – Aguadilla
Romania – Bucharest
Russia – Moscow
Singapore – Singapore
Slovakia – Bratislava
Slovenia – Ljubljana
South Africa – Cape Town, Johannesburg
South Korea – Seoul
Spain – Barcelona, Madrid
Sweden – Malmo, Stockholm
Switzerland – Bern, Geneva, Zurich
Turkey – Istanbul
Ukraine – National VolP
United Kingdom – Birmingham, Edinburgh, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, National.
Venezuela – Caracas

Registration will remain the same – through the main number (919) 201-1512
or utilizing the nationwide U.S. Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF, or from the Foundation website
http://www.cdifffoundation.org C. diff. Global Community Support page.

Support is only a phone call away worldwide

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C diff Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network and Guests Dr. Srinivasan and Dr. Hicks of the CDC Discuss Antibiotic Resistance

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C. diff. Spores and More , Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio show discuss antibiotic resistance and what everyone can do to join in the fight against it with guests Dr. Arjun Srinivasan and
Dr. Lauri Hicks on Tuesday, February 9th at 10 AM Pacific Time on VoiceAmerica Health and Wellness Channel

Bringing guests together, such as Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD and Dr. Lauri Hicks, DO from the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one of the leading government healthcare organizations in the U.S., and internationally recognized experts on antibiotic resistance has built a loyal listenership and continue to inform and educate listeners’ worldwide.

C.diff. Spores and More” is broadcast live every Tuesday at 10 AM Pacific Time on the VoiceAmerica Health and Wellness channel, officially sponsored by Clorox Healthcare. Archived C. diff. Spores and More shows can be found Here.

“I am so proud to be the Senior Executive Producer of the “C. diff. Spores and More,” program as it continues to raise awareness, on a global level, of the overuse of antibiotics. Having guests; Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD and Dr. Lauri Hicks, DO truly affect change in both the leadership and education guiding the public and raising awareness in many areas of health care,” stated Robert Ciolino, Senior Executive Producer VoiceAmerica.

About The C diff Foundation Executive Director
Nancy C Caralla, hosts “C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network with a team focus on educating, and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety – and more — worldwide.

For information please visit www.cdifffoundation.org

Listen in on Tuesday, February 9th at 10:00 Pacific Time–

https://cdifffoundation.org/c-diff-radio/

Stop the Spread of Antibiotic Resistance and C. difficile Infections

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Antibiotic-resistant germs cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in the US.

Up to 70% fewer patients will get CRE over 5 years if facilities coordinate to protect patients.

Preventing infections and improving antibiotic prescribing could save 37,000 lives from drug-resistant infections over 5 years.

Problem:  Germs spread between patients and across health care facilities.

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Antibiotic resistance is a threat.

 

  • Nightmare germs called CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) can cause deadly infections and have become resistant to all or nearly all antibiotics we have today. CRE spread between health care facilities like hospitals and nursing homes when appropriate actions are not taken.
  • MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections commonly cause pneumonia and sepsis that can be deadly.
  • The germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause HAIs, including bloodstream infections. Strains resistant to almost all antibiotics have been found in hospitalized patients.
  • These germs are some of the most deadly resistant germs identified as “urgent” and “serious” threats.
C. difficile infections are at historically high rates.
  • C. difficile (Clostridium difficile), a germ commonly found in health care facilities, can be picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread from a healthcare provider’s hands.
  • Most C. difficile is not resistant to antibiotics, but when a person takes antibiotics, some good germs are destroyed. Antibiotic use allows C. difficile to take over, putting patients at high risk for deadly diarrhea.
Working together is vital.
  • Infections and antibiotic use in one facility affect other facilities because of patient transfers.
  • Public health leadership is critical so that facilities are alerted to data about resistant infections, C. difficile, or outbreaks in the area, and can target effective prevention strategies.
  • When facilities are alerted to increased threat levels, they can improve antibiotic use and infection control actions so that patients are better protected.
  • National efforts to prevent infections and improve antibiotic prescribing could prevent 619,000 antibiotic-resistant and C. difficile infections over 5 years.

 

  • “Patients and their families may wonder how they can help stop the spread of infections,” says Michael Bell, M.D., deputy director of CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. “When receiving health care, tell your doctor if you have been hospitalized in another facility or country, wash your hands often, and always insist that everyone have clean hands before touching you.”

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Antibiotic-resistant germs, those that no longer respond to the drugs designed to kill them, cause more than 2 million illnesses and at least 23,000 deaths each year in the United States. C. difficile caused close to half a million illnesses in 2011, and an estimated 15,000 deaths a year are directly attributable to C. difficile infections.

 The report recommends the following coordinated, two-part approach to turn this data into action that prevents illness and saves lives:

  1. Public health departments track and alert health care facilities to drug-resistant germ outbreaks in their area and the threat of germs coming from other facilities, and
  2. Health care facilities work together and with public health authorities to implement shared infection control actions to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs and C. difficile between facilities.

“Antibiotic resistant infections in health care settings are a growing threat in the United States, killing thousands and thousands of people each year,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “We can dramatically reduce these infections if health care facilities, nursing homes, and public health departments work together to improve antibiotic use and infection control so patients are protected.”

The promising news is that CDC modeling projects that a coordinated approach—that is, health care facilities and health departments in an area working together—could prevent up to 70 percent of life-threatening carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections over five years. Additional estimates show that national infection control and antibiotic stewardship efforts led by federal agencies, health care facilities, and public health departments could prevent 619,000 antibiotic-resistant and C. difficile infections and save 37,000 lives over five years.

During the next five years, with investments, CDC’s efforts to combat C. difficile infections and antibiotic resistance under the National Strategy to Combat Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, in collaboration with other federal partners, will enhance national capabilities for antibiotic stewardship, outbreak surveillance, and antibiotic resistance prevention. These efforts hold the potential to cut the incidence of C. difficile, health care CRE, and MRSA bloodstream infections by at least half.

The proposed State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs (Protect Programs) would implement this coordinated approach. These Protect Programs would be made possible by the funding proposed in the President’s FY 2016 budget request, supporting work with health care facilities in all 50 states to detect and prevent both antibiotic-resistant germs and C. difficile infections. The FY 2016 budget would also accelerate efforts to improve antibiotic stewardship in health care facilities.