Tag Archives: C diff cleaning

Cdiff Spores and More With Dr. Mark Stibich Discuss Healthcare-associated Infections Being Successfully Eliminated By Xenex Germ Zapping Robots, UV Disinfection Services

 

Listen To The May 17th, 2016 PodCast

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C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This episode——

“Xenex Germ Zapping Robots, UV Disinfection Services”

With Our Guest:       Dr. Mark Stibich, PhD

Join us as guest, and co-founder of Xenex, Dr. Mark Stibich Epidemiologist and Chief Scientific Officer, discusses UV Disinfection with Xenex UV Disinfecting Systems and Germ Zapping Robots making a clean sweep across the globe zapping ‪‎C.diff‬. and all harmful germs that can cause pain, suffering, and double digits in the already stressed healthcare industry.

 

MORE ABOUT OUR GUEST:

Dr Mark Stibich, a co-founder of Xenex, Mark oversees scientific research, new technology development, and protocol design. An epidemiologist who has published many scientific papers about Pulsed Xenon technology, Mark is also an inventor on multiple patents. Originally from Dayton, OH, Mark graduated from Yale and the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, where he earned a Masters in Health Science and PhD.  Mark’s interest in public health has taken him to many distant countries. He served as a Peace Corps health volunteer and then trained Peace Corps health volunteers in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. He has conducted research in Russia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, South Africa, Kenya, the U. S., and Brazil. In addition, he has received grants for and directed HIV/AIDS research and intervention projects throughout Russia and has been a consultant with the USAID project.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™  is made possible through our official  Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

CloroxHealthcare_72

 

C. diff. Spores and More Returns To Live Broadcasting January 19th With Guests Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD and Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD

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HAPPY NEW YEAR!

C. diff. Spores and More ™”

returns to live broadcasting on

January 19th, 2016

 

 

 

Join us  at 10 a.m. Pacific Time, 11 a.m. Mountain Time, 12 p.m. Central Time,
and   1 p.m. Eastern Time.

with our two guests:

Dr. Caterina Oneto, MD  –  a Clinical Assistant Professor within the NYU Division of Gastroenterology, Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine. 

Fluent in Spanish, she graduated with a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the
Universidad de Valparaiso in Chile. She completed her residency in
Internal Medicine at Cabrini Medical Center, where she served also as Chief Resident, and later completed her Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. With expertise in endoscopy, colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, liver and pancreatic diseases, Dr. Oneto’s special interests include IBD (Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis), IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), microbiota modification, treatment of Clostridium Difficile and FMT (Fecal Microbiota Transplantation).

AND

Dr. Paul Feuerstadt, MD – A native of Long Island, New York, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology, with distinction in research and graduated Summa Cum Laude. Following completion of his undergraduate training, Dr. Feuerstadt attended the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in Manhattan, New York where he earned his Medical Doctor degree and stayed at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell medical center for his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Following completion of his residency Dr. Feuerstadt then moved on to the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York for his clinical fellowship training.

Throughout Dr. Feuerstadt’s training and practice he has been actively involved in research and other academic pursuits. His areas of interest include ischemic diseases of the gut and chronic diarrheal syndromes with a specific focus on Clostridium difficile infection. He has presented his research extensively at national meetings and has authored and co-authored many manuscripts and textbook chapters. Another passion of Dr. Feuerstadt’s is teaching, frequently mentoring the fellows in the Division of Digestive Disease at Yale-New Haven Hospital where he holds a clinical appointment as a Clinical Instructor of Medicine. His clinical practice is his ultimate passion filling the majority of his work time seeing a broad spectrum of patients with gastrointestinal and hepatic disease. Dr. Feuerstadt is affiliated with the
St. Raphael campus of Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Milford Hospital seeing outpatients in his offices in Hamden and Milford, Connecticut.

* All “C. diff. Spores and More ™”   episodes and archived programs are available on demand by accessing the following link:

http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

Hard Facts: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released today, February 25, 2015, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

• More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes.

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection. Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a
C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.

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Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the
Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility.

This new study finds that 1 out of every 5 patients with the Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI), C. diff., experience a recurrence of the infection and 1 out of every 9 patients over the age of 65 diagnosed with a HAI – C. diff. infection died within 30 days of being diagnosed. Older Americans are quite vulnerable to this life-threatening diarrhea infection. The CDC study also found that women and Caucasian individuals are at an increased risk of acquiring a C. diff. infection. The CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH said, “C. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year.” “These infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.”

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  C Diff Foundation supports hundreds of communities worldwide by sharing the Foundation’s mission and  raising C. diff. awareness with healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The C Diff Foundation volunteer Advocates are greatly appreciated and continue to create positive changes by sharing their time  aiding in the success of our mission “Raising C. diff. awareness ™”  worldwide.

C. diff. Spores and More ™“ spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the
C. diff.
community and more.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

Join us and listen in beginning January 19th, 2016  on Tuesdays  for educational episodes of                                       C. diff. Spores and More™”

View the programs and radio information by clicking on the link below:

www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

 

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

 

Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™ is made possible through our official Corporate Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

CloroxHealthcare_72

Volunteer Advocates Raise C.diff. Awareness July 27 – August 9th at Troy (PA) and Chemung County Fair (NY)

It is with great pleasure to announce CDF representatives volunteering and advocating with
the C. Diff. Foundation,  “Raising C. diff. Awareness”  providing educational information to the thousands of fair-goers in North Central Pennsylvania and South Central New York.

The representatives will also be advocating on how to prevent acquiring a
Healthcare-Acquired Infection (HAI)  from  July 27th-August 9th.

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from a Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infection in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.
Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of an initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection.
Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of Healthcare-Associated Infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone. Approximately
two-thirds of C. diff. infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, only 24% of the total cases occurred in patients while they were hospitalized. The study also revealed that almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals and the remainder of individuals acquired the Healthcare-Associated infection, C. diff., recently discharged from a health care facility. his does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  This data confirmed the necessity
to support communities through education and advocating,  sharing the C Diff Foundation’s mission and  Raising C. diff.  Awareness – working towards a shared goal;  To witness a reduction of newly diagnosed C. diff. cases by 2020.

Come visit the C Diff Foundation’s booth at the Troy Fair in the lower meadow of Alparon Park just off Route 14 in Troy, Pennsylvania, Monday, July 27th through Saturday, August 1st from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.

The Foundation representatives will also “Raising C. diff.  Awareness”
at the Chemung County Fair commercial building, just off Route 17 in
Horseheads, New York,
Tuesday, August 4th through Sunday, August 9th from
10 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will be a drawing at each fair for a basket filled with hand soaps, and other freebies will also be available.

For more information, please contact the C Diff Foundation at 919-201-1512 or
local C Diff Foundation Representative; Heather Clark at 607-821-0575.

C. diff. Infection (CDI) Prevention Is A Multidisciplinary Effort In All Settings

HandsaroundworldPreventing a C. diff. infection (CDI) is a multidisciplinary effort in every setting.

It requires everyone, from physicians to nurses, pharmacy to the microbiology laboratory, housekeeping to hospital leadership, family members, patients, visitors, and especially infection prevention and control staff, to do their part.

Let us not dismiss the importance of hand hygiene (hand-washing) or environmental disinfection in all settings…..from  healthcare facilities to outpatient clinics to physician offices to the home.

Soap and water should always be used preferentially over alcohol-based hand rubs if the hands become grossly contaminated or if gloves were not worn.

https://cdifffoundation.org/category/infection-control/

Enhanced cleaning of the environment with sporicidal methods is clearly indicated if your facility has issues with CDI cases occurring repeatedly in the same room. Before changing the approach to cleaning the environment, it is important to make sure that the environment is being cleaned in the first place—the sporicidal agent will not have the opportunity to work if it is never applied. 

https://cdifffoundation.org/category/epa-registered-c-diff-kill-cleaning-products-environmental-safety/

For Home Care Information:  https://cdifffoundation.org/category/home-care/

Existing data indicate that the most effective methods to prevent CDI in hospitals are:

Improving antimicrobial (antibiotic) prescribing; Promptly identifying patients with CDI and place them on contact precautions, and Making sure that healthcare workers are compliant with contact precautions, including gowns, gloves, use of dedicated equipment whenever possible, and ensuring that non-dedicated equipment is adequately cleaned between patients.

https://cdifffoundation.org/category/antibiotic-news/

 

 

 

Sources:Medscape, CDC

C. difficile Care At Home

cleaning-supplies

C.diff infection treated in home environment

Laundry:
While combating C. diff at home, it is recommended that soiled linens be handled as little as possible to prevent microbial contamination of persons handling the linen. Heavily soiled linens should be laundered separately and not with other clothing or other linens. Satisfactory Laundering has been achieved in “hot” water temperatures cycles in home washers while utilizing chlorine bleach (amount varies with manufacturer and water capacity in each washer) and laundry soap.

Hand-washing with soap and warm water over 20 seconds, scrubbing between fingers, and tops of hands, rinsing with fingers pointed downward, using a dry, clean towel to dry both hands and a dry towel to turn off the sink faucets. This hand-washing process demonstrates the greatest efficiency in removing Clostridium difficile (C Diff) spores and should be performed preferentially over the use of alcohol-based hand rubs when contact with C Diff is suspected or likely. The recommended length of time to wash hands is a minimum of 20 to 30 seconds. Singing one rendition of Happy Birthday usually suffices the time suggested to achieve good hand-washing results.
* 70% isopropyl showed NO inactivation of C. difficile spores at exposure times of 5m, 15m, and 30m.

Cleaning a Home Environment:
What needs to be cleaned at home using EPA approved germicide for routine cleaning? All hard surfaces, which include the bedside commode (if applicable), bed-rails (if applicable), All Bathroom sinks, floors, tub/showers, toilets, doorknobs, light switch plates, shower doors. Frequently touched or high-touch surfaces including computer touch-pads, monitor cables, monitors, Kitchen appliances (i.e., Refrigerator handles, oven handles) sinks, counter-tops, floors and any/all medical equipment being utilized (i.e., walker, wheelchair, IV poles/pumps).
Clean all items that are shared between individuals (i.e., glucose meters, thermometers, b/p cuffs, stethoscopes). *It is best to use disposal wipes, paper towels, or cleaning clothes that can be washed in hot bleach water after cleaning, sponges are not recommended. The dirty cloth should not return to a clean bucket of solution and buckets/containers should be washed and disinfected after each use.

Home Restrooms:  To also help prevent spreading C. diff. spores and to prevent reinfection: Restrooms –  remove  fabric shower curtains – replace with a plain plastic/vinyl shower liner one that will be able to be cleaned with a bleach product. Remove towels hanging on hooks, or stacked near the commode.   Store toothbrushes, personal grooming items, and towels in a cabinet, linen closet, in zip-lock plastic bags, or under the vanity sink is a safer location. Remove bath mat/rug or launder daily in hot water with bleach added (color fabrics may fade due to bleach – read manufacturer labels). Cleaning with disposable towels is beneficial. CDC Recommendation is Utilizing Bleach/Water 1:10 ratio:  1 cup of Bleach + 9 cups of water made fresh daily and keeping surfaces wet with solution for ten minutes. Or there is the option to purchase EPA Registered product such as Clorox (TM) Germicidal Solution or wipes to clean hard non-porous surfaces and leaving surfaces wet for up to five minutes to kill C. diff. spores. Environmental safety is a sure way to prevent spreading the C. diff. spores and/or  reinfecting the patient

Hospital Visits:
While visiting a loved one in the hospital, wearing a gown and gloves is very important. Clostridium difficile (C diff) spores will spread throughout areas easily and by complying with hospital policies you will keep your family member, friend, yourself, and others safe. Please wash your hands after removing gloves before leaving the room you are visiting, and please wash your hands upon re-entering before new gloves and gown are worn.

ALL “TOUCHABLE (HAND CONTACT)” SURFACES SHOULD BE WIPED
with cleaning agent containing Chlorine Bleach. The CDC cleaning ratio 1:10 solution; 1 cup bleach to 9 cups of water and used on non-porous surfaces over ten minutes and mixed fresh daily for effective cleaning solution OR with a EPA Registered Sporicide/Disinfectant (i.e., Steriplex SD, Clorox Germicidal).

Question: Do Clorox® Disinfecting Wipes contain bleach? NO
Clorox® Disinfecting Wipes, purchased at local markets, are made with a bleach-free formula that’s available in Fresh Scent, Lemon Fresh, Kitchen and Lavender scents so they leave a light, clean scent every time you wipe off a surface. * The “Disinfecting” wipes by Clorox will NOT kill C Diff Spores *
The Clorox Germicidal Wipes and Solution DO have the EPA Registered C Diff Kill.
Clorox Solution has been located and sold through Lowe’s Home Improvement Centers. Check with local stores for this product.

What do I need to do when I go home from the hospital?
Once you are back at home, you can return to your normal daily routine.
Often, the diarrhea will be better or completely gone before returning to home. This makes giving
C. diff to other people much less likely. There are a few things you should do, however, to lower the
chances of developing C. diff infection again or of spreading it to others.
• If you are given a prescription to treat C. diff, take the medicine
exactly as prescribed by your doctor and pharmacist. Do not take half-doses or stop before you run out.
• Hand-washing remains #1 prevention: Take frequent 20 second hand-washing breaks during the day, especially after visiting the bathroom, before and after preparing food, after visiting stores, after visiting the gym, before and after eating, after traveling on public transportation, and often.
Cleaning with a chlorine bleach cleanser will help kill C Diff spores in the home environment.


* If any C. diff symptoms (diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramping) are noticed, please contact the primary physician, healthcare professional and/or seek medical attention at the local clinic/emergency department for assessment and C. difficile stool testing.

 

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