Tag Archives: healthcare facility environmental safety

C. diff. Solution Tablets by 3M™ – EPA Registered To Kill C.diff. Spores In 4 Minutes

On November 21, 2016  3M™  shared a press release introducing the

C.diff. Solution Tablets – EPA Registered to Kill C.diff. Spores in 4 minutes.

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When most people think of hospitals, they imagine a safe, clean environment where patients can comfortably receive treatments in an effort to get healthy. However, in reality, hospitals can pose potential risks to both patients and staff, through the threat of infections caused by pathogens such as MRSA, E. coli and C. difficile (C. diff.).

 

 

Remarkably, C. diff contributes to nearly 29,000 deaths every year – almost matching the number of deaths caused by influenza.[i] Despite the prevalence of this organism, prevention and containment pose numerous challenges as the spores can survive for weeks on a large variety of surfaces.

To combat the rise of C. diff infections at hospital facilities, 3M recently launched 3M™ C. diff Solution Tablets, providing a proven, effective alternative to bleach and peracetic acid disinfectants.

Now available for use in the U.S., the new product delivers on effectiveness, efficiency and value, by providing the following:

Effectiveness

  • EPA-registered to kill diff spores in four minutes
  • Effective against Norovirus
  • Safer than bleach and peracetic acid, featuring an NFPA rating of 0,0,0 with no personal protective equipment required at use dilution
  • In-use pH of 5.5 to 6.5, which is closer to neutral than bleach or peracetic acid

Efficiency

  • Dissolves in approximately three minutes with a mild chlorine smell
  • Tablets are available in two sizes for use in large and small containers
  • The product can be applied with a cloth, wipe, mop, or coarse trigger sprayer, and will not bind to common wiping media

Value

  • Costs significantly less than ready-to-use bleach
  • Yields a three-year shelf life in sealed packets, and seven-day shelf life when diluted and stored in a closed container

 

“We are excited to provide our customers with an effective solution for the battle against C. diff,” said Adrian Cook, product marketer for chemicals at 3M Commercial Solutions Division. “The reduction and prevention of infections is an important focus for our customers and we look forward to continuing our work in ensuring safe environments.”

In addition to the new product launch, 3M Commercial Solutions Division also announced the expansion of its Flow Control System product line through the introduction of four additional chemical offerings:

 

  • 3M™ Quat Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate 5A
    EPA-registered disinfectant cleaner for use in hospitals. Kills HIV-1, MRSA, VRE, herpes simplex I and II and other pathogens. Rinse-free, pleasant fragrance. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 107 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

 

  • 3M™ Neutral Quat Disinfectant Cleaner Concentrate 23A
    EPA-registered disinfectant cleaner kills HIV-1, MRSA, VRE, herpes simplex I and II, and other pathogens. Rinse-free, low foaming, neutral pH formula. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 100 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

 

  • Scotchgard™ Pretreatment Cleaner Concentrate 28A
    Hard-working cleaner for heavily soiled areas of colorfast carpet. Use as a pre-spray prior to extraction or shampooing to loosen soils and stains. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 26 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

 

  • 3M™ Bathroom Cleaner Concentrate 44A
    Green Seal™ Certified bathroom cleaner. Removes soap scum and scale from bathroom surfaces. 0.5 gallon concentrate bottle yields 28 ready-to-use gallons. 4/case.

For more information about 3M™ C. diff Solution Tablets and the 3M Flow Control System, please visit www.3M.com/facility

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3M Company.

All other trademarks listed herein are owned by their respective companies.

Source:  3M Company

 

*PLEASE NOTE – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only. Thank  you.

Taking Aim at Superbugs and A Review Of the Latest CDC Vital Signs Report With Guest Clifford McDonald, MD Of the CDC

Listen In On Tuesday, March 22nd

cdiffRadioLogoMarch2015
To access the live broadcast and program archives,
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
please click on the logo above *

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

“Taking aim at “super-bugs” and the latest CDC Vital Signs Report results”

With Our Guest, Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, — Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC

Tuesday, March 22nd at the following times

10 a.m. Pacific Time
11 a.m. Mountain Time 
12 p.m. Central Time  
1 p.m. Eastern Time

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sounds the alarm on the danger of modern medicine returning to a time when simple infections were often fatal. As the latest Vital Signs Report shows, much progress has been made in our hospitals and healthcare facilities to protect patients from healthcare-associated infections. But, more work needs to be done, because many of these infections are caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria which are difficult, if not impossible to treat. The CDC believes clinicians are key to national progress in preventing infections. They have the power to change the direction of antibiotic resistance each and every time they care for their patients. It requires taking the appropriate steps every time.

We are in a race to slow resistance, and we can’t afford to let the “superbugs” outpace us, especially in healthcare settings.

Cliff-McDonald

Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University, and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University. Past positions have included Associate Investigator at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan and Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville. Dr. McDonald is a former officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service and former Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC where he currently serves as Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity in the same division. He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology/prevention of HAI’s, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and prevention of antimicrobial resistance.

C. diff. Spores and More™  Global Broadcasting Network –  producing educational programs dedicated to  C. difficile Infections and more —  brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

C. difficile Infection Study By Yale-led Team Estimate Transmission Rates In Three Healthcare Settings

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In The News

A Yale-led study estimates transmission rates inside and outside of hospitals, providing insight into different sources of the infection and how it might be better controlled.

Previous studies found that less than half of C. diff infections in hospitalized patients could be attributed to spread from other infected patients. “It’s traditionally been thought of as a hospital-focused disease, but there is increasing recognition of transmission outside the hospital,” said first author David P. Durham, associate research scientist in epidemiology.

To determine how the remaining infections spread, the Yale-led team developed a dynamic model to estimate transmission rates in three settings: hospitals, long-term care facilities, and the general community.

They found that hospitalized patients with symptoms of C. diff infection transmitted it at a rate 15 times higher than asymptomatic patients, even after accounting for infection control measures.

The rates of transmission among residents in long-term care facilities and in the community were 27% and 0.1% that of hospitalized patients, respectively.

“The latter rates are lower but still important sources of transmission, due to the much larger population outside of the hospital setting,” said co-author Jeffrey Townsend, associate professor of public health.

The findings point to the need to account for asymptomatic carriers and community sources in efforts to prevent and control C. diff infection, the researchers noted.

The study was published on March 16 in Emerging Infectious Diseases. Other authors include Yale professor Alison Galvani and Washington University researchers Erik Dubberke and Margaret Olsen.

 

Source:

http://news.yale.edu/2016/03/16/research-news-yale-study-estimates-transmission-deadly-c-diff-infection

C. diff. Infection (CDI) Prevention Is A Multidisciplinary Effort In All Settings

HandsaroundworldPreventing a C. diff. infection (CDI) is a multidisciplinary effort in every setting.

It requires everyone, from physicians to nurses, pharmacy to the microbiology laboratory, housekeeping to hospital leadership, family members, patients, visitors, and especially infection prevention and control staff, to do their part.

Let us not dismiss the importance of hand hygiene (hand-washing) or environmental disinfection in all settings…..from  healthcare facilities to outpatient clinics to physician offices to the home.

Soap and water should always be used preferentially over alcohol-based hand rubs if the hands become grossly contaminated or if gloves were not worn.

https://cdifffoundation.org/category/infection-control/

Enhanced cleaning of the environment with sporicidal methods is clearly indicated if your facility has issues with CDI cases occurring repeatedly in the same room. Before changing the approach to cleaning the environment, it is important to make sure that the environment is being cleaned in the first place—the sporicidal agent will not have the opportunity to work if it is never applied. 

https://cdifffoundation.org/category/epa-registered-c-diff-kill-cleaning-products-environmental-safety/

For Home Care Information:  https://cdifffoundation.org/category/home-care/

Existing data indicate that the most effective methods to prevent CDI in hospitals are:

Improving antimicrobial (antibiotic) prescribing; Promptly identifying patients with CDI and place them on contact precautions, and Making sure that healthcare workers are compliant with contact precautions, including gowns, gloves, use of dedicated equipment whenever possible, and ensuring that non-dedicated equipment is adequately cleaned between patients.

https://cdifffoundation.org/category/antibiotic-news/

 

 

 

Sources:Medscape, CDC