Tag Archives: Fecal Microbiota Transplant

Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) A Promising Treatment And Recurrent C diff Infections

NurseCadeceus

The media and publications are raising
FMT awareness .

The positive effects are being
noted as FMT’s hold a promising treatment option and success is being witnessed in patients suffering
through C. diff. infections.

Being treated  by a physician with a Fecal Microbiota Transplantation, to treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, is resolving the pain and torment being experienced by patients.

What is a Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT)?

Fecal microbiota transplants (FMTs) are exactly what they sound like.
They involve taking feces from a healthy person and putting them into the body
of a sick patient to strengthen the community of bacteria that live in the patient’s gut.
FMTs are very effective at curing stubborn infections with Clostridium difficile (C. diff).

The deadly bacteria cause 500,000 illnesses and 14,000 deaths each year in the United States. Small studies have shown that FMTs can cure about 90 percent of serious C. diff infections. They have been so successful that scientists are testing the transplants for other conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome. (1)

However; this treatment – in any form – has not yet been approved by the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Clinical data is pending and FMT remains investigational at this time.

Below is the link to the FDA website and the March 2014 document regarding
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) for the general public:

III.  When FDA Intends to Exercise Enforcement Discretion 

FDA does not intend to exercise enforcement discretion for the use of an FMT product when the FMT product is manufactured from the stool of a donor who is not known by either the patient or the licensed health care provider treating the patient, or when the donor and donor stool are not qualified under the direction of the treating licensed health care provider.
FDA will continue to evaluate its enforcement policy.
Furthermore, during the period of enforcement discretion, FDA will continue to work with sponsors who intend to submit INDs for use of FMT to treat C. difficile infection not responding to standard therapies.
This enforcement discretion policy does not extend to other uses of FMT.  Data related to the use and study of FMT to treat diseases or conditions other than C. difficile infection are  more limited, and study of FMT for these other uses is not included in this enforcement policy.  (2)
* Also, click on the link below to view the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Upcoming Workshop Information:
**  Always discuss treatment options available with a Healthcare provider
and review/discuss clinical studies in progress.
Resources:

UBiome and OpenBiome Partner in Microbiome Studies

The study will provide new insights on mechanics of fecal microbiota transplantation with patients being treated for a C. diff. infection.

uBiome and OpenBiome Partner for Microbiome Study in FMT Patients

Study will provide new insights on mechanics of fecal microbiota transplantation in patients treated for a C. difficile infection.

uBiome and OpenBiome announced a new partnership to study the microbiome of patients undergoing fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) as a treatment for Clostridium difficile infections (C. diff).

Any patient undergoing clinical FMT treatment can request their complimentary mail-order microbiome testing kit at http://ubiome.com/pages/fmt. The kit allows them to swab a sample of their microbiome, which they send back to uBiome for analysis and sequencing. uBiome will use the collected data to conduct a study of FMT’s impact on the body’s microbiota. All study participants will also receive a detailed report on their personal microbiome.

“Because we will be looking at patients before, during, and after FMT we will be able to learn about how the microbiota adjusts to the treatment,” adds OpenBiome Co-Founder and President Dr. Mark Smith. “This has the potential to not only shed light on C. diff, but also open the door to using FMT with patients suffering other conditions.”

C. diff infections can occur when there is a severe imbalance of gut microbiota. Because of this imbalance, the bacterium thrives and causes extreme gastrointestinal distress.

This study will serve to increase awareness and understanding of how FMT affects the human microbiome, which could increase its acceptance in the medical community as a way to treat a potential variety of gastrointestinal conditions.

About uBiome:
uBiome (ubiome.com) sequences the microbiome for citizen scientists, researchers, and clinicians, using microbial genomics to help patients benefit from new discoveries in scientific research. uBiome conducts research studies on the microbiome and develops clinical diagnostics based on microbiome research.

About OpenBiome:
OpenBiome (openbiome.org) is a nonprofit stool bank dedicated to expanding safe access to fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) therapies. Founded by a team of microbiologists, public health advocates, and concerned citizens, OpenBiome aims to significantly reduce the practical barriers for clinicians providing FMTs, while connecting scientists across studies and disciplines.

To read the article in its entirety please click on the following link:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/07/prweb12820941.htm

June 2015