Tag Archives: Hospital-acquired infection prevention

Infection Prevention – Patient Safety – Prior And During A Hospital Stay

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This is a patient – safety article and quite informative and beneficial for everyone.  The topics are highlighted on how to prevent infections prior and during a hospital stay.

 

The most pertinent information to review and share with others is as follows:

1. Check Up on Your Hospital
See how it compares with others on central line, C. diff, and MRSA infections, as well as other measures of patient safety. To compare hospitals in your area at preventing infections, use our hospital ratings.

2. Have a Friend or Family Member With You
That person can act as your advocate, ask questions, and keep notes. A Consumer Reports survey of 1,200 recently hospitalized people found that those who had a companion were 16 percent more likely to say that they had been treated respectfully by medical personnel. The most important times to have a companion for preventing infections and other medical errors are on nights, weekends, and holidays, when staff is reduced, and when shifts change.

3. Keep a Record
Keep a pad and pen nearby so that you can note what doctors and nurses say, which drugs you get, and questions you have. If you spot something worrisome, such as a drug you don’t recognize, take a note or snap a picture on your phone. You can also use your phone to record thoughts or conversations with staff. Though some may object, “explain that you are recording so you remember later,” McGiffert says.

4. Insist on Clean Hands
Ask everyone who enters your room whether they’ve washed their hands with soap and water. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer is not enough to destroy certain bacteria, such as the dangerous C. diff. Don’t hesitate to say: “I’m sorry, but I didn’t see you wash your hands. Would you mind doing it again?”

https://cdifffoundation.org/hand-washing-updates/

 

5. Keep It Clean
Bring bleach wipes for bed rails, doorknobs, the phone, and the TV remote, all of which can harbor bacteria. And if your room looks dirty, ask that it be cleaned.

6. Cover Wounds
Some hospitals examine incisions daily for infection, but opening the bandage exposes the area to bacteria. Newer techniques—sealing the surgical site with skin glue (instead of staples, which can harbor bacteria) and waterproof dressings that stay on for one to three weeks without opening—are effective at preventing infection.

7. Inquire Whether IVs and Catheters Are Needed
Ask every day whether central lines, urinary catheters, or other tubes can be removed. The longer they’re left in place, the greater the infection risk.

8. Ask About Antibiotics
For many surgeries, you should get an antibiotic 60 minutes before the operation. But research suggests that the type of antibiotic used or the timing of when it’s administered is wrong in up to half of cases.

Listen to one of the educational Podcasts:  Using antibiotics wisely, How to help in the fight against antibiotic resistance  with Guests Dr. Arjun Srinivassan, MD and Dr. Lauri Hicks, DO

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/93656/encore-using-antibiotics-wisely-how-you-can-help-in-the-fight-against-antibiotic-resistance

9. Postpone Surgery If You Have an Infection
That increases your risk of developing a new infection and worsening an existing one. So if you have any other type of infection—say, an abscessed tooth—then the surgery should be postponed, if possible, until it’s completely resolved.

10. Say No to Razors
Removing hair from the surgical site is often necessary, but doing that with a regular razor can cause nicks that provide an opening for bacteria. The nurse should use an electric trimmer instead.

11. Question the Need for Heartburn Drugs
Some patients enter the hospital taking heartburn drugs such as Nexium, lansoprazole (Prevacid) or omeprazole (Prilosec) or are prescribed one after they’re admitted. But these drugs, called proton-pump inhibitors, increase the risk of intestinal infections and pneumonia, so consider stopping them before admission and, once there, ask whether you really need one.

12. Test for MRSA
Ask your surgeon to screen you for MRSA, a potentially deadly bacteria that’s resistant to antibiotics, either before you enter or on admission, so that you can address the problem and hospital staff can take extra steps to protect you and others.

13. Watch for Diarrhea
Get tested for C. diff. infection  if you have three loose stools within 24 hours. If you test positive, expect extra precautions for preventing infections from spreading to others.

14. Quit Smoking, Even Temporarily
You won’t be allowed to smoke in the hospital anyway, and stopping as long as possible beforehand cuts the risk of infection. Read our advice on how to stop smoking.

15. Wash Up the Night Before Surgery
Ask about taking precautions before entering the hospital, such as bathing with special soap or using antiseptic wipes.

To read the article in its entirety click on the following link to be redirected:

Taking Aim at Superbugs and A Review Of the Latest CDC Vital Signs Report With Guest Clifford McDonald, MD Of the CDC

Listen In On Tuesday, March 22nd

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To access the live broadcast and program archives,
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
please click on the logo above *

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

“Taking aim at “super-bugs” and the latest CDC Vital Signs Report results”

With Our Guest, Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, — Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC

Tuesday, March 22nd at the following times

10 a.m. Pacific Time
11 a.m. Mountain Time 
12 p.m. Central Time  
1 p.m. Eastern Time

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sounds the alarm on the danger of modern medicine returning to a time when simple infections were often fatal. As the latest Vital Signs Report shows, much progress has been made in our hospitals and healthcare facilities to protect patients from healthcare-associated infections. But, more work needs to be done, because many of these infections are caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria which are difficult, if not impossible to treat. The CDC believes clinicians are key to national progress in preventing infections. They have the power to change the direction of antibiotic resistance each and every time they care for their patients. It requires taking the appropriate steps every time.

We are in a race to slow resistance, and we can’t afford to let the “superbugs” outpace us, especially in healthcare settings.

Cliff-McDonald

Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University, and an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University. Past positions have included Associate Investigator at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan and Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville. Dr. McDonald is a former officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service and former Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the CDC where he currently serves as Senior Advisor for Science and Integrity in the same division. He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology/prevention of HAI’s, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and prevention of antimicrobial resistance.

C. diff. Spores and More™  Global Broadcasting Network –  producing educational programs dedicated to  C. difficile Infections and more —  brought to you by VoiceAmerica and sponsored by Clorox Healthcare

C Diff Foundation launches C. diff. Radio, “C. diff. Spores and More” on March 3rd, 2015

What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?  Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

We invite you to join us in listening to this exciing, new internet talk show when it debuts Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015 at the following times:

ET   2 – 3 p.m.,  CT 1 – 2 p.m.,  MT 12 – 1 p.m.,  PT 11 – 12 p.m.

We are so excited to share the debut of “C. diff. Spores and More” with you – not only because the C Diff Foundation, our Founding Executive Director –  Nancy C. Caralla, and Chairperson of Research and Development – Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, are introducing the first episode, but also because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. In March, 2012 the  CDC  said in a report that the C difficile infection kills 14,000 people a year. But that estimate is based on death certificates, which often don’t list the infection when patients die from complications, such as kidney failure.  Hospital billing data collected by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality shows that more than 9% of C. diff-related hospitalizations end in death — nearly five times the rate for other hospital stays. That adds up to more than 30,000 fatalities among the 347,000 C. diff hospitalizations in 2010. Thousands more patients are treated in nursing homes, clinics and doctors’ offices.

“We’re talking in the range of close to 500,000 total cases a year,” says Cliff McDonald, a C. diff expert and senior science adviser in the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. And annual fatalities “may well be … as high as * 30,000.”

* AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed                   C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” will spotlight world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more. Through their interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Please join us in listening to the first of many episodes of C. diff. Spores and More” debuting on Tuesday, March 3rd .

View the programs and radio information:

health.voiceamerica.com

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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C Diff Foundation Promoting C. difficile Prevention and Awareness to Witness a Decrease in C. difficile Infections Worldwide

November is C. difficile Infection Awareness Month!   Join us in the fight by participating in a variety of events that let you support the cause while doing the things you love to do. Here’s a listing of many ways the C Diff Foundation is spreading awareness with ways to prevent acquiring this infection while raising funds.

Take the Antibiotic “Resistance Fighter” Pledge

How to be a resistance fighter?   Limit the use of Antibiotics! Understand that antibiotics are only effective against bacteria and not viruses: colds, flu and most coughs are caused by viruses and will get better on their own.  Treat your flu and cold symptoms and let your immune system fight the virus.  Antibiotics will not help you get better quickly, and may give you side effects such as diarrhea and thrush. They can also lead to acquired C. diff. infections. They won’t stop your virus spreading to other people only YOU can do that with good hand hygiene.  Don’t ask for antibiotics , instead ask your doctor about the best way to treat your symptoms.   If you are prescribed antibiotics ask your doctor about the risks and benefits and always take them exactly as prescribed. Never take someone else’s antibiotics, always speak with your Primary Care Physician (PCP) or healthcare professional when symptoms linger or worsen.

Let us all take the “Resistance Fighter” Pledge and feel free to share the pledge with             everyone you know:
I will not expect antibiotics for colds and flu as they have no effect on viruses.
I will take antibiotics as directed IF I am prescribed them, and not ask for them.
I will practice good hygiene, making hand washing #1, and help stop giving germs a free ride.

Now we can ALL spread knowledge, not infections and encourage others to join the fight against antibiotic resistance.

“Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work” CDC Campaign :

Get Smart About Antibiotics Week has been an annual effort to coordinate the work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. The campaign organized its first annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week in 2008. CDC’s Get Smart campaign, housed in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, collaborated with state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns and non-profit and for-profit partners. The success of the pilot year was measured by 1) dissemination of educational materials and messages, 2) partner satisfaction, and 3) media interest. A robust evaluation of the pilot week determined that each of these goals was met and exceeded. This was followed by other successful Get Smart About Antibiotics Week observances.

During November 17-23, 2014, the annual Get Smart About Antibiotics Week will be observed. As in past years, the effort will coordinate work of CDC’s Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign, state-based appropriate antibiotic use campaigns, non-profit partners, and for-profit partners during a one week observance of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. As with the past observances, messages and resources for improving antibiotic use in  healthcare settings from CDC’s Get Smart for Healthcare campaign will be included. Get Smart for Healthcare is a program housed in CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.

  • Ask your physician questions such as, “Do I really need an antibiotic?”
  • Bacteria only, not viruses (common cold, flu), can be killed by antibiotics.
  • Complete the entire course of prescribed antibiotics, even if you feel better midway through.

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacterial changes reduce or eliminate an antibiotic’s ability to kill the bacteria.

The Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC)  recommends the following:

  • Take antibiotics only and exactly as instructed by your healthcare provider.
  • Only take antibiotics prescribed for you.
  • Do not save or share antibiotics prescribed to you.
  • Do not pressure your healthcare provider to prescribe you antibiotics.

 

SHOPPING:

Shop Amazon to Give to the C Diff Foundation

It’s a pleasure to share the new way to give to the C Diff Foundation.  Amazon will share a portion of the proceeds from your purchases with the  C Diff Foundation.  While you are shopping on-line you are also donating, and we are grateful.  Here is how it works:

* Shop Amazon through AmazonSmile and select C Diff Foundation as your charity.

Click on the link below to access their site.

https://smile.amazon.com/

Sign into your Amazon Account with ID and Password.  Scroll down past the default chosen Charity and at the following option

Or pick your own charitable organization:________  

Type in  C Diff Foundation and press Enter

C Diff Foundation Inc (About)
Specifically Named Diseases             New Prt Rchy, FL
Click the SELECT button

It is as easy as that!

Education:

2nd Annual “Raising C. difficile infection and Hospital-Associated Infections (HAI’s) Awareness” Conference on November 4th, 2014 at 8:00 am. The event will be hosted at the                               University of Illinois at Chicago  Student Center West,
828 S. Wolcott Avenue,  M. M. Thompson Room – C, Chicago, IL 60612

Twitter chats and daily tweets in honor of Raising C. difficile infection Awareness Week                   From  November 1st through November 7th.

worldaroundCDF Volunteers continue sharing information  within their communities, and organizing Fundraisers during the month of November to raise C. difficile infection awareness, prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.  Each Volunteer is a special leaf, on each branch of this growing  Foundation tree.  Our sincere gratitude to every one of our Volunteers!!

Follow the C Diff Foundation   on Facebook,                                                                                          Twitter @CDiffFoundation, Pinetrest, and LinkedIn and join the fight.

Thank you for your support that helps our mission continue moving forward.                         Educating and advocating for C. difficile infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.

Be sure to check our C Diff Foundation page often as new events are added weekly.