Tag Archives: Nursing

C Diff Foundation Welcomes Barley Chironda, RPN, CIC

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We are pleased to welcome Barley Chironda, RPN, CIC  to the C Diff Foundation in the role of Infection Prevention Advocate.

Barley Chironda, RPN, CIC is a Nurse and is the Social Media Manager of IPAC Canada and the current President of IPAC- GTA.

He is also the National Healthcare Sales Director and Infection Control Specialist with Clorox Canada. Mr. Chironda is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC™) and has worked extensively in Infection Control.  He is typically found engaged in motivating hospital staff, patients and the public on proper infection prevention practices.

Mr. Chironda’s roles allow great participation in quality improvement interventions related to patient and public safety. Therefore Barley has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral change.

Barley takes great pride in sharing information via social media and is often engaging the public on Twitter™ and LinkedIn™, partaking in resource distribution related to innovative and novel Infection prevention strategies.

 

C.diff Spores and More Discuss Current C.difficile Infection Objectives For Hospitals Within the United Kingdom With James McIlroy, Founder of EuroBiotix CIC

 

Listen To The JUNE 7, 2016 Podcast

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To access the live broadcast and Podcast Library
C. diff. Spores and More  Global Broadcasting Network
please click on the logo above *

C. diff. Spores and More,” Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This Episode:      “EuroBiotix CIC – Supporting Clinicians Within the UK Deliver Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) To Patients With Recurrent C.difficile Infection”

With Our Guest:              James Mcllory

Listen to the PodCast available from the JUNE 7TH  C.diff Spores and More episode as we discussed current C.difficile infection objectives for hospitals within the United Kingdom with James McIlroy, a medical student and founder of a not-for-profit stool bank based within the University of Aberdeen in Scotland

MORE ABOUT OUR GUEST:

James McIlroy is a senior medical student at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. Previously, he earned his Bachelors in Medical Sciences with Honors in human Physiology at the University of Edinburgh. At the present time, James is undertaking a prestigious fellowship at the Royal Society of Edinburgh. During his time at medical school, James identified an unmet need for safe access to fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) within the United Kingdom. He subsequently established a not-for-profit community interest company called EuroBiotix CIC, which seeks to support clinicians within the UK National Health Service provide FMT.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and C Diff Foundation volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community worldwide.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

Programming for C. diff. Spores and More ™  is made possible through our official  Sponsor;  Clorox Healthcare

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Clostridium difficile (C.diff.) Infection (CDI) Rates In the United States and Across the Globe Have Increased In the Last Decade, Along With Associated Morbidity and Mortality

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Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Clostridium difficile: Update

Prepared for:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
March 2016

 

Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium generally associated through ingestion. Various strains of the bacteria may produce disease generating toxins
and TedA and TedB, as well as the lesser understood binary toxin.

Our use of the term indicates this review’s focus is the presence of clinical disease rather than asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile CDI symptoms can range from mild diarrhea to severe cases including pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon and death.

Estimated U.S. health care associated CDI incidence in 2011 was 95.3 per 100,000, or about
293,000 cases nationally. Incidence is higher among females, whites, and persons 65 years of
age or older. (1)

About one third to one half of health-care onset CDI cases begin in long term care,thus residents in these facilities are at high risk.  Incidence rates may increase by four or five-fold during outbreaks.

Community associated CDI, where CDI occurs outside the institutional setting,
is also on the rise, though still generally lower than institution associated rates and may be in part due to increased surveillance. Estimated community associated CDI was 51.9 per 100,000, or   159,700 cases in 2011.  (1)

Community-associated CDI complicates measuring the effectiveness of  prevention within an institutional setting. 3  Additionally, the pathogenesis of CDI is complex and not
completely understood, and onset may occur as late as several months after hospitalization or antibiotic use

The estimated mortality rate for health -care associated CDI ranged from 2.4 to 8.9 deaths per

100,000 population in 2011.(1) For individuals ≥65 years of age, the mortality rate
was 55.1 deaths per 100,000; (1)

CDI was the 17th leading cause of death in this age group (4)
Hypervirulent C. difficile  strains have emerged since 2000 . These affect a wider population

that includes children, pregnant women, and other healthy
adults, many of whom lack standard risk profiles such as previous hospitalization or antibiotic use.(5)

The hypervirulent strains  account for 51 percent of CDI, compared to only 17 percent
of historical isolates. (6)

Time from symptom development to septic shock may be reduced in the hypervirulent strains, making quick diagnosis and proactive treatment regimens critical for positive outcomes.

To read more on  TREATMENT, PREVENTION, KEY QUESTIONS ——

https://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ehc/products/604/2208/c-difficile-update-report-160329.pdf

Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Clostridium difficile: Update

Prepared for:
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
March 2016

 

Sources:

1Appendix J. References for Appendixes
1.Alcala L, Reigadas E, Marin M, et al.
Comparison of GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert
C. difficile as confirmatory tests in a multistep
algorithm for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile
infection.
J Clin Microbiol 2015 Jan;53(1):332
5. PMID: 25392360.
2.Barkin JA, Nandi N, Miller N, et al.
Super iority
of the DNA amplification assay for the
diagnosis of C. difficile infection: a clinical
comparison of fecal tests.
Dig Dis Sci 2012Oct;57(10):2592-
9. PMID: 22576711.
3.Bruins MJ, Verbeek E, Wallinga JA, et al.
Evaluation of three enzyme immunoassay
s and a loo mediated isothermal amplification test
for the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium
difficile infection. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect
Dis 2012 Nov;31(11):3035 9. PMID:
22706512.
4.Buchan BW, Mackey TL, Daly JA, et al.
Multicenter clinical evalu
ation of the portrait
toxigenic C. difficile assay for detection of
toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains in clinical
stool specimens. J Clin Microbiol 2012
Dec;50(12):3932-
6. PMID: 23015667.
5.Calderaro A, Buttrini M, Martinelli M, et al.
Comparative analysis of different methods to
detect Clostridium difficile infection. New
Microbiol 2013 Jan;36(1):57-
63. PMID:
23435816.
6.Carroll KC, Buchan BW, Tan S, et al.
Multicenter evaluation of the Verigene
Clostridium difficile nucleic acid assay.
J ClinMicrobiol 2013 Dec;51(12):4120-
5. PMID:24088862

IDSA and SHEA Release New Antibiotic Stewardship Guidelines

In The News

April 2016

Preauthorization of broad-spectrum antibiotics and prospective review after two or three days of treatment should form the cornerstone of antibiotic stewardship programs to ensure the right drug is prescribed at the right time for the right diagnosis. These are among the numerous recommendations included in new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

“Initially, antibiotic stewardship was more focused on cost savings, and physicians responded negatively to that, because they often felt it was best to give patients the newest, most expensive drug,” said Tamar Barlam, MD, lead co-author of the guidelines, director of the antibiotic stewardship program at Boston Medical Center and associate professor of medicine at Boston University Medical School. “While these programs do save hospitals money, their most important benefit is that they improve patient outcomes and reduce the emergence of antibiotic resistance. When we say stewardship, we really mean stewardship, and increasingly, doctors are realizing it’s important and necessary.”

The White House has called for hospitals and healthcare systems to implement antibiotic stewardship programs by 2020 to ensure appropriate use of these vital drugs and reduce resistance, an escalating problem that threatens the ability to effectively treat often life-threatening infections.

The new guidelines replace those originally created to help with the development of programs when antibiotic stewardship was in its infancy, and instead focus on specific strategies that the evidence suggests are most beneficial to ensure the program will be effective and sustainable. They also note it is key that these programs tailor interventions based on local issues, resources and expertise. To ensure that, the guidelines recommend the programs be led by physicians and pharmacists and rely on the expertise of infectious diseases specialists.

“We want hospital administrators to understand the importance of giving antibiotic stewardship their full support to ensure its success,” said Sara Cosgrove, MD, MS, lead co-author of the guidelines, president-elect of SHEA and associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University, and director of the antimicrobial stewardship program and associate hospital epidemiologist at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. “Distributing a few brochures or holding grand rounds won’t do it. It’s vital that antibiotic stewardship be integrated into the hospital’s culture and that infectious disease specialists guide strategies that have been shown to work.”

The guidelines note that more research needs to be done to determine how to ensure antibiotic stewardship is most effective. However, the best evidence to date suggests a number of components, including the following, will help ensure the implementation of an effective antibiotic stewardship program.

  • Preauthorization or prospective audit and feedback – Targeted antibiotics, such as those that treat emerging drug-resistant bacterial infections, should require preauthorization. This means providers need to get approval to use antibiotics before they are prescribed. Prospective audit and feedback can be an alternate strategy or combined with preauthorization. Prospective audit allows antibiotic stewards to engage the prescribing clinician after the antibiotic has been used, typically after two or three days, to optimize antibiotic treatments. Both methods can reduce antibiotic misuse and decrease the development of resistance. Hospitals should choose one or both of these methods as part of their program based on their local resources and expertise.
  • Syndrome-specific interventions – The guidelines recommend focused multifaceted interventions for the treatment of specific syndromes, rather than trying to improve treatment of all infections at once. For example, Dr. Barlam said those leading a hospital’s antibiotic stewardship program might take a close look at management of pneumonia during winter, including making recommendations to shorten the amount of time people are treated and switching to an oral agent more quickly, and then measuring the results of those interventions. In the fall, the program might focus on urinary tract infections and then several months later, switch to skin and soft tissue infections. “This method makes stewardship more manageable and provides a targeted and clear treatment message rather than trying to disseminate 100 different lessons at the same time,” she said.
  • Rapid diagnostic testing – The guidelines note that rapid diagnostic testing of respiratory specimens can help determine if the cause is viral and therefore reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics. They also note that the rapid testing of blood cultures in addition to conventional culture is helpful, but should be guided by the antibiotic stewardship team for maximum benefit to the patient.

Other recommendations include reducing the use of antibiotics associated with Clostridium difficile infection, implementing antibiotic time-outs and other strategies to encourage prescribers to perform routine reviews of regimens and using computerized clinical decision support if possible.

The guidelines do not recommend relying solely on passive educational materials to implement antibiotic stewardship because any improvement likely will not be sustained. Lectures and brochures should be used to supplement strategies such as antibiotic preauthorization and prospective audit and feedback, the authors note.

AT A GLANCE

  • Preauthorization and prospective review of antibiotics are among the many recommendations to ensure antibiotic stewardship programs are most effective, suggest new guidelines from IDSA/SHEA.
  • Antibiotic stewardship programs should be led by physicians and pharmacists, including ID specialists, who have the expertise and education to ensure the right drug is being prescribed at the right time for the right diagnosis.
  • Antibiotic stewardship programs must be based on the specific problems identified by the healthcare facility and a realistic examination of available resources to ensure interventions are performed with consistency.
  • These programs have been shown to improve patient outcomes, reduce antibiotic resistance and save money.

In addition to Drs. Barlam and Cosgrove, the antibiotic stewardship program guidelines panel includes: Lilian Abbo, Conan MacDougall, Audrey N. Schuetz, Ed Septimus, Arjun Srinivasan, Timothy Dellit, Yngve T. Falck-Ytter, Neil Fishman, Cindy W. Hamilton, Timothy C. Jenkins, Pamela A. Lipsett, Preeti N. Malani, Larissa S. May, Gregory J. Moran, Melinda M. Neuhauser, Jason Newland, Christopher A. Ohl, Matthew Samore, Susan Seo and Kavita K. Trivedi.

IDSA and SHEA individually have published myriad treatment guidelines and together have published several, including the prevention of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery.

As with other IDSA and SHEA guidelines, the antibiotic stewardship guidelines will be available in a smartphone format and a pocket-sized quick-reference edition.

The full guidelines are available free on the

IDSA website at http://www.idsociety.org

 

SHEA website at http://www.shea-online.org.

 

To read this article in its entirety click  on the following link:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-04/idso-nas041216.php

 

The C Diff Foundation Offers Patients, Family Members, and Clinicians Global Community Support

We are pleased to announce the

C. diff. Global Community Support Program —   an extension of  our

existing patient program – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program.

Our Foundation Members and Medical Advocates, leading the support groups, via: teleconferencing, will now have the ability to offer support to patients, families, clinicians, and individuals seeking support —  in  the U.S. and 57 countries.

Below you will find the list of countries, with their local cities,  able
to participate in our teleconferencing support groups:

Argentina – Buenos Aires and Cordoba
Australia – Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney
Austria – Countrywide, Vienna
Bahrain – Countrywide
Belgium – Brussels
Brazil – Belo Horizonte, Curitiba, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo
Bulgaria – Sofia
Canada – Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, Toronto,
Vancouver, Winnipeg.
Chile – Santiago
China – Beijing
Columbia – Bogota
Costa Rica – National VolP
Croatia – Zagreb
Cyprus – Nicosia
Czech Republic – Prague
Denmark – Countrywide
Dominican Republic – Santo Domingo
El Salvador – San Salvador
Finland – Helsinki
France – Marseille, Paris
Germany – Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich
Greece – Athens
Hong Kong – Countrywide
Hungary – Budapest
India – Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai
Ireland – Dublin, National VolP
Israel – Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
Italy – Milan, Rome
Japan – Tokyo
Latvia- Riga
Lithuania – Vilnius
Luxembourg – Countrywide
Malaysia – Kuala Lumpur
Malta – Countrywide
Mexico – Guadalajara, Mexico City, Monterrey
Netherlands – Amsterdam
New Zealand – Auckland
Norway – Oslo
Panama – Panama City
Peru – Lima
Poland – Warsaw
Portugal – Countrywide
Puerto Rico – Aguadilla
Romania – Bucharest
Russia – Moscow
Singapore – Singapore
Slovakia – Bratislava
Slovenia – Ljubljana
South Africa – Cape Town, Johannesburg
South Korea – Seoul
Spain – Barcelona, Madrid
Sweden – Malmo, Stockholm
Switzerland – Bern, Geneva, Zurich
Turkey – Istanbul
Ukraine – National VolP
United Kingdom – Birmingham, Edinburgh, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, National.
Venezuela – Caracas

Registration will remain the same – through the main number (919) 201-1512
or utilizing the nationwide U.S. Hot-Line 1-844-FOR-CDIF, or from the Foundation website
http://www.cdifffoundation.org C. diff. Global Community Support page.

Support is only a phone call away worldwide

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C diff Spores and More Global Broadcasting Network and Guests Dr. Srinivasan and Dr. Hicks of the CDC Discuss Antibiotic Resistance

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C. diff. Spores and More , Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio show discuss antibiotic resistance and what everyone can do to join in the fight against it with guests Dr. Arjun Srinivasan and
Dr. Lauri Hicks on Tuesday, February 9th at 10 AM Pacific Time on VoiceAmerica Health and Wellness Channel

Bringing guests together, such as Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD and Dr. Lauri Hicks, DO from the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one of the leading government healthcare organizations in the U.S., and internationally recognized experts on antibiotic resistance has built a loyal listenership and continue to inform and educate listeners’ worldwide.

C.diff. Spores and More” is broadcast live every Tuesday at 10 AM Pacific Time on the VoiceAmerica Health and Wellness channel, officially sponsored by Clorox Healthcare. Archived C. diff. Spores and More shows can be found Here.

“I am so proud to be the Senior Executive Producer of the “C. diff. Spores and More,” program as it continues to raise awareness, on a global level, of the overuse of antibiotics. Having guests; Dr. Arjun Srinivasan, MD and Dr. Lauri Hicks, DO truly affect change in both the leadership and education guiding the public and raising awareness in many areas of health care,” stated Robert Ciolino, Senior Executive Producer VoiceAmerica.

About The C diff Foundation Executive Director
Nancy C Caralla, hosts “C. diff. Spores and More” Global Broadcasting Network with a team focus on educating, and advocating for C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, and environmental safety – and more — worldwide.

For information please visit www.cdifffoundation.org

Listen in on Tuesday, February 9th at 10:00 Pacific Time–

https://cdifffoundation.org/c-diff-radio/

Link

Hospitals seek high-tech help for hand hygiene.

The Biovigil badge system is one of great innovation.  The new emerging technology is proving positive results in improving infection control in healthcare.  Here is an excerpt from the following article regarding the badge operation:

Nurses using the Biovigil system at St. Mary’s near St. Louis wear a badge with changeable colored lights. A doorway sensor identifies when the nurse enters a patient’s room, and the badge color changes to yellow.The nurse washes his or her hands and places them close to the badge. A sensor in the badge detects chemical vapors from the alcohol-based solution. If hands are clean, the badge illuminates a bright green hand symbol.If the nurse fails to sanitize, the badge stays yellow and chirps every 10 seconds for 40 seconds, then flashes red. Once the flashing red starts, the nurse has another 30 seconds to wash up, otherwise the badge turns solid red, denoting non-compliance. Either way, each instance is tracked by a computer. The hospital can track each individual’s compliance.

http://www.pressherald.com/news/Hospitals-seek-high-tech-help-for-hand-hygiene-.html?pagenum=2