Tag Archives: C. diff. Disinfectant for Healthcare

Reviewing the Benefits Of Enhanced Terminal Room (BETR-D) Disinfection Study, C.difficile Infection Rates Unchanged

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If you are concerned about C. difficile Infections being battled in Hospitals today review the Abstract and Scientific evidence from the 2015  BETR-D Study

“….adding UV light to bleach in rooms linked to C. difficile had no effect, ” Dr. Deverick J. Anderson, MD, MPH, FIDSA, FSHEA reported

 

MedPage Today  http://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/idweek/54043

Adding ultraviolet light or bleach plus UV light also showed a trend toward a reduced risk, Anderson said at the IDWeek meeting, held in 2015 jointly by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA), the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS).

On the other hand, the benefit of what Anderson called “enhanced terminal disinfection” varied among the four pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), multidrug-resistant (MDR) acetinobacter, and Clostridium difficile.

   What was the BETR-D Study?

The BETR-Disinfection study was performed over 28 months in 9 study hospitals from 4/2012 to 7/2014.

  • Each hospital used four strategies for terminal room disinfection in a randomized sequence.
  • Each strategy was used for 7-month study arms, including a 1 month wash-in period.
  • Two of these strategies used a UV-C emitting device.
  • Standard cleaning involved the use of a quaternary ammonium (reference group A). Three enhanced cleaning strategies were evaluated and compared to the reference: quaternary ammonium + UV-C (B), bleach (C), and bleach + UV-C (D).Of  note, bleach was used for daily and terminal disinfection of all known C. difficile rooms, regardless of study arm.
  • Study cleaning strategies were employed in seed rooms, defined as a room containing a patient on contact precautions for infection or colonization due to the following 4 target MDROs was discharged: MRSA, VRE, C. difficile, or MDR Acinetobacter.
  • The next patient in the room was considered an exposed patient.
  • Primary outcome was the clinical incidence of all target MDROs in patients exposed for at least 24 hours, defined as the first positive culture of a MDRO a) during exposure to the seed room, if positivity occurred ≥48 hr post-admission to the seed room, or b) in the 90 days following seed room exposure for MRSA, VRE, and MDR-Acinetobacter and 28 days for C. difficile.
  • Rates were calculated as outcome/10,000 exposure days using intention-to-treat and per protocol principles

To read the study Abstract in its entirety please click on the following link:

https://idsa.confex.com/idsa/2015/webprogram/Paper53062.html

A study of a large cluster-randomized trial, adding bleach to the standard quaternary ammonium cleaning significantly reduced the risk of transmission of four organisms that cause healthcare-associated infections

A Cluster Randomized, Multicenter Crossover Study with 2×2 Factorial Design to Evaluate the Impact of Enhanced Terminal Room Disinfection on Acquisition and Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Organisms (MDRO)

Anderson and colleagues in the Duke Infection Control Outreach Network tested the four cleaning strategies over 28 months in nine hospitals, with hospitals switching strategies every 7 months.

The goal was to see if they could reduce the overall incidence of the targeted pathogens among patients using a room immediately after a patient known to be colonized or infected by one of the four occupied it. A second primary endpoint was the effect on C. difficile.

He noted that all rooms in which a patient had had C. difficile were cleaned with bleach, so the comparisons were actually between quaternary ammonium and bleach and the same approach adding UV light.

All told, the study had 23,272 patients potentially exposed to a pathogen — they spent at least 24 hours in one of the “seed” rooms where the previous patient had been identified as having one of the pathogens.

Patients in seed rooms became cases if they developed colonization or infection by the pathogens linked to their rooms, as long as they had no history of the pathogen in the previous year and no evidence of community acquisition, he said.

In the four arms, Anderson reported:

  • There were 115 cases in 22,426 exposure days in the standard cleaning arm, for a rate of 51.3 cases per 10,000 exposure days.
  • In the arm adding ultraviolet, there were 76 cases in 22,389 exposure days for a rate of 33.9
  • When bleach was added, there were 101 cases in 24,261 exposure days, for a rate of 41.6.
  • And when both bleach and UV were added, there were 131 cases in 28,757 exposure days, for a rate of 45.6.

The reductions, compared with standard cleaning, were 30%, 15% and 9%, respectively, but only the addition of UV light to quaternary ammonium reached statistical significance (P=0.036).

There were too few cases of MDR acetinobacter to quantify, he said, but it was possible to judge the effect of the various interventions on the other three pathogens.

For MRSA, adding UV light to quaternary ammonium reduced the risk of transmission by 22%, but the difference from standard cleaning fell short of statistical significance. The other two interventions made no difference.

For VRE, on the other hand, all three test strategies reduced the risk of transmission by about 60% — 59% for UV, 57% for bleach, and 64% for bleach plus UV. However, Anderson said, the UV arm was just short of statistical significance, while the other two were significantly different from standard cleaning (P=0.049 and P=0.003, respectively).

But adding UV light to bleach in rooms linked to C. difficile had no effect, Anderson reported.

Note: Not all UV disinfecting products are the same– in the way they are scientifically developed, manufactured, and utilized in the healthcare industry.  It is favorable for Hospital and Healthcare facility decision-makers to ask some tough questions when it comes to evaluating UV technologies. The gold standard for assessing new technologies is to evaluate peer-reviewed literature published and also cited in The Lancet publication.  Please click on the The Lancet article link below to retrieve additional information focused on the BETR-D study.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31588-4/abstract

Findings

31 226 patients were exposed; 21 395 (69%) met all inclusion criteria, including 4916 in the reference group, 5178 in the UV group, 5438 in the bleach group, and 5863 in the bleach and UV group. 115 patients had the primary outcome during 22 426 exposure days in the reference group (51·3 per 10 000 exposure days). The incidence of target organisms among exposed patients was significantly lower after adding UV to standard cleaning strategies (n=76; 33·9 cases per 10 000 exposure days; relative risk [RR] 0·70, 95% CI 0·50–0·98; p=0·036). The primary outcome was not statistically lower with bleach (n=101; 41·6 cases per 10 000 exposure days; RR 0·85, 95% CI 0·69–1·04; p=0·116), or bleach and UV (n=131; 45·6 cases per 10 000 exposure days; RR 0·91, 95% CI 0·76–1·09; p=0·303) among exposed patients. Similarly, the incidence of C difficile infection among exposed patients was not changed after adding UV to cleaning with bleach (n=38 vs 36; 30·4 cases vs 31·6 cases per 10 000 exposure days; RR 1·0, 95% CI 0·57–1·75; p=0·997).

The BETR-D study was supported by the CDC

 

Cdiffradio.com

Cdiffradio.com

 

 

 

Listen to Deverick J. Anderson, MD, MPH, FIDSA, FSHEA discuss UV Intervention Addressing C. difficile and Other Pathogens   July 2016

https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/94128/uv-intervention-addressing-c-difficile-and-other-pathogens

 

 

*PLEASE NOTE – The C Diff Foundation does not endorse any products, medications,  and/or clinical study in progress. All website postings are strictly for informational purposes only.

 

C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

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September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Cdiff2015-1Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

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REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

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Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

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 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

Follow us on Twitter
@cdiffFoundation
#Cdiff2016

NEW Clorox Healthcare Fuzion Cleaner Disinfectant Kills 36 Microorganisms, Including C. difficile Spores, In 2 Minutes Or Less

Fuzion-hero-centered-new

CLOROX HEATLHCARE

Kills 36 Microorganisms in 2 Minutes or Less

Now You Can Use Bleach in More Places than Ever Before     HEALTHCARE

A next-generation bleach product that kills C. difficile spores in 2 minutes, has broad surface compatibility for everyday use, and has a low odor that disappears within minutes.

Use Sites and Applications

Medical: Autoclaves, bedrails, bedside tables, carts, counters, computer screens, diagnostic equipment, dialysis machines, glucometers, gurneys, IV pumps, patient monitoring equipment, plastic mattress covers, remote controls, shower fixtures, stretchers, toilet handholds, walls around toilet/patient rooms, wash basins, wheelchairs, x-ray equipment

  • Dental: Countertops, dentist chairs, endodontic equipment, instrument trays, light lens covers, operatory surfaces, reception counters/desks
  • Veterinary: Animal equipment, transportation vehicles, veterinary care surfaces
  • General Use/Miscellaneous surfaces: Bed frames, doorknobs, hand railings, changing tables, highchairs, playpens, bath tubs, sinks and toilets

 

Directions for Use

  1. REMOVE gross soil if visible. For C. difficile spores and TB, always clean surface prior to disinfecting.
  2. SPRAY 6″–8″ from surface until surface is completely wet.
  3. To DISINFECT, let stand for 1 minute. To kill C. difficile spores, allow 2 minutes contact.
  4. WIPE with a clean, damp cloth. Allow to air dry.

CAUTION: Moderate eye irritant. Do not get in eyes or on clothing. Wash thoroughly with soap and water after handling and before eating, drinking, chewing gum, using tobacco, or going to the toilet.

Click on the link below to be redirected to the Clorox Healthcare website:

https://www.cloroxprofessional.com/products/clorox-healthcare-fuzion-cleaner-disinfectant/at-a-glance/

  • Please Contact CLOROX HEALTHCARE with any questions or concerns regarding Clorox products.

 

NOTE:  The C Diff Foundation Does Not Endorse or Promote Any Products Or Services Shared On This Website, This Posting Is Strictly For Information Purposes Only.