Tag Archives: Healthcare providers

C. difficile Infection (CDI) C Diff Foundation Opens a New Avenue – C. diff. Nationwide Community Support Program

CdiffForRelease-1

The C Diff Foundation introduces the  C. diff. Nationwide Community Support (CDNCS) program beginning in November  for patients, families, survivors and for anyone seeking information and support.

C. difficile (C. diff.) infections caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a 2015 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In addition, an estimated 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making them a substantial cause of infectious disease death in the United States. [i].

As of 2015, there is an absence of professional C. diff. (CDI) support groups in America. The          C Diff Foundation has pioneered a collaborative plan and developed support groups in a variety of availability and locations to meet the needs of individuals seeking C. diff. information and support.

“We found it to be of the utmost importance to implement this new pathway for support and healing after speaking with numerous patients, family members, and fellow-C. diff. survivors,”

We now speak for the thousands of patients within the United States who, each year, are diagnosed with a C. diff. infection. This growth, in part, reflects the value C. diff. support groups will provide, not only to patients, their spouses, and families who are living with and recovering from a C. diff. infection, but also to the countless number of individuals who will become more aware of a C. diff. infection, the importance of early detection, appropriate treatments, and environmental safety protocols. There will also be Bereavement support group sessions for   C. diff. survivors mourning the loss of loved ones following their death from C. diff. infection involvement.

Beginning November 2015 the CDNCS groups will be available to all individuals via: Teleconferencing with some groups advancing and adding computer application programs in 2016. CDNCS groups will provide support and information  to 15 participants in each session.

The CDNCS program sessions will be hosted via: Teleconferencing with leaders hosting from Maryland, Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, and Oregon.

The Colorado CDNCS group is offered at a public venue and will be hosted in Arvada, Colo. every third Tuesday of each month, beginning November 17th. The Meeting will start at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7 p.m lead by a C Diff Foundation Volunteer Advocate and C. diff. survivor          Mr. Roy Poole.

To participate in any CDNCS group being offered during each month, all interested participants will be asked to register through the Nationwide Hot-Line (1-844-FOR-CDIF) or through the   website http://cdifffoundation.org/ where registered individuals will receive a reply e-mail containing support group access information.

  • The Support Registration Page  will be available on November 1st.

The C. diff. Nationwide Community Support group leaders will provide a menu of topics being shared each month on the C Diff Foundation’s website ranging from Financial Crisis Relief, Bereavement, Nutrition, Mental Health, to C. diff. infection updates and everyday life during and after being treated for a prolonged illness. Teleconference sessions will also host healthcare professional topic experts

There is evidence that people who attend support group meetings have a better understanding of the illness and their treatment choices. They also tend to experience less anxiety, develop a more positive outlook, and a better ability to cope and adapt to life during and after the treatment for C. diff.

There is a Purpose:

A diagnosis of a C. diff. infection is unexpected and almost always traumatic. As a result, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed patients to experience a wide range of emotions including, confusion, bewilderment, anger, fear, panic, and denial. Many people find that just having an opportunity to talk with another person, who has experienced the same situation, to help alleviate some of the anxiety and distress they commonly experience.

Individuals also find that they benefit not only from the support they receive, but also from the sense of well-being they gain from helping others. It has been said “support is not something you do for others but rather something you do with others.”

“None of us can do this alone – all of us can do this together.”

 

Follow the C Diff Foundation on Twitter @cdiffFoundation #cdiff2015 and                                        Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CdiffFoundationRadio.

Note/citation: [i] http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/biggest_threats.html

Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI, C. diff. ) for Healthcare Providers

Patients admitted to an ICU for Clostridium difficile infection were at risk for developing subsequent C. difficile infections, according to recent research.

To read this article in its entirety:

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/gastrointestinal-infections/news/online/%7Be22ec9f0-c474-4753-9b95-2084d4f9b177%7D/icu-patients-admitted-with-c-difficile-colonization-at-risk-for-subsequent-infections

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Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) warranting admission to the ICU may benefit from a treatment regimen of combined oral vancomycin and IV metronidazole, according to recent findings.

To read article in its entirety: 

http://www.healio.com/infectious-disease/gastrointestinal-infections/news/online/%7B86429037-44a1-4ac3-9241-b2a8f31d9312%7D/c-difficile-patients-benefit-from-oral-vancomycin-iv-metronidazole-combination

In a retrospective, observational, comparative study, researchers evaluated 88 critically ill adult patients with C. difficile who were admitted to the ICU at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center between June 2007 and September 2012. All patients were treated for CDI with oral vancomycin, and those in the combination therapy group received concomitant metronidazole intravenously for a minimum of 72 hours. Patients were matched and equally placed within either the combination or vancomycin-only groups using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) metric. The patients were clinically and demographically comparable, although the combination therapy group had a higher prevalence of moderate-to-severe renal disease.

The study’s primary outcome was in-hospital death, and secondary outcomes included clinical success at days 6, 10 and 21; hospital length of stay after diagnosis of CDI; and duration of ICU stay after diagnosis of CDI. Multivariable analysis was used to identify factors independently correlated with survival.

C. difficile infections With Challenging Nutritional Intake Imbalances; Malnutrition

NurseCadeceus

A C. difficile infection effects the gastrointestinal system.

What Is the Gastrointestinal System?
The human gastrointestinal system or GI tract, is an organ system responsible for consuming and digesting food, absorbing nutrients, and expelling waste (fecal matter).  The whole digestive tract is about nine meters (30 feet) in length. (1)

  1. Food enters through the mouth and is broken down by saliva and the act of chewing. It passes through the esophagus until it reaches the stomach.
  2. The stomach uses acids and enzymes to convert food into a semi-liquid state called chyme. The stomach then expels the chyme into the small intestine.
  3. The small intestine is the portal for all nutrients to enter into the bloodstream. Crucial digestive enzymes and hormones secreted from the pancreas, liver, and gallbladder break down the semi-liquid chyme into molecules small enough to be absorbed into the bloodstream.
  4. Any leftover food goes into the large intestine, where it is converted into solid waste with the help of bacteria. Water and salts are extracted from any undigested food. The end-product (fecal matter) is expelled through the rectum and anus.

Malnutrition may be broadly defined as nutritional imbalance.

More specifically, it has been defined by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as consisting of any two or more of the following:

  • Insufficient  intake
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Loss of subcutaneous fat
  • Localized or generalized fluid accumulation that may mask weight loss
  • Diminished functional status as measured by hand-grip strength

(1) http://naturopathconnect.com

Patients who are nutritionally challenged and have subsequently restrict their diets to an excessive degree are at higher risk for micro-nutrient and macro-nutrient deficiency. Deficiencies can arise from altered nutrition and poor intake from many illnesses.

A Zinc deficiency may present with a rash that can resemble contact dermatitis or seborrheic dermatitis and can be best described as eczematous pink scaly plaques that may evolve into vesicular, bullous, pustular, or desquamative lesions. Patients with severe zinc deficiency will experience growth delay, mental slowing, poor wound healing, anemia, photophobia, hypogeusia, and anorexia. Zinc is an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining a sense of smell, keeping a healthy immune system, building proteins, triggering enzymes, and creating DNA. Zinc also helps the cells in your body communicate by functioning as a neurotransmitter. A deficiency in zinc can lead to stunted growth, diarrhea, impotence, hair loss, eye and skin lesions, impaired appetite, and depressed immunity. Conversely, consuming too much zinc can lead to nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and headaches in the short term, and can disrupt absorption of copper and iron in the long term. If you have a zinc deficiency, then animal foods are better sources of zinc than plant foods.  Main foods high in Zinc:  Lamb, Wheat-germ, Spinach, Pork, Chicken, Beans.

Vitamin C plays an important role in maintaining connective tissue by virtue of its effect on the hydroxylation of proline and lysine. Patients with scurvy are prone to easy bruising, hemorrhage, fatigue, weakness, and gingivitis. Treatment consists of oral repletion of vitamin C. Foods high in Vitamin C include bell peppers (yellow), dark leafy greens, kiwis, broccoli, berries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, peas, and papayas.

The elderly patients, and patients nutritionally challenged (e.g. C. diff. infections, IBS, Crohn’s, etc.) are at higher risks for developing protein engery malnutrition (PEM) as a consequence of several factors. One is from the inability to maintain adequate nutrition due to the symptoms created by  a C. difficile infection and other GI diagnosis.  Secondary is related to the loss of employment and wages resulting in the inability to acquire food and food products/supplements. Long-term poor nutrition can also result in poor oral health and dental problems which can also lead to difficulty in chewing.  There are many factors that can lead to malnutrition. * Discussing dietary challenges with a healthcare provider is important and asking for a dietary consult with a Registered Dietician is always helpful *  Protein is also essential for the healing of wounds. Accordingly, increasing this patient’s protein intake is a priority. A deficiency in protein leads to muscle atrophy, and impaired functioning of the human body in general. High protein foods include meat, fish, cheese, tofu, beans, eggs, lentils, yogurt, Not everybody needs the same amount of protein. (2) Protein servings of meat, poultry, or fish, should be the size and thickness of the palm of your hand, That’s about a 3-ounce portion. Meat eaters eat no more than two palm-sized servings of meat a day to get enough — but not too much — protein.  Patients with decreased kidney functions need to discuss dietary needs with their healthcare professional and referral/consult with a Registered Dietician for guidance.  To look at it another way, protein should take up no more than one-third of your plate at meals, whether it’s in a form you can drink or chew, Include small amounts of protein foods at every meal to spread your intake evenly throughout the day. (2)

(2) Wedmd.com

Malnutrition can also be diagnosed with a CT scan: A patient can be diagnosed with malnutrition from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with significant weight changes and altered bowel habits. In addition, the albumin level, if checked, will be low = malnutrition.

Physical findings that are associated with PEM (Protein – energy Malnutrition) include the following:

  • Decreased subcutaneous tissue: Areas that are most affected are the legs, arms, buttocks, and face
  • Edema: Areas that are most affected are the distal extremities and anasarca (generalized edema)
  • Oral changes: Cheilosis, angular stomatitis, and papillar atrophy
  • Abdominal findings: Abdominal distention secondary to poor abdominal musculature and hepatomegaly secondary to fatty infiltration
  • Skin changes: Dry, peeling skin with raw, exposed areas; hyperpigmented plaques over areas of trauma
  • Nail changes: Fissured or ridged nails
  • Hair changes: Thin, sparse, brittle hair that is easily pulled out

Protein Studies include:  Measures of protein nutritional status include levels of the following:

  • Serum albumin
  • Retinol-binding protein
  • Prealbumin
  • Transferrin
  • Creatinine
  • Blood urea nitrogen

* If a loved one or if you are nutritionally challenged at any time, from any illness, contact your healthcare provider as soon as possible and discuss the symptoms and complications associated with maintaining an adequate nutritional diet or hydration.  Clear liquid diets are ONLY for three days and Full Liquid diets are ONLY to be used during the direct healthcare provider supervision and frequent monitoring.

 

* The information provided on the website is for educational use only and not for physical or mental health assessment, diagnosis, or treatment for any illness or symptoms.  Please see disclaimer.  Always seek medical care and contact healthcare providers as soon as possible for full medical exams, diagnosis, and treatments. Thank you.

C. diff. Radio talk show “C.diff. Spores and More” debuts on Tuesday, March 3rd

What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?

Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

#Cdiffradio

We invite you to join us in listening to this exciting, new internet talk show when it debuts Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015 at the following times:

ET   2 – 3 p.m.,  CT 1 – 2 p.m.,  MT 12 – 1 p.m.,  PT 11 – 12 p.m.

We are so excited to share the debut of “C. diff. Spores and More” with you – not only because the C Diff Foundation, our Founding Executive Director –  Nancy C. Caralla, and Chairperson of Research and Development – Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, are introducing the first episode, but also because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. In March, 2012 the  CDC  said in a report that the C difficile infection kills 14,000 people a year. But that estimate is based on death certificates, which often don’t list the infection when patients die from complications, such as kidney failure.  Hospital billing data collected by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality shows that more than 9% of C. diff-related hospitalizations end in death — nearly five times the rate for other hospital stays. That adds up to more than 30,000 fatalities among the 347,000 C. diff hospitalizations in 2010. Thousands more patients are treated in nursing homes, clinics and doctors’ offices.

“We’re talking in the range of close to 500,000 total cases a year,” says Cliff McDonald, a C. diff expert and senior science adviser in the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. And annual fatalities “may well be … as high as * 30,000.”

* AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed            C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” will spotlight world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more. Through their interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Please join us in listening to the first of many episodes of C. diff. Spores and More” debuting on Tuesday, March 3rd .

View the programs and radio information:

health.voiceamerica.com

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

C Diff Foundation launches C. diff. Radio, “C. diff. Spores and More” on March 3rd, 2015

What’s new in the C Diff Foundation?  Let us introduce you to the first internet radio talk show dedicated to C. diff. and more……

C. diff. Spores and More”

We invite you to join us in listening to this exciing, new internet talk show when it debuts Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015 at the following times:

ET   2 – 3 p.m.,  CT 1 – 2 p.m.,  MT 12 – 1 p.m.,  PT 11 – 12 p.m.

We are so excited to share the debut of “C. diff. Spores and More” with you – not only because the C Diff Foundation, our Founding Executive Director –  Nancy C. Caralla, and Chairperson of Research and Development – Dr. Chandrabali Ghose, are introducing the first episode, but also because, as advocates of C. diff., we are very excited about what this cutting-edge new weekly radio show means for our Foundation’s community worldwide.

Fact: Deaths and illnesses are much higher than reports have shown. In March, 2012 the  CDC  said in a report that the C difficile infection kills 14,000 people a year. But that estimate is based on death certificates, which often don’t list the infection when patients die from complications, such as kidney failure.  Hospital billing data collected by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality shows that more than 9% of C. diff-related hospitalizations end in death — nearly five times the rate for other hospital stays. That adds up to more than 30,000 fatalities among the 347,000 C. diff hospitalizations in 2010. Thousands more patients are treated in nursing homes, clinics and doctors’ offices.

“We’re talking in the range of close to 500,000 total cases a year,” says Cliff McDonald, a C. diff expert and senior science adviser in the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion. And annual fatalities “may well be … as high as * 30,000.”

* AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

“This does not include the number of C. diff. infections taking place and being treated in other countries.”  “The  CDF supports hundreds of communities by sharing the CDF mission and    raising C. diff. awareness to healthcare professionals, individuals, patients, families,  and communities working towards a shared goal ~  witnessing a reduction of newly diagnosed                   C. diff. cases by 2020 .”   ” The CDF Volunteers are greatly appreciated as they create positive changes sharing their time so generously worldwide aiding in the success of our mission and raising C. diff. awareness.”

C. diff. Spores and More” will spotlight world renown topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives, C. diff. survivors, board members, and their volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community and more. Through their interviews, the CDF mission will connect, educate, and empower many in over 180 countries.

Please join us in listening to the first of many episodes of C. diff. Spores and More” debuting on Tuesday, March 3rd .

View the programs and radio information:

health.voiceamerica.com

Take our show on the go…………..download a mobile app today

http://www.voiceamerica.com/company/mobileapps

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