Tag Archives: Microbiome Research

July 19th Join C. diff. Spores and More With Dr. Matthew Henn – Discussing The Role Of the Microbiome In Health and Disease: The Basics

 

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On  July 19th,  2016

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C. diff. Spores and More,”™ Global Broadcasting Network – innovative and educational interactive healthcare talk radio program discusses

This Episode:  

The Role of the Microbiome in Health and Disease: The Basics

With Our Guest

Dr. Matthew Henn,  Senior Vice President, Head of Drug Discovery and Bioinformatics

Matthew Henn is the Senior Vice President and Head of Drug Discovery & Bioinformatics of Seres Therapeutics, Inc. He has more than 16 years of combined research experience in microbial ecology, genomics, and bioinformatics that spans both environmental and infectious disease applications.

Dr. Henn’s research has focused on the development, implementation, and application of genomic technologies in the area of microbial populations and their metabolic functions. Prior to joining Seres, he was the Director of Viral Genomics and Assistant Director of the Genome Sequencing Center for Infectious Diseases at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Join us on Tuesday, July 19th as Dr. Henn provides the foundation educational information about the microbiome by answering the fundamental questions of what is it, why is it important, how does it impact patients with C. difficile infections, and what are the possibilities of the microbiome as a therapeutic target for future drugs.  This interview will solely be with Dr. Matthew Henn, Senior Vice President and Head of Drug Discovery & Bioinformatics at Seres Therapeutics, Inc,.

Seres Therapeutics is a leading microbiome therapeutics company dedicated to creating a new class of medicines to treat diseases resulting from imbalances in the microbiome.  These first-in-class drugs, called Ecobiotics®, are ecological compositions of beneficial organisms that are designed to restore a healthy human microbiome. The discovery efforts at Seres Therapeutics currently span metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious diseases.

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C. diff. Spores and More ™“ Global Broadcasting Network spotlights world renowned topic experts, research scientists, healthcare professionals, organization representatives,C. diff. survivors, board members, and C Diff Foundation volunteers who are all creating positive changes in the C. diff. community worldwide.

Through their interviews, the C Diff Foundation mission will connect, educate, and empower many worldwide.

Questions received through the show page portal will be reviewed and addressed  by the show’s Medical Correspondent, Dr. Fred Zar, MD, FACP,  Dr. Fred Zar is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Vice HeZarPhotoWebsiteTop (2)ad for Education in the Department of Medicine, and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Over the last two decades he has been a pioneer in the study of the treatment of
Clostridium difficile disease and the need to stratify patients by disease severity.

To access the C. diff. Spores and More program page and library, please click on the following link:    www.voiceamerica.com/show/2441/c-diff-spores-and-more

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C. difficile Infection (CDI) Prevention, Treatment, Environmental Safety, Research, Clinical Trials Being Discussed with World Topic Experts On September 20th In Atlanta, Georgia USA

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September 20th

It is with great pride and certainty in the power of the healthcare community to present the 4th Annual International Raising. C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

being hosted at the

DoubleTree by Hilton — Atlanta Airport 
3400 Norman Berry Drive
Atlanta,Georgia 30344 USA  (Hotel Phone: 1-404-763-1600)

Doors open at 7:15 a.m — Sign In and Continental Breakfast

Conference begins at: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Raising C. difficile awareness is essential to build upon and advance existing knowledge and necessary for overcoming the challenges our healthcare communities are faced with today.

“None of us can do this alone — All of us can do this together”

Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   C. diff. is a leading cause of infectious disease death worldwide; 29,000 died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis in the USA.   Previous studies indicate that C. diff. has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections found in U.S. hospitals driving up costs to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs in acute care facilities alone.

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Cdiff2015-1Clinical professionals gather for one day to present up-to-date data to expand on the existing knowledge and raise awareness of the urgency focused on a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) —

    • Prevention
    • Treatments
    • Research
    • Environmental Safety
    • Clinical trials and studies

WITH

  • Microbiome research, studies
  • Infection Prevention
  • Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants for Adults & Pediatrics
  • A Panel Of C. diff. Infection Survivors
  • Antibiotic Stewardship
  • Healthcare EXPO
    ……………………and much more.

You won’t want to miss out on this opportunity to learn from
International topic experts delivering data directed at evidence-based
prevention, treatments, and environmental safety in the C. diff.
and healthcare community.

Gain insights on September 20th that will not be available anywhere else with an opportunity to receive up-to-date data on major topics in this program being presented in one day.

5 Leading reasons to attend this dynamic conference:

  • Learn from leading healthcare professionals, clinicians, researchers, and industry.
  • Networking opportunities with new and reconnect with those in the healthcare community with similar interests.
  • Gain breakthrough results through research in progress and gaining positive results. Programs focused on Antibiotic-resistance such as the  Antibiotic Stewardship making a difference. Front line developments in progress focused on C. diff. infection prevention, treatments, environmental safety.
  • Implement and share the knowledge well after the conference ends.  Every attendee receives a booklet with guest speakers information, media to review audio programs, and Health Expo Sponsor information focused on the important agenda topics.
  • Embrace the opportunity, with all of the topic experts presenting, and hold the conference in the highest priority from the participation in this conference to an audience of medical students, and fellow healthcare professionals, who will benefit the most from the data and gain tools to overcome the barriers facing healthcare each day.

“The information and up-to-date studies shared at the 2015 conference added to an existing knowledge base that helps us to continue delivering quality care in the medical community.”   Linda Davis, RN,BSN

 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

REGISTRATION FEES:

$75.00  —  Conference Registration

$30.00  —  Student Conference Registration (Student ID To Be Presented At the Door)

TO REGISTER Click on the “Raising C. diff. Awareness” Ribbon below

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Room accommodations are available —  Complete and Confirm 

by August 19th to reserve your hotel reservations.   

To create a reservation please click on the DoubleTree By Hilton Logo below – – – – – –

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……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

 A suggested travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

 For Additional Information visit the C Diff Foundation Website:

https://cdifffoundation.org/

https://cdifffoundation.org/

And Click on the 2016 September Conference Tab

 

Follow us on Twitter
@cdiffFoundation
#Cdiff2016

Vedanta Biosciences Raised $50 Million With Plans To Advance Precise Cocktails Of Bacteria Into Clinical Testing

vedanta

 

 

 

Vedanta Biosciences of Cambridge, MA, has raised $50 million with plans to take advance a number of drugs—precise cocktails of bacteria—into clinical testing.

Formed by company creator PureTech Health six years ago,

Vedanta is trying to understand the relationship between the microbiome and human disease.

The quest to understand the human microbiome has been picking up steam. In Washington, the Obama administration just launched the $121 million Microbiome Initiative, adding to a string of high-profile initiatives in cancer, brain research, and precision medicine. And microbiome drugs are making their way into testing.

The most advanced candidate, SER-109 from Seres Health, is in mid-stage trials for a dangerous gastrointestinal infection called clostridium difficile (C. diff). Data should come this quarter.

These therapies have several different forms. Enterome and Second Genome are developing small molecule drugs to modify the way bacteria interact with their host’s gut. Synlogic and EnBiotix are genetically engineering bacteria. Vedanta and Seres pack strains of bacteria into a pill.

Other than Seres’s C. difficile treatment and a follow-on drug for ulcerative colitis, all of these efforts are preclinical.

But Vedanta CEO and PureTech vice president Bernat Olle views SER-109 as just the beginning for microbiome drugs.

“Clinically it’s been very successful and it’s helped bring the field a lot of attention that otherwise wouldn’t have been received, but I’ve always seen it as a first generation approach that over time ought to be replaced by more refined approaches,” he says.

Vedanta’s first candidate is VE-202, for inflammatory bowel disease, and should begin its first trial in the first half of next year, according Olle.

Johnson & Johnson, which inked a $339 million licensing deal with Vedanta in 2015, will be in charge of VE-202 development. Vedanta is broadening its efforts into infectious diseases (hospital-acquired infections that can’t be controlled by antibiotics), allergies, and potentially cancer. Everything in its pipeline is made from cocktails of live bacteria.

Olle says Vedanta can expand thanks to a deeper understanding how the immune system and gut microbes interact. Initially the company focused on microbes that might help tamp down immune responses—and thus treat autoimmune diseases like IBD.

But Vedanta has since identified microbes that do the opposite: they help rev up the body’s defenses, perhaps to mount a stronger fight against an infection or respond to cancer. Vedanta is trying to amass a library of these strains, much like a pharma company might have a slew of chemical compounds to screen through. “We’re trying to make this a more rational, controllable type of approach,” Olle says.

The new $50 million infusioncomes from new backers Rock Springs Capital, the microbiome-focused fund Health For Life Capital, and Invesco Asset Management (one of PureTech’s investors). PureTech also participated.

Vedanta recently moved out of Cambridge’s LabCentral incubator and into 9,000 square feet in Cambridge. It’s hired several executives, among them chief scientific officer Bruce Roberts, formerly of Genzyme, and head of manufacturing Dan Couto, recently of Sepracor.

The cash will help Vedanta drive “multiple” programs towards clinical testing, Olle says, boost its manufacturing capability, and double its staff to 30.

To read article in its entirety:

http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2016/06/06/vedanta-nabs-50m-to-expand-microbiome-into-immune-boosting-therapies/#

Seres Therapeutics, Inc., A Leading Microbiome Therapeutics Company, Announced Positive Results From the Phase 1b/2 Study of SER-109 In Recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI)

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“The impressive level of efficacy observed with SER-109 treatment is striking when compared with the high rate of recurrence expected in this population,” said Dr. Stuart H. Cohen, MD, Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, Davis. “These results demonstrate the potential of SER-109 to effectively treat recurrent CDI. With current treatment approaches having significant limitations, SER-109 has the potential to fundamentally change the management of this urgent health issue.”

Abstract

Background. Patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have a ≥60% risk of relapse, as conventional therapies do not address the underlying gastrointestinal dysbiosis. This exploratory study evaluated the safety and efficacy of bacterial spores for preventing recurrent CDI.

Methods.  Stool specimens from healthy donors were treated with ethanol to eliminate pathogens. The resulting spores were fractionated and encapsulated for oral delivery as SER-109. Following their response to standard-of-care antibiotics, patients in cohort 1 were treated with SER-109 on 2 consecutive days (geometric mean dose, 1.7 × 109 spores), and those in cohort 2 were treated on 1 day (geometric mean dose, 1.1 × 108 spores). The primary efficacy end point was absence of C. difficile–positive diarrhea during an 8-week follow-up period. Microbiome alterations were assessed.

Results.  Thirty patients (median age, 66.5 years; 67% female) were enrolled, and 26 (86.7%) met the primary efficacy end point. Three patients with early, self-limiting C. difficile–positive diarrhea did not require antibiotics and tested negative for C. difficile at 8 weeks; thus, 96.7% (29 of 30) achieved clinical resolution. In parallel, gut microbiota rapidly diversified, with durable engraftment of spores and no outgrowth of non–spore-forming bacteria found after SER-109 treatment. Adverse events included mild diarrhea, abdominal pain, and nausea.

Conclusions.  SER-109 successfully prevented CDI and had a favorable safety profile, supporting a novel microbiome-based intervention as a potential therapy for recurrent CDI.

 

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and its attendant complications, including diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, and toxic megacolon, are associated with an estimated 29 000 annual deaths in the United States and is recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an urgent public health priority [1]. Antibiotic exposure is the leading risk factor for CDI, and the risk of recurrent disease is increased among elderly patients and following antibiotic reexposure. Antibiotic therapy for recurrent CDI contributes to persistent disruption of the gut microbiome, which is the first-line defense against colonization and infection by pathogens, including C. difficile [25]. The risk of recurrence increases to >60% following a second episode [3, 6, 7].

Research has focused on the potential role that the human microbiome plays in health and disease. In 2008, the National Institutes of Health supported the creation of the Human Microbiome Project to characterize the species composition and function of the healthy microbiome. In the gut, the 2 dominant phyla are Firmicutes (ie, gram-positive organisms, including Bacilli and Clostridia) and Bacteroidetes (ie, gram-negative anaerobes, including Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, and Prevotella) [8, 9]. In contrast, gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae, such as Escherichia coli, make up only a fraction of the healthy microbiome [8]. There is also significant intersubject variability at both the genus and species level, suggesting that the bacterial communities in any one individual are unique, mirroring the complex interplay of diet, host genetics, immune response, and microbial coadaptation. Despite this variation, there are common core species found in a majority of healthy individuals, and metabolic pathways are preserved due to functional redundancy [10]. Thus, a wide range of microbiomes defines a healthy state.

In states of disease, there are also broad patterns that define gut dysbiosis, such as a loss of microbial diversity and increasing representation of gram-negative facultative anaerobes, such as Enterobacteriaceae [11, 12]. Antibiotic-induced dysbiosis underlies colonization and invasion by C. difficile, while repair of the microbiome, through fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), is associated with efficacy rates of 81%–90% for those with recurrent CDI [1316]. FMT involves transferring minimally processed, uncharacterized fecal material from a healthy donor to a recipient [17].

FMT administration is often invasive and requires donor screening and stool preparation. Despite donor screening, stool preparations for FMT have the potential to transmit infections due to pathogens that are present at times outside the period of detectability or for which diagnostic tests are unavailable; there is also the possibility of unwitting transmission of emerging pathogens that have not been identified to date [18, 19]. While there have been recent reports of stool delivered via oral encapsulated FMT or stool enemas, the data demonstrate first-dose efficacy of approximately 52%–70%, which is significantly lower than that for other modes of administration, such as colonoscopy [14, 20, 21]. In recognition of FMT as an experimental biologic, the Food and Drug Administration issued guidance that this intervention should only be used for prevention of recurrent CDI and after receipt of informed consent. An alternative approach for achieving improved safety and convenience with comparable efficacy is urgently needed [22].

SER-109 is composed of approximately 50 species of Firmicutes spores derived from stool specimens from healthy donors. After demonstrating the preclinical efficacy of SER-109 in rodent CDI models, we formulated it for oral delivery in humans based on the hypothesis that spore-forming organisms would compete metabolically with C. difficile for essential nutrients and/or bile acids [2327]. In addition, spore purification with ethanol reduces the risk of transmission of other potential pathogens [28]. This initial study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of SER-109 for CDI prevention in patients with recurrent infections and to measure alterations in the gut microbiota.

METHODS

Study Design

This open-label, single-arm, descending-dose study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and engraftment of SER-109 formulated for oral delivery. The study was sponsored by Seres Therapeutics and conducted at 4 US medical centers: Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, Massachusetts), Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota), Miriam Hospital (Providence, Rhode Island), and Emory University Hospital (Atlanta, Georgia). The protocol was developed by investigators at Seres Therapeutics and authors of the current study (E. L. H., D. S. P., and S. K.) and was approved by the institutional review boards of the participating medical centers.

Study Population

Eligible patients were 18–90 years old and had ≥3 laboratory-confirmed CDI episodes in the previous 12 months, had a life expectancy of ≥3 months, and gave informed consent to receive this donor-derived product. Patients were excluded for a history of acute leukemia; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, chemotherapy within 2 months and an absolute neutrophil count of <1000 neutrophils/mm3, a history of inflammatory or irritable bowel disease, colectomy, cirrhosis, pregnancy/lactation, severe acute illness unrelated to CDI, antibiotic exposure for a non-CDI indication within 14 days of screening, or prior FMT.

Eligible patients had a clinical response to antibiotic therapy for their current CDI episode immediately prior to dosing and were neither anticipated to require admission to an intensive care unit nor expected to need antibiotics within 6 weeks following study entry.

Screening of Donors

Seven adult donors of stool specimens gave informed consent, underwent a complete medical history and laboratory assessment, and were screened for blood-borne and fecal pathogens, consistent with published protocols [29, 30]. Donors were excluded for being older than 50 years, having a body mass index (BMI; calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared) of >25, engaging in high-risk behaviors as per a modified American Association of Blood Banks blood donor questionnaire [31], having a history of acute/chronic gastrointestinal disorders, or using antibiotics (in the previous 6 months), immunosuppressive/antineoplastic agents, or cigarettes (Supplementary Materials).

Preparation of SER-109

SER-109 comprises Firmicutes spores fractionated from stool specimens obtained from healthy donors. Donor stool specimens were processed separately to make unique batches of SER-109. Upon collection, stool specimens were frozen at −80°C. Approximately 150 g was suspended and homogenized in normal saline and filtered through mesh screens. The slurry was centrifuged, and supernatant containing bacterial cells and spores was combined with 100% ethanol to 50% (wt/wt) and incubated at room temperature for 1 hour to reduce risk of pathogen transmission to the recipient [28]. The supernatant was pelleted by centrifugation, washed with saline to remove ethanol, resuspended with sterile glycerol, and filled into capsules (hypromellose DRcaps, Capsugel), which were stored at −80°C.

The product was characterized for spore concentration and absence of residual gram-negative bacteria. Spore content was determined by measuring the dipicolinic acid (DPA) content and normalizing against the DPA content of known numbers of spores representing 3 commensal species [32]. The absence of residual gram-negative bacteria was confirmed by selective plating on MacConkey lactose agar and Bacteroides bile esculin agar. No vegetative microbes were found in any SER-109 preparation within the limit of assay detection (<30 colony-forming units/mL).

Treatment Protocol

Two days prior to dosing, patients discontinued antibiotics for CDI. One day prior to dosing, patients underwent a bowel preparation (to minimize residual antibiotic in the gastrointestinal tract), followed by overnight fasting. Two sites used a regimen of 300 mL of magnesium-citrate (one with Dulcolax), and 2 sites used polyethylene glycol.

Part 1 enrolled 15 patients who each received 30 capsules of SER-109 (observed dose of 15 capsules on day 0 and day 1). The dose of spores varied between 3 × 107 and 2 × 1010, based on natural variations in spore concentration among healthy donors. Based on initial efficacy, 15 additional patients were enrolled in part 2 and treated with SER-109 capsules containing a lower fixed dose of 1 × 108 spores (approximately 17-fold lower than the geometric mean dose administered in part 1 and 3-fold above the minimum dose shown to be effective). Depending on spore content, patients received an observed dose of 1–12 capsules on day 0.

Any patient whose diarrhea recurred between 1 and 8 weeks was eligible for another dose of SER-109, based on data from the conventional FMT literature showing efficacy of a second dose [13, 14]. If a patient elected to receive a second dose of SER-109, the time course of study events was restarted concurrent with the second dose of SER-109.

Adverse events and recurrence of CDI symptoms were monitored through phone calls (on day 4 and weeks 1, 2, and 4) and in-clinic visits (on weeks 8 and 24). Patients were asked to provide a stool sample on day 4 and on weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 after treatment for genomic and culture-based analysis.

Clinical Outcomes

The primary end point was prevention of recurrent CDI during the 8-week follow-up after SER-109. CDI recurrence was defined as a composite end point of >3 unformed bowel movements in a 24-hour period and laboratory confirmation of C. difficile in the stool. Safety was evaluated by monitoring adverse events and assessing changes in laboratory values, vital signs, and physical examination findings over a 24-week period after dosing.

Alterations in Gut Microbiota Composition

The impact of SER-109 on gut microbiota was determined by examining stool samples before and after treatment for (1) engraftment by spore-forming species and (2) augmentation (outgrowth) of commensal bacteria not found in SER-109. Alterations in composition were measured by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genomic and culture-based analysis of patient fecal samples (Supplementary Materials). Engraftment was defined by newly detected spore formers in the patient after treatment, which were present in SER-109 but not detectable in the patient before treatment. Augmented bacteria were defined as non–SER-109 organisms whose levels increased at least 10-fold after treatment.

RESULTS

Patient Population

Thirty patients were enrolled after therapeutic response to appropriate CDI antibiotics (ie, vancomycin [n = 23], fidaxomicin [n = 5], metronidazole [n = 1], and rifaximin [n = 1]) was documented (Table 1). Patients had a median age of 66.5 years (range, 22–88 years), and the majority of subjects (67%) were female. The median time from the initial C. difficile diagnosis to the most recent recurrence was 23.1 weeks in cohort 1 and 34.3 weeks in cohort 2. In the overall study population, the median number of CDI recurrences was 3 (range, 2–6 recurrences). Infecting C. difficile strains were identified in 10 patients and included types BI, Y, and DH (Supplementary Table 1).

View this table:

Table 1.

Patient Demographic Characteristics, by Cohort

Complete blood counts and a chemistry panel (including liver function tests and analysis of albumin and creatinine levels) were performed at week 8 (for 27 of 30 patients) and at week 24 or early termination for 20 of 30 patients. No significant changes in laboratory findings were observed, with the exception of those for 1 patient, who had an elevated white blood cell count at week 8 at the time of diagnosis of a urinary tract infection.

Clinical Outcomes

Of the 30 patients who received SER-109, 26 (86.7%) achieved the primary end point of no C. difficile–positive diarrhea up to 8 weeks following dosing, with similar outcomes in both dosing cohorts (Figure 1). Of the patients who met the primary end point, 1 required a second dose of SER-109 for recurrence of C. difficile–positive diarrhea on day 26, as per protocol. Four patients who did not meet the primary end point had early onset of symptoms at days 3, 5, 7, and 9 after administration of SER-109 and laboratory confirmation of C. difficile. One of these patients declined a second SER-109 dose and chose not to continue participating in the study. Notably, the other 3 patients were determined by their primary investigator to be recovering from a self-limiting diarrheal episode at the time of stool submission for C. difficile testing. In each case, the investigators advised the patients to refrain from antibiotic use, and all symptoms resolved without any therapeutic intervention; stool samples from these 3 patients were negative for C. difficile carriage at 8 weeks, using a sensitive nucleic acid amplification test for detection of toxins A and B. Thus, 29 of 30 patients (96.7%) achieved clinical resolution of recurrent CDI following SER-109 administration.

CdiffSeresTherapeuticsFig1

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FOR RESOURCES AND TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN ITS ENTIRETY PLEASE CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK:

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/02/04/infdis.jiv766.full?sid=87ea07a7-7305-4b85-93aa-e808fff35e50

OR

http://www.nfvzone.com/news/2016/02/09/8314032.htm

Microbiome Startup uBiome Plans To Announce A Collaboration With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

uBiome-Logo (2)
uBiome is a biotechnology company based in San Francisco that gives individuals and organizations access to sequencing technology to sequence their microbiomes with a sampling kit and website. The company was founded by Jessica Richman and Zachary Apte in  November 2012,

uBiome plans to announce  a collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to analyze over 10,000 stool samples from hospital patients.

As research into the importance of the bacteria living in people’s guts—the microbiome—has become more common, the potential in turning the genetic sequences of those intestinal critters into a useful tool for doctors is obvious—problem is, it’s only potential. No one has quite figured out how. A healthy community of gut microbes isn’t easily reduced to a single metric, like blood sugar or cholesterol levels. So uBiome and the CDC have set out to develop something a “Microbiome Disruption Index” to track how treatments, like antibiotics, alter gut microbes.

CDC will collect the samples, and uBiome will sequence them.

 

  • Sequence:   uBiome extracts the bacterial DNA out of the sample and  identify each of the bacteria that the DNA came from. It’s a little like dusting a scene for fingerprints.   *1

 

The San Francisco-based startup currently sells microbiome sampling kits directly to consumers, who mail the kits back to uBiome for analysis—much like 23andMe with its DNA sequencing kits. uBiome recently started offering grants in the form of $100,000 worth of kits to researchers. The CDC, which has microbiome on the brain (so to speak), decided to apply. “Working with companies developing expertise in this area is something we’re interested in,” says Alison Halpin, a CDC epidemiologist. “And CDC is always looking for partnerships.”

The collaboration, which will begin early next year, is still fairly open-ended. The CDC has only just started thinking about the Microbiome Disruption Index and how to use it to predict things like whether a patient might be at risk for infections that hang out in hospitals. But if sequencing costs continue to fall says Halpin, “It’s possible for [microbiome sequencing] to become a standard tool. We’re trying to anticipate that by understanding how you interpret that information.”

How to interpret sequencing information is a challenge for uBiome, too, which is expanding its business from direct-to-consumer kits to clinical tests ordered by doctors. “We’re moving into the clinical space in a number of ways,” says cofounder and CEO Jessica Richman. “This collaboration helps us figure out what the problems are.” In other words, this is all very early-days. Richman says that uBiome plans to announce its first clinical test next year, but she declined to give details.

Researchers have linked the makeup of the gut microbiome—with varying degree of certainty—to big things like obesity, cancer, and mental illness. But uBiome is more likely to start smaller, with clearer-cut tests like looking for the presence of nasty bugs such as the Clostridium difficile bacteria. (It causes all sorts of nasty gut problems, and can turn pathogenic when a person’s normal, healthy gut flora get wiped out by a course of antibiotics.) The advantage of microbiome sequencing is that uBiome could look test for several different pathogens at once without having to grow any of them in a petri dish first.

uBiome’s lab is currently certified under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, which allows approved labs to develop new tests without getting individual approval for each one. That could feel like a red flag. Recent controversy over the blood testing company Theranos has highlighted the sometimes loose regulations, and the Food and Drug Administration has it wants to regulate lab tests more strictly.

For now, says Daniel Almonacid, a senior scientist at uBiome, “We assume we’re in good standing because the CLIA requirements are already met.”1

23andMe famously had a big battle with the FDA over the medical information it offered as results for its genetic tests. If uBiome wants to go in that direction, it may end up running into regulation, too. But in the meantime, 10,000 plus samples could be a significant conversion of poop into data.
1 UPDATE: Correction 8:50pm ET 11/30/2015 This quote has been corrected to more accurately reflect uBiome’s CLIA status.

 

*1 http://ubiome.com/

 

To review the article in its entirety click on the following link:

http://www.wired.com/2015/11/ubiome-cdc-collaboration/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

C. difficile, a leading Healthcare-Associated Infection, Brings Together World Topic Experts At the International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO in Boston, MA on November 9th

 2015 International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference & Health EXPO

Boston, MA, USA   ~    November 9th

7:30 a.m – 5:00 p.m

conferencesanjuanprJoin us at our 3rd annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO on November 9th.  Not just another educational conference but one that pairs
world-renowned topic experts with presentations on state-of-the-art health care topics pertaining to a leading Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI); C. difficile

*Prevention
*Treatments
*Research
*Prevention and Treatment Clinical trials and studies
*Microbiome research
*Infection Prevention
*Environmental Safety
*Fecal Microbiota Restoration and Transplants
……………………..and much more.

The panel of world-renowned topic experts will also discuss the burden of C. diff. the risk factors pertaining to current and emerging treatment options along with the importance of applying evidence-based clinical approaches to the prevention of  a C. diff. infection (CDI), one of the leading Hospital-Acquired Infections.

Clostridium difficile (also known as C. diff.) is an important cause of infectious disease death in the United States.  Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) infections in a single year according to a study released February 25, 2015 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). • More than 100,000 of these infections developed among residents of U.S. nursing homes alone.*  Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of a C. diff. infection.   Of these 29,000 – 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly related to a  C. diff. infection. Therefore; C. diff. is an important cause of infectious disease death in the U.S.  (Source: CDC)

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Conference Venue:

Double Tree Suites Hotel – Boston – Cambridge
400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston, MA  02134  USA
1-617-783-0090 For Hotel Accommodations *   * There are hotel accommodations available for Sunday evening offered at a special event rate for guests of the C Diff Foundation.  Please inform the DoubleTree representative at the time of creating a reservation to receive the special event room rate.

Exclusive Admission:   $75.00

Student Admission:     $50.00

Each exclusive and student ticket includes admission to all presentations, formal and informal Q&A sessions, introductions to fellow healthcare professionals, continental breakfast  (7:30 a.m.) , a plated four course luncheon with the choice of Chicken Florentine or Petite Filet Mignon main entree, Access to the Health EXPO, a conference book, a educational DVD, and formal conference program.  

To Register and obtain tickets, please click on the following link

NOTE:  *Presentations should not be recorded audio or video or published without prior written and signed permission from the guest speaker and addressed by each attendee seeking publication of said presentations.

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Guest Speakers

Key Speaker and Conference Chair:  Professor Mark Wilcox;  Professor of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, UK. Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile for the Public Health England. He has formerly been the Director of Infection Prevention, Infection Control Doctor and Clinical Director of Pathology at Leeds Teaching Hospitals.

Dr. John Bartlett, MD; Assistant Professor Medicine, UCLA/Sepulveda Veterans Admin Hospital 1972-5, Associate Professor and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, 1975-80, Professor of Medicine and Chair Division of Infectious Diseases Division, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 1980 – 2006; Professor of Medicine, 2006 – 13; Professor of Medicine emeritus, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2013.Dominant research interests: anaerobic infections and pulmonary infections 1968 – 74; community acquired pneumonia and diagnostic methods, 1974-1980; Bowel prep for elective colon surgery; Protected bronchoscopy brush catheter-1977; Clostridium difficile 1977 – 84, HIV 1983 – 2014; bioterrorism 1999 –2004; Clostridium difficile infection, HIV/AIDS and antibiotic resistance 2006-2013 with  Major current interests: Clostridium difficile infection, HIV infection, antibiotic resistance, careers in infectious diseases.
Presentation Topic: “The discovery of Clostridium difficile as the cause of antibiotic-associated colitis.”

Professor Simon M. Cutting, Professor of Molecular Microbiology at Royal Holloway, University of London is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His D.Phil was on understanding the genetic control of spore formation in Bacillus. After spending 7 years in the renowned laboratory of Professor Richard Losick at Harvard University Biological Laboratories (USA) he spent 3 years as an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in Philadelphia. He returned to the UK in 1996 and since then has worked on developing bacterial spores as novel oral vaccines at
Royal Holloway, University of London. The Cutting lab has developed a number of prototype oral vaccines and is now entering a ‘first in man’ phase 1/IIa clinical trial of a prototype oral vaccine to 
Clostridium difficile (see www.cdvax.org). His other expertise is in the use of Bacillus spores as probiotics and has a number of contracts and consultancies with European and US companies in the food and feed sectors 
(see SporeGen.com).
Presentation Topic: “Mucosal Vaccination: Decolonisation is Essential to Full Protection Against C. difficile

Dr. Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc   Anesthesiologist/Intensive Care physician in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. He is also Assistant Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. Dr. Quraishi’s overall research goal is to better define how macro- and micro-nutrient status influence outcomes during acute stress and critical illness. In particular, his research group has focused on the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D in the perioperative setting, during acute care hospitalization, and for patients in the intensive care unit. Recently, Dr. Quraishi’s group has identified vitamin D status as a potentially modifiable risk factor for hospital acquired C. diff infections and that the severity of C. Diff infections may also be related to vitamin D status .
Presentation Topic:  “Vitamin D as nutritional immunomodulation
for Clostridium difficile infections.”

Dr. Mary Beth Dorr , Phd, studied Pharmacy at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and received a PhD in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism from the University of North Carolina. For the last 28 years Dr. Dorr has worked in the pharmaceutical industry in various capacities, with the majority of the time devoted to the design and implementation of Phase 1 to 4 clinical trials, primarily for anti-infective products.  Prior to joining Merck, Dr. Dorr directed several large, international clinical studies of the efficacy and safety of two IV antibiotics, Synercid and dalbavancin.  She also directed clinical research programs for gastrointestinal and women’s health products.  Mary Beth joined Merck in February 2011 and is currently a Clinical Director in the Late Stage Clinical Development Department as the Clinical Monitor directing 2 large pivotal Phase 3 trials investigating the safety and efficacy of the monoclonal antibodies actoxumab and bezlotoxumab as adjunctive therapy for the prevention of C. difficile recurrence.
Presentation Topic: Bezlotoxumab for Prevention of Recurrent C. difficile Infection in Patients on Standard of Care Antibiotics:  Results of Phase 3 Trials (MODIFY I and MODIFY II)

Dr. Hudson Garrett, Jr., PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP, CSRN, VA-BC, CDONA,FACONA,DON-CLTC
Dr. Hudson Garrett is currently employed as the VP, Clinical Affairs for PDI and NIce-Pak, and is responsible for the global Clinical Affairs program and also the Medical Science Liaison program for all divisions within the company. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology/Chemistry and Nursing, a dual Masters in Nursing and Public Health, Post-Masters Certificate as a Family Nurse Practitioner, a Post-Masters Certificate in Infection Prevention and Infection Control and a PhD in Healthcare Administration and Policy. He has completed the Johns Hopkins Fellows Program in Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, and the CDC Fundamentals of Healthcare Epidemiology program, and is board certified in family practice, critical care, vascular assess, moderate sedation, legal nurse consulting, and a director of nursing in long term care.  Dr. Garrett is also a Fellow in the Academy of National Associations of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care.
Presentation Topic:  Preventing Clostridium difficile thru Antibiotic Stewardship

Dr. David Cook, PhD;  A scientist and entrepreneur who has held senior operating and management positions in the biotechnology industry over his 20-year career. Before joining Seres Therapeutics, he was the chief operating officer for the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, a global R&D organization whose mission is to develop a safe, globally accessible vaccine for HIV. Prior to IAVI, David was the founding CEO at Anza Therapeutics, a biotechnology start-up developing a novel microbial vaccine platform to induce cellular immune responses to fight or prevent diseases such as cancer, hepatitis C, malaria and tuberculosis. He is also a co-inventor on over twenty-five patents. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and his PhD in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr Cook is presently Executive Vice President of R&D, Chief Scientific Officer with Seres Therapeutics, Inc.. Presentation Topic: “The role of the microbiome in resisting
C. difficile infection and the mechanism of Ecobiotic drugs.”

Julie Gubb, PhD, CIC,   has worked in the field of Infection Prevention in varying roles at healthcare facilities in multiple states for more than two decades. After graduating from the University of Detroit Mercy with a degree in Medical Technology, she began her career as Senior Clinical Microbiologist at an acute care hospital in Detroit, Michigan, where she developed an interest in Infection Control while managing the activities of a full-service microbiology laboratory. She was the Director of Infection Control at Mount Clemens Regional Medical Center in Michigan, and has also held positions in Infection Prevention at healthcare facilities in California and Nevada. As a Senior Infection Preventionist for Xenex, Julie works closely with hospitals throughout the United States to understand their infection prevention goals and develop strategies for attaining those goals. As an active member of the national organization Association for Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology (APIC), she has maintained Board Certification in Infection Control and Epidemiology since 1993 and speaks frequently at APIC chapter meetings.
Presentation Topic: Stand Up for Cleanliness / Enhanced Room Disinfection

Dr. Patricia J. Freda Pietrobon, PhD: Associate Vice President, R&D,
Sanofi Pasteur, has over 25 years of experience in the Vaccine & Diagnostic industries and more then 20 years in leadership roles focusing on research & development of new vaccines. Patricia began her career in diagnostic assay development with a focus on validation and quality alignment to regulatory requirements and GXPs. Patricia has been with Sanofi Pasteur for over 25 years and has contributed to the development and licensure of new bacterial & viral vaccines for pediatric & adult populations worldwide.

Barley Chironda, Manager of Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) and Medical Device Reprocessing Device at St. Joseph Health Centre in Toronto, Canada. He is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC TM) and has worked extensively as an Infection Preventionist. Barely has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral changes.   Barley’s presentation will show a behind the scenes account of the C. diff. management from the healthcare facilities perspective while providing a call to action.

Dr. Martha Clokie, PhD, Leicester UK, Professor in Microbiology.  Dr. Cloakie’s research focuses on phages that infect bacterial pathogens of medical relevance and  has published 41 papers in this area. Her major focus has been on Clostridium difficile where she has  isolated a large phage collection. In vitro and in vivo data has shown that the viruses have therapeutic potential. A patent has been filed  on these phages and  working with AmpliPhi to develop a product. Dr. Cloakie  has regular contact with the BBC and other media to talk about her work, and other phage projects, and has consulted with Science museum, London and Eden Project, UK to advise on bacteriophage displays.

Lee Jones, Founder, President and CEO of Rebiotix Inc, has over thirty years of experience in the medical technology industry in large and small companies and academia. Most recently Lee was Chief Administrative Officer of the Schulze Diabetes Institute at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN and is the former president and chief executive officer of Inlet Medical. Inlet Medical was sold to Cooper Surgical in 2006. Lee will introduce Rebiotix Inc.,  a biotechnology company founded in 2011 in Roseville, MN to revolutionize the treatment of challenging gastrointestinal diseases by harnessing the power of the human microbiome The company is developing an entirely new kind of biological drug designed to reverse pathogenic processes responsible for disease through the transplantation of live human-derived microbes into a sick person’s intestinal tract.
Presentation Topic:  Blazing a Trail with the Gut Microbiome

Professor Nancy Sheridan,   a C. diff. Survivor and  Associate Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology and a winner of the prestigious SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Professor Sheridan will share her personal experience being treated for a painful and extended journey with a C. diff. infection (CDI).  Professor Sheridan has been teaching since fall 2000 in the Fashion Merchandising Management Department within the School of Business and Technology. For the past seven years, she has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton Business School to undergraduate and MBA students.

Dr Mel Thomson, PhD,  completed her Honors degree in microbiology and immunology at the University of Melbourne . She then immigrated to the UK where she worked on various projects as diverse as allergy and cancer before undertaking further studies. She completed a Masters of Research in functional genomics before reading for a PhD in microbial genetic regulation in Neisseria species, both at University of York, UK. After the award of her PhD, Dr Thomson became interested the host-pathogen interactions at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK.  Dr Thomson returned to Australia in 2011 to start her own research group studying host-pathogen interactions in the GI tract, at Deakin Medical School. A passionate science communicator, and has recently become a national ‘torch bearer’ for the concept of crowd funding academic research, which a track record of three successful ‘Pozible’ crowd funding campaigns, ‘Mighty Maggots’, ‘Hips 4 Hipsters’ and ‘No more Poo Taboo’
Presentation Topic: All that glitters is C.diff awareness gold and Crowdfunding: The ‘No more poo taboo’ animation”

Dr Rahma Wehelie – LifeClean International AB – Sweden; LifeClean International AB is a Swedish company with an international orientation that conducts research, development, and production in the spore, bacteria, and virus eliminating industry. LifeClean was established in 2013 after many years of research and the headquarter lies in Uddevalla, Sweden.
Presentation Topic: Dr Wehelie will be discussing LifeClean’s research, development and production eliminating Clostridium difficile, Norovirus, and other multidrug-resistant bacteria

Dr. Klaus Gottlieb, MD, FACG,Synthetic Biologics, Inc.,Vice President, Clinical;Regulatory Affairs   Dr. Gottlieb is an experienced board-certified internist and gastroenterologist with a strong clinical science, business and drug development background. He joined Synthetic Biologics after serving as Senior Medical Director-Therapeutic Strategy Lead Gastroenterology of Quintiles, a Fortune 500 company and the world’s largest provider of biopharmaceutical development and commercial outsourcing services. At Quintiles, Dr. Gottlieb served as Global Medical Advisor for three separate large Phase 3 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) trials and provided significant input on the shaping, design and evaluation of numerous IBD and other gastrointestinal (GI) clinical trials throughout all stages of development programs. Prior to joining Quintiles in 2013, he was with the FDA in Silver Spring, MD as a Senior Clinical Reviewer for the Division of Gastroenterology and Inborn Errors Products. Widely published, his academic contributions have been recognized by an appointment as Professor of Medicine (Clinical) at George Washington University and the following elected fellowships: Fellow American College of Physicians, Fellow American College of Gastroenterology, Fellow American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.  Presentation Topic: Protecting the Gut Microbiome

For additional information contact the C Diff Foundation: (919) 201-1512 or
info@cdifffoundation.org

To Register and obtain tickets, please click on the following link

We would like to sincerely thank the following Exclusive and Supporting Corporate Sponsors for their continued support  and joining the Foundation in
Raising C. diff. Awareness worldwide.

  • Enjoy visiting our Exclusive Corporate Sponsors websites by simply clicking on their logos belowsyntheticbiologics
  • AmericanGreenTechnologyhrmsrebiotixlogo

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SANOFI_Pasteur_RVBThis conference is supported through an educational grant from Sanofi Pasteur US

 

MERCKBW2015_medLogoBLK [Converted] (2)This activity has been supported by an independent patient
advocacy grant from Merck & Co., Inc.

#Cdiff2015 International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health Expo

2015 International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference & Health EXPO

Boston, MA, USA

November 9th

8:00 a.m – 5:00 p.m

symposium

Join us at our 3rd annual International Raising C. diff. Awareness Conference and Health EXPO on November 9th as world-renown Healthcare Professionals, Researchers, and Infection Preventionists come together to share the latest data pertaining to C. difficile  infection (CDI) prevention, treatments, clinical trials, environmental safety products, Microbiome research, Healthcare-Associated Infections and much, much  more…………

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Conference Venue:

Double Tree Suites Hotel – Boston – Cambridge
400 Soldiers Field Road, Boston, MA  02134  USA
1-617-783-0090 For Hotel Accommodations *   * There are rooms available for Sunday evening and being offered at a special event rate for guests of the C Diff Foundation.  Please inform the DoubleTree representative at the time of creating a reservation to receive the special event room rate.

Registration Fee:  $75.00

Student Fee:          $50.00

Registration includes the following:   Admission to all presentations, formal and informal Q&A sessions, introductions to fellow healthcare professionals, continental breakfast, a plated luncheon with a choice of main entree  (chicken or beef) and beverages.  access to the Health EXPO exhibits, a conference book containing sponsor information, educational DVD, and a  formal conference program.  

For Tickets and Registration CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING LINK TO ACCESS THE REGISTRATION PAGE:
 

http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=6iomnjnab&oeidk=a07ebaumwu164b799f9

 

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Guest Speakers

Key Speaker and Conference Chair:  Professor Mark Wilcox, Professor of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, UK. Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist, Head of Microbiology and Academic Lead of Pathology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile for the Public Health England. He has formerly been the Director of Infection Prevention, Infection Control Doctor and Clinical Director of Pathology at Leeds Teaching Hospitals.

Dr. John Bartlett, MD; Assistant Professor Medicine, UCLA/Sepulveda Veterans Admin Hospital 1972-5, Associate Professor and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, 1975-80, Professor of Medicine and Chair Division of Infectious Diseases Division, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 1980 – 2006; Professor of Medicine, 2006 – 13; Professor of Medicine emeritus, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2013.Dominant research interests: anaerobic infections and pulmonary infections 1968 – 74; community acquired pneumonia and diagnostic methods, 1974-1980; Bowel prep for elective colon surgery; Protected bronchoscopy brush catheter-1977; Clostridium difficile 1977 – 84, HIV 1983 – 2014; bioterrorism 1999 –2004; Clostridium difficile infection, HIV/AIDS and antibiotic resistance 2006-2013 with  Major current interests: Clostridium difficile infection, HIV infection, antibiotic resistance, careers in infectious diseases.

Professor Simon M. Cutting, is a bacterial geneticist with over 25 years of experience with Bacillus since graduating from Oxford University with a D. Phil in 1986. His work on Bacillus probiotics provides another area of research interests and he was the first to address the fundamental mechanisms that might enable these bacteria to promote potential health benefits.  Presentation Topic: CDVAX in the  prevention of C. difficile infection.”

Dr. Clifford McDonald, MD, Currently the Chief of the Prevention and Response Branch in the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion at the Center of Disease Control (CDC).  Dr. McDonald graduated from Northwestern University Medical School, completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Michigan State University, and an Infectious Disease Fellowship at the University of South Alabama, following which he completed a fellowship in Medical Microbiology at Duke University. He is the author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications with his main interests in the epidemiology and prevention of healthcare-associated infections, especially Clostridium difficile infections, and the prevention of antimicrobial resistance.  Dr. McDonald’s Presentation Topic: “Clostridium difficile disinfecting and spores.”

Barley Chironda, Manager of Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) and Medical Device Reprocessing Device at St. Joseph Health Centre in Toronto, Canada. He is certified in Infection prevention and control (CIC TM) and has worked extensively as an Infection Preventionist. Barely has been an integral to the successful decline in Clostridium difficile infections through implementing innovative technology and quality improvement behavioral changes.   Barley’s presentation will show a behind the scenes account of the C. diff. management from the healthcare facilities perspective while providing a call to action.

Dr. Patricia Pietrobon, Ph.D. , Associate Vice President, Research & Development Sanofi Pasteur  has over 25 years of experience in the Vaccine & Diagnostic industries and more then 20 years in leadership roles focusing on research & development of new vaccines. Patricia began her career in diagnostic assay development with a focus on validation and quality alignment to regulatory requirements and GXPs. Patricia has been with Sanofi Pasteur for over 25 years and has contributed to the development and licensure of new bacterial & viral vaccines for pediatric & adult populations worldwide.
Sanofi Pasteur

Dr. Martha Clokie, PhD, Leicester UK, Professor in Microbiology.  Dr. Cloakie’s research focuses on phages that infect bacterial pathogens of medical relevance and  has published 41 papers in this area. Her major focus has been on Clostridium difficile where she has  isolated a large phage collection. In vitro and in vivo data has shown that the viruses have therapeutic potential. A patent has been filed  on these phages and  working with AmpliPhi to develop a product. Dr. Cloakie  has regular contact with the BBC and other media to talk about her work, and other phage projects, and has consulted with Science museum, London and Eden Project, UK to advise on bacteriophage displays.

Professor Nancy Sheridan,   a C. diff. Survivor and  Associate Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology and a winner of the prestigious SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Professor Sheridan will share her personal experience being treated for a painful and extended journey with a C. diff. infection (CDI).  Professor Sheridan has been teaching since fall 2000 in the Fashion Merchandising Management Department within the School of Business and Technology. For the past seven years, she has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton Business School to undergraduate and MBA students.

Dr Mel Thomson, PhD,  completed her Honors degree in microbiology and immunology at the University of Melbourne . She then immigrated to the UK where she worked on various projects as diverse as allergy and cancer before undertaking further studies. She completed a Masters of Research in functional genomics before reading for a PhD in microbial genetic regulation in Neisseria species, both at University of York, UK. After the award of her PhD, Dr Thomson became interested the host-pathogen interactions at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK.  Dr Thomson returned to Australia in 2011 to start her own research group studying host-pathogen interactions in the GI tract, at Deakin Medical School. A passionate science communicator, she has recently become a national ‘torch bearer’ for the concept of crowd funding academic research, which a track record of three successful ‘Pozible’ crowd funding campaigns, ‘Mighty Maggots’, ‘Hips 4 Hipsters’ and ‘No more Poo Taboo’

+ many more……….

NOTE:  *Presentations are not to be recorded audio or video or published without the presenters written and signed permission to do so by each attendee seeking publication of said presentations.

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We look forward to meeting you in Boston, Massachusetts on November 9th

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 A suggested local travel coordinator, for your convenience

LibertyTraveldownloadMichael Beckman — Team Leader,  Liberty Travel, 467 Washington Street, Boston, MA  02111
617-936-2435
Michael.Beckman@flightcenter.com

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 We would like to sincerely thank the following Corporate Sponsors for their continued support for the “RAISING C. diff. AWARENESS” conference being hosted in Boston, MA

syntheticbiologics

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AmericanGreenTechnologyhrms

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